Place:Northamptonshire, England

Watchers
NameNorthamptonshire
Alt namesN'hantssource: Wikipedia
Nhantssource: BIAB Online (1999-2000) accessed 16 Dec 2002; UK Counties and Regions Abbreviations [web site] (1997-98) accessed 16 Dec 2002
Northantssource: Wikipedia
Northntssource: Gazetteer of Great Britain (1999) xviii
NTHsource: Curious Fox: UK Counties and Shires [online] (2002). accessed 16 Dec 2002
Northamptonsource: Family History Library Catalog
TypeHistoric county, Administrative county, Modern county
Coordinates52.333°N 0.917°W
Located inEngland
Also located inKingdom of England     (927 - 1649)
Contained Places
Administrative county
Soke of Peterborough ( 1889 - 1965 )
Borough (county)
Peterborough ( - 1965 )
Civil parish
Ailsworth ( - 1965 )
Bainton ( - 1965 )
Barnack ( 1011 - 1965 )
Borough Fen ( - 1965 )
Castor ( - 1965 )
Cranford
Deeping Gate ( - 1965 )
Edgcote
Etton ( - 1965 )
Eye ( - 1965 )
Glinton ( - 1965 )
Gunthorpe ( - 1965 )
Helpston ( - 1965 )
Lilford-cum-Wigsthorpe and Thorpe Achurch
Longthorpe ( - 1965 )
Marholm ( - 1965 )
Maxey ( - 1965 )
Newborough ( - 1965 )
Northborough ( - 1965 )
Paston ( - 1965 )
Peakirk ( - 1965 )
Peterborough Without ( - 1929 )
Preston Capes
Ringstead
Southorpe ( - 1965 )
Stamford Baron St Martins Without ( - 1965 )
Sutton ( - 1965 )
Twywell
Ufford ( - 1965 )
Upton (near Castor) ( - 1965 )
Walton ( - 1974 )
Wansford ( - 1965 )
Werrington ( - 1965 )
Wittering ( - 1965 )
Wothorpe ( - 1965 )
Hamlet
Deeping Gate ( - 1965 )
Gunthorpe ( - 1965 )
Marholm ( - 1965 )
Preston Parva
Upton (near Castor) ( - 1965 )
Walton ( - 1974 )
Inhabited place
Abthorpe
Achurch
Adstone
Aldwincle
Arthingworth
Ashby St Ledgers
Ashton
Aynho
Badby
Barby
Barnwell
Boughton
Brackley
Braunston
Brigstock
Brington
Brixworth
Brockhall
Broughton
Bugbrooke
Burton Latimer
Byfield
Caldecott
Canons Ashby
Castle Ashby
Chapel Brampton
Charwelton
Church Brampton
Clay Coton
Clipston
Cogenhoe
Cold Ashby
Collyweston
Corby
Cosgrove
Cottesbrooke
Cottingham
Courteenhall
Cranford-St. John
Creaton
Crick
Croughton
Crowfield
Daventry
Desborough
Dingley
Dodford
Draughton
Duddington
Duston
Eaglethorpe
Earls Barton
East Farndon
East Haddon
Easton Maudit
Edgcote
Elkington
Etton ( - 1965 )
Everdon
Eydon
Eye ( - 1965 )
Farthingstone
Fawsley
Finedon
Flore
Fotheringhay
Geddington
Glinton ( - 1965 )
Grafton Regis
Great Brington
Great Oxendon
Great Weldon
Greatworth
Greens Norton
Grendon
Guilsborough
Hanging Houghton
Hannington
Hargrave
Harlestone
Harpole
Haselbech
Hellidon
Helmdon
Helpston ( - 1965 )
Higham Ferrers
Holcot
Holdenby
Hollowell
Irchester
Irthlingborough
Isham
Kelmarsh
Kettering
Kilsby
King's Sutton
Kingsthorpe
Lamport
Lilbourne
Little Brington
Little Weldon
Long Buckby
Longthorpe ( - 1965 )
Lower Catesby
Maidwell
Marston Trussell
Maxey ( - 1965 )
Mears Ashby
Moulton
Murcott
Muscott
Naseby
Newbottle
Newnham
Newton Bromswold
Nobottle
Northampton ( 500 - )
Northborough ( - 1965 )
Norton
Old Stratford
Old
Oundle
Overstone
Peakirk ( - 1965 )
Peterborough ( - 1965 )
Pitsford
Polebrook
Potterspury
Preston Capes
Pytchley
Raunds
Ravensthorpe
Ringstead
Roade
Rockingham
Rothwell
Rushden
Scaldwell
Sibbertoft
Silverstone
Spratton
Stanford-on-Avon
Stanwick
Staverton
Steane
Stoke Bruerne
Stowe
Sudborough
Sulby
Sulgrave
Syresham
Teeton
