Person:Peter Timothy (1)

Watchers
m. 13 Apr 1822
  1. Jane Timothy1823 - 1833
  2. David Evan Timothy1824 - 1893
  3. Mary Ann Knott Timothy1826 - 1911
  4. William John Samuel Timothy1828 - 1905
  5. Augustus Frederick Timothy1829 - 1881
  6. Peter Vincent Timothy1831 - 1919
  7. Jane Timothy1841 - 1917
  8. Felix Festus Timothy1843 - 1910
  9. Justus Theophilus Timothy1848 - 1919
m. 11 Nov 1854
  1. Kathleen Ellen Timothy1856 - 1857
  2. Claude Vincent Timothy1859 - 1864
  3. Eustace Bertram Timothy1861 - 1892
  4. Edith Lizzette Timothy1864 - 1944
  5. Beatrice Eveline Timothy1865 - 1956
  6. Alice Blanche Timothy1867 - 1968
  7. Victor Leopold Timothy1871 - 1893
  8. Gustave Vincent Timothy1872 - 1925
  9. Mabel Constance Timothy1874 - 1970
  10. Cordelia Irene Jet Timothy1875 - 1943
  • HPeter Vincent Timothy1831 - 1919
  • WMary CookeAbt 1861 - 1884
  1. Bernard Vincent Timothy1881 - 1966
  • HPeter Vincent Timothy1831 - 1919
  • WAnne Webb1860 - 1919
m. 14 Feb 1905
  1. Ernest Augustus Timothy1886 - 1960
  2. Maud Eveline Timothy1888 - 1911
  3. Percy Lionel Timothy1890 - 1962
  4. Gertrude Cordelia Timothy1891 - 1964
  5. May Ethel Timothy1893 - 1947
  6. Sydney Herbert Timothy1895 - 1900
  7. Florence Timothy1896 - 1976
Facts and Events
Name Peter Vincent Timothy
Gender Male
Birth[1] 4 Jun 1831 St. Giles Without Cripplegate, London, Middlesex, England
Christening[1] 3 Jul 1831 St. Giles Without Cripplegate, London, Middlesex, England
Census[2] 6 Jun 1841 St. Giles Without Cripplegate, London, Middlesex, EnglandBarbican
Census[3] 30 Mar 1851 St. Giles Without Cripplegate, London, Middlesex, England1 Red Cross Street
Marriage 11 Nov 1854 Windsor, Berkshire, EnglandHoly Trinity
to Elizabeth Hutchings
Census[4] 7 Apr 1861 St. Giles Without Cripplegate, London, Middlesex, England43a Barbican
Census[5] 2 Apr 1871 Shoreditch, Middlesex, England72 Worship Street
Census[6] 3 Apr 1881 Manchester, Lancashire, England122 Rochdale Road
Census[7] 5 Apr 1891 Wigan, Lancashire, England95 Wallgate
Census[8] 31 Mar 1901 Longton, Staffordshire, England50 Uttoxeter Road
Marriage 14 Feb 1905 London, EnglandSt Bride, Fleet Street
to Anne Webb
Census[9] 2 Apr 1911 Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England33 South Quay
Death[10] 22 Apr 1919 Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England33 South Quay

Contents

Childhood

Peter Vincent Timothy was born on 4th June 1831, and baptised the following month in the parish of St Giles Cripplegate in the City of London. He was the son of Jane Timothy, formerly Cassanet, and her husband David Timothy, a feather and bedding merchant. The family lived on the street called Barbican, on the north side of the city.

Peter appears in the 1841 census living with his parents and siblings on Barbican. In 1851 the family's address was given as 1 Redcross Street, although it is possible that this was the same building they were in ten years earlier, as 1 Redcross Street was at the corner with Barbican. By this time, Peter was a medical student at St Bartholomew's Hospital. Peter received a certificate to practice medicine at Apothecaries' Hall in June 1852.

Peter spent some time as a young man working as a surgeon in Australia. He spent time at both Port Phillip near Melbourne and in Sydney, being mentioned in Australian newspapers in June and October 1853. His older brother, David Evan Timothy, had also travelled to Australia around the same time.

Marriage to Elizabeth Hutchings

By 1854, Peter was back in Britain, living at 45 Thames Street in Windsor, Berkshire, and practising as a surgeon. He was married at Holy Trinity Church in Windsor on 18th November 1854, aged 23, to Elizabeth Hutchings, who was sixteen years old. Peter and Elizabeth would go on to have ten children together between 1856 and 1875.

Shortly after their marriage, Peter sailed to Australia again. He later recounted how he had served as a surgeon on board a ship. He was actually in Australia in July 1855 when the Royal College of Surgeons in London formally admitted him to become a member. He later returned to London, where his and Elizabeth's first child, Kathleen Ellen, was born in July 1856. Sadly, Kathleen she died when she was only just over a year old in September 1857.

In October 1857, Peter was awarded the freedom of the City of London by joining the Worshipful Company of Loriners, one of the city's livery companies. At the time he described his father as being a gentleman who lived at 5 York Grove in Peckham, outside the city's boundaries in the southern suburbs. Being given the freedom of the city at the time allowed Peter to trade in the city in his own right.

