Place:Derbyshire, England

Watchers
NameDerbyshire
Alt namesDBYsource: Curious Fox: UK Counties and Shires [online] (2002). accessed 16 Dec 2002
Derbysource: Family History Library Catalog
Derbyssource: BIAB Online (1999-2000) accessed 16 Dec 2002
TypeHistoric county, Administrative county, Modern county
Coordinates53.017°N 1.533°W
Located inEngland
See alsoGreater Manchester, EnglandChild
Contained Places
Borough
Erewash
Inhabited place
Abbot's Chair
Abney
Acresford
Aldwark
Alfreton
Alkmonton
Allenton
Allestree
Alsop en le Dale
Ambaston
Ambergate
Ashbourne
Ashford-in-the-Water
Ashover
Aston
Aston-on-Trent
Atlow
Bakewell
Ballidon
Bamford
Barber Booth
Barlborough
Barlow
Barrow upon Trent
Baslow
Beeley
Beighton Hill
Belper
Birch Vale
Birchinlee
Birchover
Blackwell
Bolsover
Bonsall
Boulton
Boylestone
Boythorpe
Bradbourne
Bradley
Bradwell
Brailsford
Bramley
Brampton
Brassington
Breadsall
Breaston
Bretby
Brimington
Brizlincote
Broadlowash
Bubnell
Burbage
Burnaston
Buxton
Buxworth
Caldwell
Calke
Calver
Carsington
Castle Donington
Castleton
Chaddesden
Chapel Milton
Chapel-en-le-Frith
Charlesworth
Chellaston
Chelmorton
Chesterfield
Chinley
Chisworth
Chunal
Church Broughton
Clay Cross
Clifton
Clowne
Coal Aston
Codnor
Coldeaton
Combs
Conksbury
Coton in the Elms
Cowley
Coxbench
Creswell
Crich
Cromford
Dalbury
Darley Dale
Denby
Derby ( 800 - )
Dethick
Dore ( - 1934 )
Dove Holes
Doveridge
Draycott
Dronfield
Duffield
Eaton Dovedale
Eckington
Edale
Edensor
Edlaston
Ednaston
Egginton
Ellastone
Elmton
Elton
Elvaston
Etwall
Eyam
Fairfield
Farley
Fenny Bentley
Fernilee
Findern
Flagg
Foremark
Foston
Gamesley
Glapwell
Glossop
Great Cubley
Great Hucklow
Great Longstone
Greenhill Lane
Grindleford
Hadfield
Handley
Hanson Grange
Hardstoft
Harpur Hill
Harthill
Hartington
Hartshorne
Hasland
Hassop
Hathersage
Hatton
Hayfield
Heage
Heanor
Heath
Hilton
Hognaston
Holbrook
Hollington
Hollins
Holmesfield
Hope
Hopton
Horsley
Hulland
Hungry Bentley
Ible
Ilkeston
Ingleby
Ironville
Kedleston
Killamarsh
King Sterndale
Kirk Ireton
Kirk Langley
Kniveton
Langley Mill
Langley
Leam
Linton
Litchurch
Little Chester
Little Cubley
Little Eaton
Little Hucklow
Little Longstone
Littleover
Litton
Long Duckmanton
Long Eaton
Longdendale
Ludworth ( - 1936 )
Lullington
Mackworth
Makeney
Mapperley
Markeaton
Marston-upon-Dove
Matlock Bank
Matlock Bath
Matlock Bridge
Matlock
Melbourne
Mellor ( - 1936 )
Mickleover
Middle Handley
Middleton-by-Youlgreave
Milford
Milton
Monyash
Morley
Morton
Mosborough
Mugginton
Nether Handley
Netherseal
New Mills
New Whittington
Newbold
Newhall
Newhaven
Newton Solney
Newton
Newtown
Norbury
Normanton
North Wingfield
Ockbrook
Ogston
Old Whittington
One Ash Grange Farm
Osleston
Osmaston
Over Haddon
Overseal
Owlcotes
Padfield
Palterton
Peak Cavern
Peak Dale
Peak Forest
Pentrich
Pikehall
Pilsbury
Pilsley
Pinxton
Pleasley
Potter Somersal
Priestcliffe
Quarndon
Radbourne
Rattle
Renishaw
Repton
Ripley
Risley
Rodsley
Rosliston
Roston
Rowland
Rowsley
Rowthorn
Sandiacre
Sapperton
Sawley
Scarcliffe
Scropton
Sedsall
Shardlow
Shatton
Sheldon
Shipley
Shirebrook
Shirland
Shirley
Shottle
Sinfin
Slackhall
Smalley
Smisby
Snelston
Snitterton
Somercotes
Somersal Herbert
South Normanton
South Wingfield
Sparrowpit
Spondon
Stainsby
Stanley
Stanton by Bridge
Stanton in the Peak
Stanton
Stanton-by-Dale
Staveley
Stenson
Stoney Middleton
Stony Houghton
Stretton
Sudbury
Sutton Scarsdale
Sutton on the Hill
Swadlincote
Swanwick
Swarkeston
Taddington
Tansley
Tapton
Temple Normanton
Thornhill
Thornsett
Thorpe
Thulston
Thurvaston
Tibshelf
Ticknall
Tideswell
Tintwistle
Tissington
Trusley
Tunstead Milton
Tupton
Twyford
Ufton Fields
Unstone
Upper End
Wadshelf
Walton
Walton-on-Trent
Wessington
West Hallam
Weston Underwood
Weston-on-Trent
Whaley Bridge
Whatstandwell
Whitwell
Williamthorpe
Willington
Wingerworth
Winshill
Winster
Wirksworth
Woodhead
Wormhill
Wyaston
Yeaveley
Youlgreave
Rural district
Chapel-en-le-Frith Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
Suburb
Ludworth ( - 1936 )
Unknown
Abbeydale St. John
Aldercar
Alderwasley
Alsop-le-Dale and Eaton
Alvaston
Arleston and Sinfin
Ash
Ashleyhay
Ashopton
Ault-Hucknall
Barton-Blount
Beard
Bearwardcote
Beauchief-Abbey
Biggin
Birley
Bolehill
Bondary
Borrowash
Boylstone
Brackenfield
Brough and Shatton
Brushfield
Burton
Callow
Calow
Castle-Gresley
Catton
Cauldwell
Chatsworth
Chilcote
Church-Gresley
Clifton-with-Compton
Codnor-Park
Cotmanhay
Croxall
Cubley
Curbar
Cutthorpe
Dalbury-with-Lees
Dale Abbey
Darley-Abbey
Derby Hills
Derwent
Dethwick
Dinting Vale
Dinting
Donisthorpe
Drakelow
Earl-Sterndale
Edlaston-with-Wyaston
Elmton-with-Cresswell
Foolow
Fritchley
Froggatt
Furnace
Furness Vale
Grassmoor
Gratton
Great Barlow
Green Bank
Grindlow
Hackenthorpe
Hallam Fields
Hartshorn
Hazlebadge
Hazlewood
Higham
Highlow
Holloway
Holme
Hoon
Hope-Woodlands
Hopwell
Horsley-Woodhouse
Ibstock
Ideridgehay
Ivonbrook-Grange
Kilbourne
Kings Sterndale
Kirk Hallam
Lea
Lea-Brooks
Lea-Hall
Long Lane
Longford
Loscoe
Low Leighton
Mappleton
Marple Bridge
Marston-Montgomery
Measham
Mercaston
Middleton-by-Wirksworth
Nether Haddon
Nether Padley
Newton-Grange
Norton
Norton-Lees
Oakthorpe
Offcote-Underwood
Offerton
Osleston and Thurvaston
Outseats
Pilsley (near Chesterfield)
Pinxton Wharf
Pleasley Vale
Ravensdale-Park
Riddings
Ridgeway
Rowarth
Scarcliff
Shottle and Postern
Sinfin Moor
Smerril
Somersall-Herbert
Somershall Herbert
South Darley
St. Michaels
St. Peter
Stanley Common
Stanton and Newhall
Stapenhill
Stoke
Stone-gravels
Stonebroom
Stretton-en-le-Field
Sturston
Sutton-cum-Duckmanton
Taddington and Priestcliffe
Totley
Trent
Turnditch
Upper Langwith
Wardlow
Wensley and Snitterton
Whaley Thorns
Whestone
Whitfield
Whittington
Whitwick
Willesley
Wilne
Wilsthorpe
Windley
Woodland-Eyam
Woodthorpe
Woodville
Yeldersley
Village or parish
Parwich
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Derbyshire ( or  ; abbreviated Derbys. or Derbs.) is a county in the East Midlands of England. A substantial portion of the Peak District National Park lies within Derbyshire. The southern extremity of the Pennine range of hills extends into the north of the county. The county contains part of the National Forest, and borders on Greater Manchester to the northwest, West Yorkshire to the north, South Yorkshire to the northeast, Nottinghamshire to the east, Leicestershire to the southeast, Staffordshire to the west and southwest and Cheshire also to the west. In 2003 the Ordnance Survey placed Church Flatts farm, near Coton in the Elms, as the furthest point from the sea in Great Britain.