Thornby
Thorpe Mandeville
Thorpe-Achurch
Thrapston
Titchmarsh
Towcester
Twywell
Upper Catesby
Walgrave
Warkworth
Warmington
Warmonds Hill
Watford
Weedon Bec
Weedon Beck
Weedon Lois
Weekley
Weldon
Welford
Wellingborough
Welton
Werrington ( - 1965 )
West Farndon
West Haddon
Westhorp
Weston by Welland
Weston
Whilton
Whiston
Whitfield
Whittlebury
Wigsthorpe
Wilbarston
Wilby
Winwick
Wollaston
Wood Burcote
Woodend
Woodford Halse
Woodford
Woodnewton
Woodwell
Wootton
Yardley Gobion
Yardley Hastings
Yarwell
Yelvertoft
Parish
Ailsworth ( - 1965 )
Ashton by Bainton ( - 1965 )
Bainton ( - 1965 )
Barnack ( 1011 - 1965 )
Blatherwycke
Borough Fen ( - 1965 )
Castor ( - 1965 )
Clopton
Glapthorn
Lilford
Little Billing
Newborough ( - 1965 )
Pilsgate
Southorpe ( - 1965 )
Stamford Baron St Martins Without ( - 1965 )
Stamford Baron ( - 1894 )
Thornhaugh ( - 1965 )
Ufford ( - 1965 )
Wansford ( - 1965 )
Wittering ( - 1965 )
Wothorpe ( - 1965 )
Settlement
Cranford Saint Andrew
Suburb
Glinton ( - 1965 )
Gunthorpe ( - 1965 )
Longthorpe ( - 1965 )
Paston ( - 1965 )
Peterborough Without ( - 1929 )
Walton ( - 1974 )
Werrington ( - 1965 )
Unitary authority
Peterborough ( - 1965 )
Unknown
Abington
Alderton
Aldwinkle-All Saints
Aldwinkle-St. Peter
Althorp
Apethorpe
Appletree
Armston
Ashley
Aston-le-Walls
Astwell
Barford
Barnwell-St. Andrew
Barton-Seagrave
Beanfield Lawns
Benefield
Blakesley
Blisworth
Boddington
Bozeat
Bradden
Brafield
Brampton
Braybrooke
Bulwick
Catesby
Chalcombe
Chelveston-cum-Caldecot
Chipping Warden
Cold-Higham
Collingtree
Coton
Cotterstock
Cottesbrook
Cransley
Culworth
Dallington
Danesholme
Deene
Deenthorpe
Denford
Denshanger
Denton
Drayton
East Carlton
Easton
Easton-Neston
Ecton
Evenly
Falcutt
Far Cotton
Farthinghoe
Faxton
Fineshade
Furtho
Gayton
Glendon
Grafton-Underwood
Great Addington
Great Billing
Great Creaton
Great Doddington
Great Harrowden
Great Houghton
Great Oakley
Gretton
Hackleton
Hardingstone
Hardwick
Harrington
Harringworth
Hartwell
Haselbeech
Hemington
Higham-Park
Hinton-in-the-Hedges
Horton
Hothorpe
Islip
King's Cliffe
Kings-Sutton
Kislingbury
Knuston
Laxton
Litchborough
Little Addington
Little Bowden
Little Harrowden
Little Houghton
Little Oakley
Loddington
Lower Boddington
Lowick
Luddington-in-the-Brook
Lutton
Maidford
Marston-St. Lawrence
Mawsley
Middleton
Middleton-Cheney
Milton
Morton-Pinkney
Moulton Park
Nassington
Nether Heyford
Newark
Newton
Orlingbury
Orton
Overthorpe
Passenham
Pattishall
Paulerspury
Piddington
Pilton
Plumpton
Preston-Deanery
Quinton
Radstone
Rothersthorpe
Rushton
Shuttlehanger
Slapton
Slipton
Southwick
Stanion
Stoke-Albany
Stoke-Doyle
Stoneton
Stowe-Nine-Churches
Strixton
Stutchbury
Sutton-Bassett
Sywell
Tansor
Thenford
Thorpe-Lubbenham
Thorpe-Malsor
Thurning
Tiffield
Upper Boddington
Upper Heyford
Upton (near Northampton)
Wadenhoe
Wakerley
Wappenham
Warkton
Weedon-Loys
Weston-Favell
Wicken
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Northamptonshire ( or ; archaically, the County of Northampton; abbreviated Northants.) is a county in the East Midlands region of England. It has an estimated total population of 629,000 (2011 census). The ceremonial county comprises the non-metropolitan county, which is governed by Northamptonshire County Council and seven non-metropolitan districts.