In December 1857, Peter was prosecuted by a young woman called Thirza Alderwood, who claimed he was the father of her son, who had been born that October. Her lawyers argued that the charge should have been one of rape, but in the event the charge brought was one of being the father of the illegitimate child, and therefore responsible for paying for the boy's maintenance. Thirza described to the court how in January that year she had several times gone to see Peter at his surgery in order to get some medicine for her sister, who was pregnant. The court heard that on one occasion:

"...he followed her in [to the surgery] and fastened the door. He then took a cup of oil which she had from her hand, and commenced taking liberties with her, telling her it was no use bawling out, as he had made every arrangement to prevent her being heard. After he had effected his purpose, he opened the door and let her out, and when she subsequently informed him she was in the family way, he ordered her out of his shop, and refused to do anything for her..."

Peter denied that there was any truth in Thirza's statement, and claimed that the whole story had been fabricated in an effort to extort money from him. The court concluded that there was insufficient evidence to prove Thirza's allegations. They said that if she could produce corroborative evidence she would be allowed to obtain another summons against Peter. It does not appear that she managed to do so.

Peter and Elizabeth went on to have a son, Claude Vincent, in London in 1859. The 1861 census finds Peter, Elizabeth, their son and two servants living at 43a Barbican. Around the same time, Peter was elected as a guardian for the parish of St Giles without Cripplegate. However, he did not hold the post for long. Later that year they moved out to Whittlesey in Cambridgeshire, where Peter worked for the Poor Law Union. Peter and Elizabeth's third child, Eustace Bertram, was born in Whittlesey late in 1861.

Markyate

Peter and Elizabeth did not stay long in Whittlesey. By early 1862 they were living at Markyate in Hertfordshire. (The village was often called Markyate Street at the time, and straddled the parishes of Caddington, Flamstead and Studham, with the Studham part of the village being in Bedfordshire and the other parts in Hertfordshire. Judging by the birthplaces that their children later gave, it seems that the family lived in the part of Markyate in Caddington parish.)

Peter was initially brought in to help a surgeon there, Richard Stevens, who was ill and unable to work. Peter was appointed as substitute medical officer for the Markyate district by the Luton Board of Guardians in February 1862. At their meeting the following month it was reported that Stevens had died, and Peter was appointed in his place. Peter's duties included regularly reporting to inquests into deaths, and he is often mentioned in reports of inquests in local newspapers as a medical witness advising on a variety of injuries and deaths.

It seems that Peter bought the practice in Markyate from Richard Stevens' widow, Annie, but financially overstretched himself in doing so. The receipts were not as good as he had hoped and he was declared bankrupt on 17th February 1863. Accounts were prepared and examined, and it was found that Peter owed £519 6s 10d, of which he would not be able to repay £366 10s 3d. He was discharged from bankruptcy on 11th May 1863, on condition that he paid the Official Assignee fifty pounds a year until half his debts had been repaid.

Less than a month after Peter was declared bankrupt, his mother Jane died, on 3rd March 1863 at Peckham.

Peter continued to practice as a surgeon and medical officer in Markyate for another five years, in which time he and Elizabeth had three daughters: Edith Lizette in 1864, Beatrice Eveline in 1865, and Alice Blanche in 1867. Their son Claude Vincent also died in Markyate in 1864, aged four.

As well as performing his medical duties in Markyate, Peter became involved in the temperance movement, which sought to educate the public against alcohol consumption. In July 1865 he was listed as one of the gentlemen attending a tea party at Berkhamsted Castle, complete with a procession through the town, brass band, drum and fife band, public tea in a marquee and the release of balloons. In October 1865 Peter was the chairman of a meeting of the Total Abstinence Society which met at Watford Town Hall, in an evening of addresses and music performances. In February 1867 Peter was one of the speakers at a festival organised by the Primitive Temperance and Band of Hope Society at the Primitive Methodist schoolroom in Dunstable.

Later in 1867, Peter acted a secretary for a committee formed by the parishes of Caddington and Whipsnade, which felt that they were being over-charged for their contribution to the poor rates, which paid towards running the union workhouse in nearby Luton and associated administration of the poor laws. Peter entered into correspondence in October 1867 with both the Luton Board of Guardians and the Government's Poor Law Board in London, trying to get the financial burden on Caddington and Whipsnade reduced. He argued that Caddington and Whipsnade were being charged on the basis of a new valuation, but the rapidly growing town of Luton was still being charged on the basis of an old valuation. As such, the smaller parishes around Luton were being asked to pay more than their fair share of the burden. Neither the Luton Board of Guardians nor the Poor Law Board directly agreed with Peter's analysis, and the issue seems to have been deferred to a later date for a subsequent audit to try and resolve.

Whilst this correspondence on the poor rates was ongoing, Peter sold his practice in Markyate. The fact that he was very publicly challenging the authorities in Luton is perhaps indicative that he had fallen out with local people in positions of influence. Peter attended a meeting of the Luton Board of Guardians on 21st October 1867, at which he resigned his position as medical officer for the Markyate district and told the board that he had sold his practice to a Mr Bate.

A few weeks later, another meeting of Peter's creditors was held in London, at which it was said that he then had assets of £110 12s 4d in hand, presumably mostly being the net proceeds of the sale of the business in Markyate. The money was divided amongst his creditors.

London again

After leaving Markyate, the family returned to London, living at Worship Street in Shoreditch. In March 1868 Peter was appointed as honorary surgeon at the Islington and North London Provident Dispensary.