The city of Derby is now a unitary authority area, but remains part of the ceremonial county of Derbyshire. The non-metropolitan county contains 30 towns with between 10,000 and 100,000 inhabitants. There is a large amount of sparsely populated agricultural upland: 75% of the population live in 25% of the area.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

The area that is now Derbyshire was first visited, probably briefly, by humans 200,000 years ago during the Aveley interglacial as evidenced by a Middle Paleolithic Acheulian hand axe found near Hopton.

Further occupation came with the Upper Paleolithic and Neolithic periods of the Stone Age when Mesolithic hunter gatherers roamed the hilly tundra. The evidence of these nomadic tribes is centred around limestone caves located on the Nottinghamshire border. Deposits left in the caves date the occupancy at around 12,000 to 7,000 BCE.


Burial mounds of Neolithic settlers are also situated throughout the county. These chambered tombs were designed for collective burial and are mostly located in the central Derbyshire region.[1] There are tombs in Minninglow, and Five Wells, which date back to between 2000 and 2500 BCE. Three miles west of Youlgreave lies the Neolithic henge monument of Arbor Low, which has been dated to 2500 BCE.

It is not until the Bronze Age that real signs of agriculture and settlement are found in the county. In the moors of the Peak District signs of clearance, arable fields and hut circles were discovered after archeological investigation. However this area and another settlement at Swarkestone are all that have been found.

During the Roman invasion the invaders were attracted to Derbyshire because of the lead ore in the limestone hills of the area. They settled throughout the county with forts built near Brough in the Hope Valley and near Glossop. Later they settled around Buxton, famed for its warm springs, and set up a fort near modern-day Derby in an area now known as Little Chester.[2]

Several kings of Mercia are buried in the Repton area.

Following the Norman Conquest, much of the county was subject to the forest laws. To the northwest was the Forest of High Peak under the custodianship of William Peverel and his descendants. The rest of the county was bestowed upon Henry de Ferrers, a part of it becoming Duffield Frith. In time the whole area was given to the Duchy of Lancaster. Meanwhile the Forest of East Derbyshire covered the whole county to the east of the River Derwent from the reign of Henry II to that of Edward I.

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