Covering an area of 2,364 square kilometres (760 sq mi), Northamptonshire is landlocked between eight other ceremonial counties: Warwickshire to the west, Leicestershire and Rutland to the north, Cambridgeshire to the east, Bedfordshire to the south-east, Buckinghamshire to the south, Oxfordshire to the south-west and Lincolnshire to the north-east – England's shortest county boundary at .

Northampton is its county town; other large population centres include Kettering, Corby, Wellingborough, Rushden and Daventry. Northamptonshire's county flower is the cowslip.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Much of Northamptonshire’s countryside appears to have remained somewhat intractable with regards to early human occupation, resulting in an apparently sparse population and relatively few finds from the Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic periods. In about 500 BC the Iron Age was introduced into the area by a continental people in the form of the Hallstatt culture, and over the next century a series of hill-forts were constructed at Arbury Camp, Rainsborough camp, Borough Hill, Castle Dykes, Guilsborough, Irthlingborough, and most notably of all, Hunsbury Hill. There are two more possible hill-forts at Arbury Hill (Badby) and Thenford.[1]

In the 1st century BC, most of what later became Northamptonshire became part of the territory of the Catuvellauni, a Belgic tribe, the Northamptonshire area forming their most northerly possession.[1] The Catuvellauni were in turn conquered by the Romans in 43 AD.

The Roman road of Watling Street passed through the county, and an important Roman settlement, Lactodorum, stood on the site of modern-day Towcester. There were other Roman settlements at Northampton, Kettering and along the Nene Valley near Raunds. A large fort was built at Longthorpe.[1]

After the Romans left, the area eventually became part of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia, and Northampton functioned as an administrative centre. The Mercians converted to Christianity in 654 AD with the death of the pagan king Penda. From about 889 the area was conquered by the Danes (as at one point almost all of England was, except for Athelney marsh in Somerset) and became part of the Danelaw - with Watling Street serving as the boundary - until being recaptured by the English under the Wessex king Edward the Elder, son of Alfred the Great, in 917. Northamptonshire was conquered again in 940, this time by the Vikings of York, who devastated the area, only for the county to be retaken by the English in 942. Consequently, it is one of the few counties in England to have both Saxon and Danish town-names and settlements.

The county was first recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (1011), as Hamtunscire: the scire (shire) of Hamtun (the homestead). The "North" was added to distinguish Northampton from the other important Hamtun further south: Southampton - though the origins of the two names are in fact different.

Rockingham Castle was built for William the Conqueror and was used as a Royal fortress until Elizabethan times. The now-ruined Fotheringhay Castle was used to imprison Mary, Queen of Scots, before her execution. In 1460, during the Wars of the Roses, the Battle of Northampton took place and King Henry VI was captured.


George Washington, the first President of the United States of America, was born into the Washington family who had migrated to America from Northamptonshire in 1656. George Washington's great-great-great-great-great grandfather, Lawrence Washington, was Mayor of Northampton on several occasions and it was he who bought Sulgrave Manor from Henry VIII in 1539. It was George Washington's great-grandfather, John Washington, who emigrated in 1656 from Northants to Virginia. Before Washington's ancestors moved to Sulgrave, they lived in Warton, Lancashire.

During the English Civil War, Northamptonshire strongly supported the Parliamentarian cause, and the Royalist forces suffered a crushing defeat at the Battle of Naseby in 1645 in the north of the county. King Charles I was imprisoned at Holdenby House in 1647.

In 1823 Northamptonshire was said to "[enjoy] a very pure and wholesome air" because of its dryness and distance from the sea. Its livestock were celebrated: "Horned cattle, and other animals, are fed to extraordinary sizes: and many horses of the large black breed are reared."

Nine years later, the county was described as "a county enjoying the reputation of being one of the healthiest and pleasantest parts of England" although the towns were "of small importance" with the exceptions of Peterborough and Northampton. In summer, the county hosted "a great number of wealthy families... country seats and villas are to be seen at every step." Northamptonshire is still referred to as the county of "spires and squires" because of the numbers of stately homes and ancient churches.

In the 18th and 19th centuries, parts of Northamptonshire and the surrounding area became industrialised. The local specialisation was shoemaking and the leather industry and by the end of the 19th century it was almost definitively the boot and shoe making capital of the world. In the north of the county a large ironstone quarrying industry developed from 1850. During the 1930s, the town of Corby was established as a major centre of the steel industry. Much of Northamptonshire nevertheless remains largely rural.

Corby was designated a new town in 1950 and Northampton followed in 1968. the government is encouraging development in the South Midlands area, including Northamptonshire.

Peterborough

The Soke of Peterborough was historically associated with and considered part of Northamptonshire, as the county diocese is focused upon the cathedral there. However, Peterborough had its own Quarter Sessions and, later, county council, and in 1965 it was merged with the neighbouring small county of Huntingdonshire. Under the Local Government Act 1972 the city of Peterborough became a district of Cambridgeshire.

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