In August 1868 it was reported that Peter had arrested and detained a man called William Edwin Queneborough, a baker from Markyate, who owed Peter £27 7s 6d. Peter had Queneborough put in the debtors' prison at Whitecross Street in London. Queneborough petitioned the bankruptcy courts to be released, to which Peter's solicitor offered no opposition, so Queneborough was released.

Peter's father David died on 31st August 1868 at Peter's home at 72 Worship Street in Shoreditch. After his death there seems to have been a number of court cases between Peter, his siblings and their father's creditors, presumably trying to settle their father's affairs.

Peter and Elizabeth had a son, Victor Leopold, in 1871. The 1871 census finds Peter, Elizabeth, their five surviving children, two servants and a nurse (presumably for baby Victor) living at 72 Worship Street. In the early 1870s they moved out to the south-eastern suburbs of London, living at Lewisham in Kent where they had a son, Gustave Vincent, in 1872 and a daughter, Mabel Constance, in 1874. At the time of Mabel's birth their address was given as 3 Camden Villas in Lewisham. They then left the London area again, moving to Hastings on the Sussex coast, where their youngest daughter, Cordelia Irene Jet, was born in 1875.

Some time between 1875 and 1877 Peter left Hastings and moved to Manchester. It also seems that he and Elizabeth separated around the same time - no evidence has been found to show her living in Manchester with Peter, and they were certainly living apart by 1881.

Relationship with Mary Cooke

In Manchester, Peter lived at 122 Rochdale Road. His first sighting in Manchester was a dispute with the Manchester City Coroner in July 1877. Peter had issued a death certificate for a 30-year old woman, Isabella McGuffie, indicating that she had died of natural causes. He did not notify the coroner about the death as he did not believe there to be any suspicious circumstances. An anonymous letter to the coroner suggested that the woman's husband may have had a hand in her death. As such the coroner ordered a post-mortem to be carried out by another doctor, who agreed that the woman had died of natural causes, albeit exacerbated by drinking. Peter felt that the post-mortem being given to a different doctor was a great slight on his character and reputation, and wrote to the Lord Chancellor. Far from backing Peter up, the Lord Chancellor saw nothing wrong in what the coroner had done and declined to intervene, after which the coroner asked the local newspaper, the Manchester Courier, to publish copies of the letters, making the dispute very public.

The 1881 census finds Elizabeth and the children living in at 20 Princes Street in Southport on the Lancashire coast. Peter was not living with them, but at 122 Rochdale Road in Manchester with a woman called Mary Cooke, who was described as his housekeeper. She was about thirty years his junior, and was heavily pregnant at the time - she gave birth the month after the census to a boy called Bernard Vincent Timothy Cooke (with Cooke being his surname), who was generally known as Bernard Vincent Timothy and acknowledged in the 1891 census to be Peter's son. Peter and his wife Elizabeth do not seem to have lived together again after this time. It is not clear how much ongoing contact Peter had with his children from his marriage to Elizabeth, as they all seem to have lived with their mother until old enough to leave home.

Some time between 1881 and early 1883, Peter and Mary left Manchester and moved across the River Irwell to the neighbouring town of Salford. Newspaper reports of an inquest in January 1883 record that Peter was practising at 193 Regent Road in Salford.

Mary died when she was only about 24 years old. She died at 193 Regent Road in Salford on 21st August 1884 of "syncope following epileptic convulsion induced by excessive drinking". There is an irony in the fact that her death was drink-related, given Peter's previous involvement in campaigning for the temperance movement.

A couple of months later, Peter stood for election as the Liberal Party's candidate for the Ordsall ward on Salford Borough Council. The seat was retained by the incumbent Conservative candidate, with Peter taking 46% of the vote to the Conservative's 54%. Shortly after his defeat, Peter moved away from the Manchester and Salford area, with his next sighting being in Liverpool in 1886. Peter's first grandchild was born in 1885 when his son Eustace's wife had a daughter, although she died as a baby.

Relationship with Anne Webb

Peter started another relationship around 1885 with a woman called Anne Webb. (She herself signed her name as Anne, although in many records her name was given as Annie.) Anne was about 29 years his junior and from Knutsford in Cheshire. They had a son, Ernest Augustus, born in Liverpool in March 1886. Peter's first grandchild who would survive infancy was born later that same year to his son Eustace and his wife in the London area.

Peter and Anne moved around the country frequently, often for significant distances. They did not stay long in Liverpool after Ernest's birth. They had a daughter, Maud Eveline, in 1888 at St Helens in Lancashire. They then moved to nearby Wigan, where they had a son, Percy Lionel, in 1890. They were still in Wigan the following year, when the census found Peter and Anne and their children living at 95 Wallgate, along with Peter's son Bernard from his relationship with Mary Cooke, as well as a visitor and a servant. Peter and Anne had a daughter, Gertrude Cordelia, born at Wigan later in 1891.

Peter's son Eustace died in Stretford near Manchester in 1892, aged 31, leaving a wife and three surviving children. Eustace's widow and children emigrated to Australia shortly afterwards.

By 1893 Peter and Anne and their children had left Lancashire and moved about 200 miles south-east to Essex, having a daughter, May Ethel, in West Ham in 1893. Peter's son Victor died later that year in the Hastings area, aged 22.

