Place:Brentford, Middlesex, England

Watchers
NameBrentford
TypeTown, Urban district
Coordinates51.483°N 0.306°W
Located inMiddlesex, England     ( - 1965)
See alsoOld Brentford, Middlesex, Englandcivil parish which became part of Brentford in 1894
New Brentford, Middlesex, Englandcivil parish which became part of Brentford in 1894
Brentford and Chiswick, Middlesex, Englandurban district (then municipal borough) into which it was absorbed in 1927
Hounslow (London Borough), Greater London, EnglandLondon Borough into which the municipal borough was transferred in 1965
source: Family History Library Catalog

Brentford was first formed in 1894 as as urban district in western Middlesex comprising the neighbouring parishes of Old Brentford and New Brentford. The urban district was abolished in 1927 when it was merged with neighbouring Chiswick Urban District to form Brentford and Chiswick Urban District. Brentford and Chiswick was made a Municipal Borough in 1932 and was abolished in 1965 to become part of the London Borough of Hounslow in Greater London.

the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Brentford is a town in the western part of Greater London, England and part of the London Borough of Hounslow, at the confluence of the River Brent and the Thames, 8 miles (13 km) west-by-southwest of Charing Cross (a point considered to be the centre of London from which distances are measured). It has formed part of Greater London since 1965.

Brentford developed around the ancient boundary between the parishes of Ealing and Hanwell. It was divided between the chapelry of Old Brentford to the east in Ealing and the chapelry of New Brentford in Hanwell to the west. Of the two areas, Old Brentford was significantly larger.

New Brentford was first described as the county town of Middlesex in 1789, on the basis that it was the location of elections of knights for the shire (or Members of Parliament) from 1701. In 1795 New Brentford (as it was then) was "considered as the county-town; but there is no town-hall or other public building". This has caused confusion that remains to this day.

Brentford was the name of the Registration District for the west of Middlesex from 1837 (the start of civil registration) until 1947.

Brentford Dock

the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Brentford Dock was a major trans-shipment point between the Great Western Railway (GWR) and barges on the River Thames. The construction of Brentford Dock, to a design by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, was started in 1855 and it was formally opened in 1859. The former dock yard was redeveloped as a marina in 1972.

It was built by Great Western and Brentford Railway Company (later part of the GWR), to the south of the mouth of the River Brent and Grand Junction Canal, and opposite Kew Gardens. It was to the GWR main line at Southall. The original covered dock was destroyed by fire in 1920 and replaced by an iron and steel structure.

Traffic included coal, steel, timber, wood pulp, flour, animal feedstuffs, cork, general merchandise and in the 1950s Morris cars from Oxford. Coke from Southall Gas Works was carried from Southall to the dock.

After World War I the Thames frontage was adapted for boats of up to 300 tons. Craft using the dock included heavy river barges, canal boats and sailing barges. The dock included customs facilities. It has been claimed that 10% of Britain's trade passed through the dock.

Research Tips

  • See wiki.familysearch.org under "London" and also under "Middlesex", "Surrey" and "Kent" for key information about Greater London's jurisdictions and records, plus links to indexes, reference aids and Family History Library holdings.
  • The London Encyclopaedia by Ben Weinreb and Christopher Hibbert. An e-book available online through Google, originally published by Pan Macmillan. There is a search box in the left-hand pane.
  • London Lives. A very useful free website for anyone researching their London ancestors between the years 1690-1800. This is a fully searchable edition of 240,000 manuscripts from eight archives and fifteen datasets, giving access to 3.35 million names.
  • London Ancestor, a website belonging to one of the London family history societies, has a list of transcriptions of directories from the 18th century, listing in one case "all the squares, streets, lanes, courts, yards, alleys, &C. in and about Five Miles of the Metropolis..." In other parts of the same website are maps of various parts of 19th century London and Middlesex.
  • The proceedings of the Old Bailey, London's central criminal court, 1674-1913. A fully searchable edition of the largest body of texts detailing the lives of non-elite people ever published, containing 197,745 criminal trials held at London's central criminal court. This website is free to use.
  • Registration Districts in London, Registration Districts in Middlesex, Registration Districts in Surrey, Registration Districts in Kent, are lists of the registration districts used for civil registration (births, marriages and deaths, as well as the censuses). There are linked supporting lists of the parishes which made up each registration district, the dates of formation and abolition of the districts, the General Register Office numbers, and the local archive-holding place. This work has been carried out by Brett Langston under the agency of GENUKI (Genealogy United Kingdom and Ireland) and UKBMD - Births, Marriages, Deaths & Censuses on the Internet.
  • Map of West Middlesex from the Report of the Boundary Commissioners for England and Wales, 1885, printed by Eyre and Spottiswoode, London, and provided by London Ancestor.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Brentford. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Brentford Dock. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.