Place:Middlesex, England

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NameMiddlesex
Alt namesMDXsource: Curious Fox: UK Counties and Shires [online] (2002). accessed 16 Dec 2002
Middelseaxansource: Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names (1998)
Middxsource: Curious Fox: UK Counties and Shires [online] (2002). accessed 16 Dec 2002; Royal Mail: PAF Digest [online] (2002) accessed 16 Dec 2002
Midelsexesource: Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names (1998)
TypeHistoric county, Administrative county
Located inEngland
See alsoGreater London, EnglandChild
London, EnglandChild
Contained Places
Borough
Bethnal Green
Chelsea
Finsbury
Fulham
Hackney
Hammersmith
Hampstead
Holborn
Islington
Kensington
Marylebone
Paddington
Poplar
Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea
Shoreditch
St Pancras
Stepney
Stoke Newington
Westminster
Castle
Tower of London
Cemetery
Teddington Cemetery
District
Bayswater
Blackwall
Bloomsbury
Brondesbury
Cricklewood
Crouch End
Cubitt Town
Dalston
East Finchley
Golders Green
Hackney Wick
Harlesden
Hatton Garden
Highbury
Highgate
Holloway
Homerton
Hoxton
Kentish Town ( - 1889 )
Kilburn
Kingsland
Longford
Mayfair
Mill Hill
Muswell Hill
Northwood
Notting Hill
Pentonville
Shacklewell
Somers Town
St John's Wood
Stamford Hill
Stroud Green
Whetstone
Winchmore Hill
Inhabited place
Brentford
Camden
Hounslow
London
Potters Bar ( - 1965 )
Southall
Westminster
Parish
Acton
Ashford
Bethnal Green
Bow
Bromley-by-Bow
Charterhouse
Chelsea
Chiswick
Clerkenwell
Covent Garden
Cowley
Cranford
Ealing
East Bedfont
Edgware
Edmonton
Enfield
Feltham
Finchley
Friern Barnet
Fulham
Furnival's Inn
Glasshouse Yard
Gray's Inn
Greenford
Hackney
Hammersmith
Hampstead
Hampton Wick
Hampton
Hanwell
Hanworth
Harefield
Harlington
Harmondsworth
Harrow Weald
Harrow
Hayes
Hendon
Heston
Hillingdon
Holborn
Holy Trinity Minories
Hornsey
Ickenham
Isleworth
Islington
Kensington
Kingsbury
Laleham
Liberty of the Rolls
Liberty of the Tower
Limehouse
Lincoln's Inn
Little Stanmore
Littleton
Marylebone
Mile End New Town
Mile End Old Town
Monken Hadley ( - 1889 )
New Brentford
Northolt
Norton Folgate
Norwood
Old Artillery Ground
Old Brentford
Old Tower Without
Paddington
Perivale
Pinner
Poplar
Precinct of the Savoy
Ratcliff
Ruislip
Saffron Hill
Shadwell
Shepperton
Shoreditch
South Mimms
Southgate
Spitalfields
St Anne Soho
St Botolph Without Aldgate
St Clement Danes
St George Hanover Square
St George in the East
St Giles in the Fields
St James Westminster
St Katharine by the Tower
St Luke
St Martin in the Fields
St Mary le Strand
St Pancras
St. Sepulchre
Staines
Stanmore
Stanwell
Staple Inn
Stepney
Stoke Newington
Sunbury
Teddington
Tottenham
Tower of London
Twickenham
Uxbridge
Wapping
Wealdstone
Wembley
West Drayton
West Twyford
Westminster
Whitechapel
Willesden
Wood Green ( 1894 - 1974 )
Yiewsley
Suburb
Eastcote
Unknown
Beauvoir Town
Brompton
Christ Church
Church-End (near Hendon)
Church-End (near Willesden)
Clapton
Goodmans-Fields
Greenhill
Haggerstone
Hampton Hill
Hanger Hill
Kensall-Green
Marble-Hill
Mile End
Neasdon
Notting-dale
Ponders-End
Poyle
Roxeth
Runwell
Shepherds-Bush
Spring-Grove
Stonebridge
Tower Hamlets ( - 1900 )
Upper Halliford
Westbourne-Park

Middlesex is one of the historic counties of England. It includes the City of London within its territory, although the city was self-governing from the 13th Century. In 1889 the administrative area of Middlesex was substantially reduced by the creation of the County of London, which also took in parts of Surrey and Kent. In 1965, Middlesex was abolished for administrative purposes and most of its territory was added to Greater London. Two small parts of Middlesex did not join Greater London: the Potters Bar Urban District became administratively part of Hertfordshire, whilst the Staines and Sunbury Urban Districts became administratively part of Surrey.

source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Middlesex (abbreviation: Middx) was a historic county in southeast England, that is now mostly part of Greater London with sections in Berkshire, Hertfordshire and Surrey. It was established in the Anglo-Saxon system from the territory of the Middle Saxons. The county included land stretching north of the River Thames from east to west of the City of London with the rivers Colne, Lea and a ridge of hills as the other boundaries. The largely low-lying county dominated by clay in its north and alluvium on gravel in its south was the second smallest by area in 1831.

The City of London was a county in its own right from the 12th century and was able to exert political control over Middlesex. Westminster Abbey dominated most of the early financial, judicial and ecclesiastical aspects of the county. As London grew into Middlesex, the Corporation of London resisted attempts to expand the city boundaries into the county, which posed problems for the administration of local government and justice. In the 18th and 19th centuries the population density was especially high in the southeast, including the East End and West End of London. From 1855 the southeast was administered with sections of Kent and Surrey as part of the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works. When county councils were introduced in England in 1889 about 20% of the area of Middlesex, along with a third of its population, was transferred to the new County of London and the remainder became an administrative county governed by the Middlesex County Council that met regularly at the Middlesex Guildhall in Westminster, in the County of London. The City of London and Middlesex became separate counties for other purposes and Middlesex regained the right to appoint their own sheriff, lost in 1199.

In the interwar years suburban London further expanded, with improvement and expansion of public transport, and the setting up of new industries. After the Second World War, the population of the County of London[1] and inner Middlesex was in steady decline, with high population growth continuing in the outer parts.[2] After a Royal Commission on Local Government in Greater London, almost all of the original area was incorporated into an enlarged Greater London in 1965, with the rest transferred to neighbouring counties.[3] After 1965 Middlesex continued to be an area name used, on various borders, in cricket and a minority of sports. Middlesex is the former postal county of 25 post towns.

Early history

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia


Modern history

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia


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