Peter and Anne had a son, Sydney Herbert, in the Romford area of Essex in 1895. By 1896 they had returned to Lancashire, living briefly at 4 Lord Street in Leigh; their only sighting there being a letter of complaint Peter wrote to the local newspaper in July 1896 about the cleanliness of the water in the swimming baths at Leigh. By December 1896 they had moved to Manchester, where their youngest daughter, Florence, was born. She was Peter's eighteenth child (that he acknowledged), and he was 65 years old by the time she was born.

By 1900 the family had moved to Longton in Staffordshire. Their son Sydney died there aged four in 1900. The census the following year finds Peter, Anne and their six surviving children living at 50 Uttoxeter Road in Longton.

Great Yarmouth

Peter riding his little bicycle.
Enlarge
Peter riding his little bicycle.
By April 1903 the family had moved 180 miles east from Longton to the seaside resort and port of Great Yarmouth, on the Norfolk coast. Peter was clearly very taken with the town, writing a letter back to the local newspaper in Longton extolling the virtues of Great Yarmouth:

"Great Yarmouth has only to be known more fully, and then the toil weary ones from Staffordshire and Lancashire would wend their way there and realise that they had at last discovered a place of pleasant enjoyment and for the recuperation of robust health. The beef, fish, and potatoes here surpass the resources of any other county."

In July 1904, Peter's wife Elizabeth died in the Bury area of Lancashire, aged 65. They had been living apart for at least 23 years.

A few months later, on St Valentine's Day, 14th February 1905, Peter and Anne finally married, at St Bride's Church in the City of London. They returned to Great Yarmouth after their marriage, living there for the rest of their lives.

Peter continued to practice in Great Yarmouth, becoming known as the "poor people's doctor". He rode a little bicycle and became a familiar figure in the town. He frequently wrote letters to the local newspaper, the Yarmouth Independent. He wrote on a wide variety of topics, including advice for how to reduce the chances of drowning if getting into trouble in water, advocating the cause of having female politicians, rallying against the insanitary slum conditions in the area of Yarmouth known as The Rows, expressing his ideas how the town's tram system might be extended, and protesting against Sunday trading. The one subject that he returned to more than any other, however, was lamenting the fact that Great Yarmouth lacked a swimming baths, writing at least fifteen letters on the subject, frequently criticising the borough council for their unwillingness to provide a baths, and protesting against the council's decisions to support a racecourse and to make what Peter saw as unnecessary changes to the seafront instead of building a swimming baths.

Peter also continued to regularly appear in reports of inquests in connection with his work. In 1910 he was a medical witness in a case where a man was seeking more compensation from his employers for an injury. Peter clearly did not feel the claim was justified, as the following reported exchange between Peter (listed as "Witness") and the lawyers shows:

"Mr. Wiltshire - Can you form any opinion why it should have taken so long to heal?

Witness - The grand word "Compensation." (Laughter.) If there were no compensation, many of these wounds would get well very much quicker.

Mr. Wiltshire - Can you account for the condition of the leg this morning?

Witness - It requires knowledge of human nature to do that. (Laughter.)

Mr. Wiltshire - You have seen a good deal of malingering?

Witness - Oh, yes. I was at a refuge in London for some years, and examined 500 outcasts every day. There malingering was reduced to a fine art. (Laughter.)

Mr. Wiltshire - You think you have struck a little bit of it in Yarmouth?

Witness - Well, I don't like to be uncharitable.

Mr. Clowes - Can you say that that leg is well?

Witness - I should say he could work with it. I have worked with a much worse leg after tumbling off my bike.

Mr. Clowes - You would not have to tumble far. Does it not look malignant?

Witness - It might to a non-professional."

The man's claim for further compensation failed.

Peter's daughter Maud died in 1911, aged 23. She had been a pianist, having been recorded in the Great Yarmouth area as passing several piano and music examinations, suggesting that the family had a piano. The 1911 census taken shortly afterwards finds Peter, Anne and their five surviving children living at 33 South Quay in Great Yarmouth, overlooking the town's harbour.

Peter continued to practice medicine into his old age. In 1913 he was one of a panel of doctors listed as providing healthcare for the town under the new National Insurance Act.

Anne died on 3rd March 1919, aged 59, at home at 33 South Quay. Peter only survived her by a few weeks. He died on 22nd April 1919, also at 33 South Quay, aged 87. He had had at least 37 grandchildren born in his lifetime. However, he did not live to see Great Yarmouth gain its first swimming pool that he had so wanted to see; that opened three years after his death, in July 1922.

References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Baptisms register, in Church of England. St. Giles Cripplegate Church (London). Parish registers of St. Giles Cripplegate Church (London), 1559-1936. (London: London Metropolitan Archives).
    BAPTISMS solemnized in the Parish of ST. GILES, without Cripplegate, in the City of LONDON, in the Year One Thousand Eight Hundred and thirty one
    No.When BaptizedChild's Christian NameParents' NameAbodeQuality, Trade, or ProfessionBy whom the Ceremony was performed
    ChristianSurname
    10618July 3Peter Vincent
    B[orn] 4 June
    David & JaneTimothyBarbicanFeather MerchantJ.H. Alt
  2. England. General Register Office. The National Archives (abbreviated TNA): 1841 Census Schedules for England and Wales, Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. (Kew, Richmond, Greater London TW9 4DU, United Kingdom)
    Class HO107; Piece 727; Book 9; Folio 15; Page 25, 6 Jun 1841.

    Address: Barbican; Parish: St Giles without Cripplegate; City: London; County: Middlesex
    David Timothy, male, 35 [1801-6], Bedding Warehouseman, born in county
    Jane Timothy, female, 35 [1801-6], born in county
    David Timothy, male, 15 [1821-6], born in county
    William Timothy, male, 13 [1827/8], born in county
    Peter Timothy, male, 10 [1830/1], born in county
    Ellen Mullelly, female, 20 [1816-21], F[emale] S[ervant], b. Ireland

  3. General Register Office. The National Archives (abbreviated TNA). England and Wales. 1851 Census Schedules. (Kew, Richmond, Greater London TW9 4DU, United Kingdom)
    Class HO107; Piece 1525; Folio 344; Page 32, 30 Mar 1851.

    Address: 1 Redcross Street; Parish: St Giles without Cripplegate; City: London
    David Timothy, head, married, male, 49 [1801/2], Bedding Warehouseman, b. St George East, Middlesex
    Mary Timothy, widow [sic], widow, female, 78 [1772/3], supported by son, b. Wales
    Jane Timothy, wife, married, female, 48 [1802/3], b. Bethnal Green, Middlesex
    Peter V. Timothy, son, unmarried, male, 19 [1831/2], Medical Student St Barth[olomew']s Hospital, b. Cripplegate, London
    Jane Timothy, daughter, unmarried, female, 9 [1841/2], Scholar at Home, b. [blank]
    Justice T. Timothy, son, unmarried, male, 3 [1847/8], Son of a Bedding Warehouseman, b. Cripplegate, London
    Isabella Spaul, servant, unmarried, female, 21 [1829/30], Serv[ant], b. Southwold, Suffolk

  4. General Register Office. The National Archives (abbreviated TNA). 1861 Census Schedules for England and Wales, Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. (Kew, Richmond, Greater London TW9 4DU, United Kingdom)
    Class RG9; Piece 214; Folio 94; Page 13, 7 Apr 1861.

    Address: 43a Barbican; Parish: St Giles Cripplegate; City: London
    Peter Vincent Timothy, head, married, male, 29 [1831/2], Member of the Royal College of Surgeons Licentiate of Apothecaries Hall, General Practitioner, b. St Giles Cripplegate
    Elizabeth Timothy, wife, married, female, 22 [1858/9], b. Burnham, Buckinghamshire
    Claude Vincent Timothy, son, male, 1 [1859/60], b. St Giles Cripplegate
    Margaret Williams, servant, married, female, 51 [1809/10], Nurse, b. Rhayader, Radnorshire
    Mary Ann Hackett, servant, unmarried, female, 21 [1839/40], Housemaid, b. Waterford, Ireland

  5. General Register Office. The National Archives (abbreviated TNA). England and Wales. 1871 Census Schedules. (Kew, Richmond, Greater London TW9 4DU, United Kingdom)
    Class RG10; Piece 439; Folio 26; Page 5, 2 Apr 1871.

    Address: 72 Worship Street, St Leonard Shoreditch, Middlesex
    Peter V. Timothy, head, married, male, 39 [1831/2], Physician M.R.C.S., b. Cripplegate, Middlesex
    Elizabeth Timothy, wife, married, female, 32 [1837/8], b. Dorney, Buckinghamshire
    Eustace B. Timothy, son, male, 9 [1861/2], b. Whittlesea, Cambridgeshire
    Edith L. Timothy, daughter, female, 7 [1863/4], b. Hertfordshire
    Beatrice Timothy, daughter, female, 5 [1865/6], b. Hertfordshire
    Victor L. Timothy, son, male, 1 month [1871], b. Shoreditch, Middlesex
    Hannah Barker, nurse, widow, female, 51 [1819/20], Monthly Nurse, b. Sheffield, Yorkshire
    Eliza Coates, servant, unmarried, female, 26 [1844/5], Domestic Servant, b. Spitalfields, Middlesex
    Ann Murray, servant, unmarried, female, 17 [1853/4], Domestic Servant, b. Camden Town, Middlesex
    Alice B. Timothy, daughter, female, 4 [1866/7], b. Hertfordshire

  6. General Register Office. The National Archives (abbreviated TNA). 1881 Census Schedules for England and Wales, Isle of Man and the Channel Islands: . (Kew, Richmond, Greater London TW9 4DU, United Kingdom)
    Class RG11; Piece 3999; Folio 4; Page 1, 3 Apr 1881.

    Address: 122 Rochdale Road, Manchester, Lancashire
    Peter V. Timothy, head, married, male, 49 [1831/2], Physician & Surgeon, b. London, Middlesex
    Mary Cook, servant, unmarried, female, 19 [1861/2], Housekeeper, b. Cheetham, Lancashire

  7. General Register Office. The National Archives (abbreviated TNA). 1891 Census Schedules for England and Wales, Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. (Kew, Richmond, Greater London TW9 4DU, United Kingdom)
    Class RG12; Piece 3052; Folio 97; Page 13, 5 Apr 1891.

    Address: 95 Wallgate, Wigan, Lancashire
    Peter Vincent Timothy, head, married, male, 59 [1831/2], Physician & Surgeon Registered, employer, b. St Giles, London
    Annie Timothy, wife, married, female, 31 [1859/60], b. Knutsford, Cheshire
    Bernard Vincent Timothy, son, male, 10 [1880/1], Scholar, b. Manchester, Lancashire
    Earnest Augustus Timothy, son, male, 5 [1885/6], b. Liverpool, Lancashire
    Maude Eveline Timothy, daughter, female, 3 [1887/8], b. St Ann's, Lancashire
    Percy Lionel Timothy, son, male, 1 [1889/90], b. Wigan, Lancashire
    Ellen Swift, servant, single, female, 17 [1873/4], Domestic Servant, b. St Helens, Lancashire
    Margaret Alice Duckworth, visitor, single, female, 16 [1874/5], b. Ashton in Makerfield, Lancashire

  8. General Register Office. The National Archives (abbreviated TNA). England and Wales. 1901 Census Schedules: also for the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. (Kew, Richmond, Greater London TW9 4DU, United Kingdom)
    Class RG13; Piece 2617; Folio 90; Page 42, 31 Mar 1901.

    Address: 50 Uttoxeter Road, Longton, Staffordshire
    Peter V. Timothy, head, married, male, 69 [1831/2], Physician, own account, working at home, b. City of London
    Annie Timothy, wife, married, female, 41 [1859/60], b. Knutsford, Cheshire
    Ernest A. Timothy, son, single, male, 15 [1885/6], b. Liverpool, Lancashire
    Maude E. Timothy, daughter, single, female, 13 [1887/8], b. St Helens, Lancashire
    Percy L. Timothy, son, single, male, 11 [1889/90], b. Wigan, Lancashire
    Gertrude Timothy, daughter, single, female, 9 [1891/2], b. Wigan, Lancashire
    Ethel M. Timothy, daughter, single, female, 7 [1893/4], b. West Ham, Essex
    Florence Timothy, daughter, single, female, 4 [1896/7], b. Manchester, Lancashire

  9. General Register Office. The National Archives (abbreviated TNA). 1911 Census Schedules for England and Wales, Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. (Kew, Richmond, Greater London TW9 4DU, United Kingdom)
    Class RG14; Piece 11068; Schedule 300, 2 Apr 1911.

    Address: 33 South Quay, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk
    8 rooms occupied
    Peter Vincent Timothy, head, male, 79 [1831/2], married 26 years, 7 children born to marriage, 5 children still living, Physician & Surgeon, own account, b. Cripplegate, London
    Annie Timothy, wife, female, 51 [1859/60], married, b. Knutsford, Cheshire
    Ernest Augustus Timothy, son, male, 25 [1885/6], single, Plater, working for employer, b. Liverpool
    Percy Lionel Timothy, son, male, 21 [1889/90], single, Engineer Apprentice, working for employer, b. Wigan, Lancashire
    Gertrude Timothy, daughter, female, 19 [1891/2], single, Home work, b. Wigan, Lancashire
    May Ethel Timothy, daughter, female, 17 [1893/4], single, Home work, b. London
    Florence Timothy, daughter, female, 14 [1896/7], Scholar, b. Manchester

  10. Deaths index, in General Register Office. England and Wales Civil Registration. (London: General Register Office).

    d. Peter Vincent TIMOTHY, June Quarter 1919, Yarmouth Registration District, Volume 4b, page 4, aged 87 [1831/2]

  11.   London Evening Standard, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 2, 18 Jun 1852.

    APOTHECARIES' HALL.
    Names of gentlemen who passed their examination in the science and practice of medicine, and received certificates to practice, on Thursday, June 17:-
    [four names, including:]
    Peter Vincent Timothy, Redcross-street, Barbican.

  12.   London Daily News, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 3, 14 Jul 1855.

    ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS... At a meeting of the Court of Examiners on the 13th inst., the following gentlemen were admitted members of the college, having previously undergone the necessary examination, viz... Peter Vincent Timothy, Australia...

  13.   London, England. Freedom of the City Admission Papers, 1681-1930 (London Metropolitan Archives / ancestry.co.uk)
    13 Oct 1857.

    Finnis Mayor.
    Tuesday, the 13th day of Oct[obe]r 1857 and in the Twenty first year of the reign of VICTORIA of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Queen, &c.
    THIS DAY Mr. Chamberlain having presented unto the Court Peter Vincent Timothy to be made free of this City, by Redemption
    IT IS ORDERED,
    That the said Peter Vincent Timothy be admitted into the freedom of this City by Redemption in the Company of Loriners

    13th day of October 1857
    I Peter Vincent Timothy (Son of David Timothy, of 5 York Grove Queens Row Pekcham, Gent[leman]) occupying premises 38 Barbican in the City of London, and carrying on the Profession of a Surgeon &c do hereby apply to be admitted to the Freedom of the City of London, by redemption, in pursuance of the Resolution of the Court of Common Council of the 13th day of July, 1848, in the Company of Loriners of London; and I hereby declare that I am not an Alien, nor the son of an Alien, and that I am above the age of Twenty-one years.
    Peter Vincent Timothy

  14.   Morning Advertiser, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 7, 21 Dec 1857.

    ATTEMPT TO AFFILIATE A CHILD TO A SURGEON. - Mr. Peter Vincent Timothy, a surgeon and apothecary, at 38, Barbican, appeared in answer to a summons, charging him with being the father of an illegitimate child, of which the complainant is the mother.
    Mr. Buchanan, of Basinghall-street, appeared for the complainant, and Mr. Wontner, of Skinner-street, for the defence.
    Mr. Buchanan, in stating the case for the complainant, said that in January last the complainant's sister was confined, and that she attended upon her, and fetched the medicine from the defendant's house. On such occasions he directed her to go into the surgery, and on one occasion he followed her in and fastened the door. He then took a cup of oil which she had from her hand, and commenced taking liberties with her, telling her it was no use bawling out, as he had made every arrangement to prevent her being heard. After he had effected his purpose, he opened the door and let her out, and when she subsequently informed him she was in the family way, he ordered her out of his shop, and refused to do anything for her. Her father and brother called upon him after that, but he still declined to do anything.
    Thirza Alderwood, a respectable-looking young woman, was then examined in support of the statement.
    Mr. Timothy, the defendant, was then examined, and he solemnly denied the truth of the young woman's statement. He had never taken the slightest liberty, and it was a base attempt to extort money from him.
    Alderman Wire. - There was not the evidence required by the act of Parliament, and the case is therefore dismissed. The complainant can have another summons whenever she obtains further evidence of a corroborative character.
    The summons was dismissed.

  15.   Sheffield Daily Telegraph, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 4, 22 Dec 1857.

    EXTRAORDINARY AFFILIATION CASE.
    At the Guildhall police-court, London, on Saturday, Mr. Peter Vincent Timothy, a surgeon and apothecary, at 38, Barbican, appeared to answer a summons calling upon him to show cause why he should not be adjudged to be the father of an illegitimate child, of which the complainant is the mother.
    Mr. Buchanan, of Bashinghall-street, attended for the complainant, and Mr. Wontner, of Skinner-street, for the defence.
    Mr. Buchanan having stated his cause for the complainant, called
    Thirza Alderwood, a respectable-looking young woman, who said: I am at present residing in the City of London union. My sister, Louisa Chandler, was confined in January last, and I attended her. I was in the habit of going to the defendant's house for medicine for her, and he always directed me to go into his surgery. On one occasion when I went in he took hold of me round the waist and -
    Mr. Martin, the chief clerk: This is not a charge of rape.
    Mr. Buchanan: There is no doubt that was the course that ought to have been taken.
    Ald. Wire: These questions are not necessary in this case.
    Mr. Martin: Two or three questions will be quite sufficient.
    Witness: I am the mother of a male child, born on the 4th Oct. last. The defendant is the father of that child.
    Mr. Wontner: Now continue the story where you were stopped - when he took you round the waist. What did he do after that?
    Witness: He took me round the waist, but did not throw me down on the floor. I have never had improper intercourse with any other man. When my sister was confined, the defendant said I was also in the family-way, but I said it was not the case. Nearly the whole of what I have stated took place prior to the 20th of January. I have been under the doctor's hands before, but not for any particular complaint. That doctor told me I was three months gone in the family-way.
    Mr. Wontner: Oh, he did, did he; and pray when was that? - Witness: That was in September, 1856. I knew that was not the case.
    Ald. Wire: I cannot see what all this has to do with the case. If you tell me what your defence is to be I shall then be able to judge in what manner these questions bear upon the matter.
    Mr. Wontner: It is my intention to call witnesses, sir, to show you that this is a gross conspiracy to extort money from client.
    The defendant was then sworn, and made a statement to the effect that the witness had called upon him for medicine for her sister, and that he told her she need not come again, as he would send it round. She still persisted in calling, and ultimately her father and brother called upon and charged defendant with have committed a criminal assault upon their relation. He told them to call again, but when they saw that he had procured the assistance of a detective officer they made off.
    Mr. Buchanan: That is the case, sir.
    Ald. Wire: That is not the evidence required by the act of parliament, and the case is, therefore, dismissed.
    Ald. Wilson: What was the object of calling the defendant?
    Mr. Buchanan: Because he had no other evidence to corroborate the complainant.
    Ald. Wilson: And you have got nothing out of him.
    Ald. Wire: The complainant can have another summons whenever she obtains further evidence of a corroborative character.
    The summons was dismissed.

  16.   London City Press, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 1, 6 Apr 1861.

    TO THE RATEPAYERS OF ST. GILES' WITHOUT CRIPPLEGATE.
    GENTLEMEN,-
    HAVING been nominated as Guardian to your parish, the favour of your Vote and Interest is requested.
    Gentlemen, I remain yours faithfully,
    P.V. TIMOTHY, Surgeon.

  17.   Luton Times and Advertiser, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 4, 8 Feb 1862.

    BOARD OF GUARDIANS. - February 3rd.
    Present - Mr. G. Bailey, chairman: Messrs. Roth, Hawes, Robertson, Twidell, Davis, and Brown.
    The minutes of the preceding meeting were read, confirmed, and signed.
    A letter was read from the Poor Law Board, enquiring whether Mr. Stevens, the Medical Officer of the Markyate Street district, had resumed his duties. A letter from Mr. Stevens stated that the gentleman who had acted as substitute for him would attend the Board.
    Mr. E. Vincent Timothy [sic] was then granted an interview. He stated that Mr. Stevens had engaged him to attend to his practice generally, and in the meantime he was going to attend to the parish duties, if agreeable to them. He had had seven years' experience in the London Union, and he held and appointment at that time in Whittlesea Union, Cambridgeshire. He had attended to the duties of a Medical Officer for a Board of Guardians by the consent of the Poor Law Board. He had been out to Australia as surgeon to a ship's crew. He had also been employed to certify as to the fitness of candidates for the police force and the army.
    Mr. Twidell thought he could not act for them, since he held another appointment.
    The Clerk said he was going to resign that, and it appeared that Mr. Stevens must give up. The next thing would be to appoint some one, but they must know if Mr. Timothy was fully qualified Mr. Hubert was already the officer of another district. The salary of the Medical Officer for the Markyate Street district was £50 per year.
    The Chairman believed the candidate was thoroughly qualified.
    The Board then resolved to appoint Mr. Vincent Timothy as substitute for Mr. Stevens, if he were prepared to enter upon those duties at once.
    Mr. Timothy said he was prepared to enter upon them at once. He did not consider Mr. Stevens to be in immediate danger; he was suffering from chronic disease; he hanf in the balance, and if he ever resumed his duties it would be a work of time. He saw no reason to despair of him.
    The Chairman then informed Mr. Timothy that he was appointed substitute for Mr. Stevens, subject to the sanction of the Poor Law Board.

  18.   Luton Times and Advertiser, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 4, 8 Mar 1862.

    BOARD OF GUARDIANS. - March 3rd, 1862.
    Present - Mr. G. Bailey, chairman; Messrs. Burbidge, Brown, Davis, Ginger, and Roth.
    The minutes of the preceding meeting were read, confirmed, and signed...
    Mr. G. Bailey proposed, "That Mr. P.V. Timothy, surgeon, be appointed medical officer for the Markyate Street district, in the room of the late Mr. Stevens."
    Mr. Hawes seconded the motion, which carried subject to the sanction of the Poor Law Board.
    Mr. Timothy returned thanks for the appointment, and said he would do everything in his power to follow in the footsteps of his predecessor, though he found he had a difficult task to perform, as Mr. Stevens had by his excellent qualities secured the respect both of the rich and the poor in his district.
    The Clerk said the Markyate Street district contained a population of 3,853, and it was spread over an area of 11,374 acres.

  19.   England. The London gazette. (London, England)
    Page 982, 24 Feb 1863.

    Peter Vincent Timothy, of Markyate-street, near Dunstable, in the county of Bedford, Surgeon and Apothecary, having been adjudged bankrupt under a Petition for adjudication of Bankruptcy, in London, on the 17th day of February, 1863, is hereby required to surrender himself to John Fisher Miller, Esq., a Registrar of the said Court, at the first meeting of creditors to be held before the said Registrar, on the 12th day of March next, at twelve o'clock at noon precisely, at the said Court. Mr. Edward Watkin Edwards, of No. 22, Basinghall-street, London, is the Official Assignee, and Mr. C.J. Eldred, of No. 8, Great James-street, Bedford-row, is the Solicitor acting in the bankruptcy.

  20.   England. The London gazette. (London, England)
    Page 2622, 15 May 1863.

    Peter Vincent Timothy, of Markyate-street, near Dunstable, in the county of Bedford, Surgeon and Apothecary, adjudicated bankrupt the 17th day of February, 1863. An Order of Discharge was granted by the Court of Bankruptcy, London, on the 11th day of May, 1863, subject to the following conditions, viz:- That he pay over to the Official Assignee, fifty pounds per annum, until the creditors who have proved or may hereafter prove, have received a dividend of ten shillings in the pound.

  21.   Bucks Chronicle and Bucks Gazette , in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 2, 8 Jul 1865.

    GREAT BERKHAMPSTEAD.
    A TEMPERANCE DEMONSTRATION took place in this town on Tuesday, and was held in the Old Castle Ground, kindly lent for the occasion by Earl Brownlow. A procession left the British School at one o'clock, consisting of members of the Berkhampstead, Tring, and Hemel Hempstead temperance societies, and of their respective bands of hope - they having united for the occasion - headed by the Berkhampstead brass band and the Tring drum and fife band, which played at intervals during the day. At half-past two o'clock a meeting was held; after which the band of hope children had tea in a spacious marquee, and a public tea was also provided. At half-past six another meeting was held in which the following gentlemen took part: - G.C. Campbell, Esq., of the National Temperance League; Mr. Mumford and Mr. Arne, of the United Kingdom Alliance; Mr. Jabez Inwards, of London; Mr. Rutherford, of London; P.V. Timothy, Esq., M.D., of Markyate Street; and the Rev. T. Snell, of Berkhampstead. The ascent of several balloons in the evening terminated the proceedings.

  22.   Watford Observer, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 4, 28 Oct 1865.

    THE TOTAL ABSTINENCE SOCIETY.
    The Committee of this Society announce that they have made arrangements for holding a series of meetings during the winter months; and that this series will be inaugurated by a tea and public meeting in the Assembly-room of the Town-hall. At seven o'clock the chair will be taken by Mr. P.V. Timothy, M.D., of Markyate-street, and addresses delivered by Mr. N. Smyth, of Norwich. Selections of music will be performed during the evening.

  23.   Bedfordshire Mercury, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 5, 23 Feb 1867.

    DUNSTABLE.
    FESTIVAL. - A festival, in connection with the Primitive Temperance and Band of Hope Society, was held on Monday, February 18th, in the Primitive Methodist schoolroom. Tea was provided at five o'clock, after which a public meeting was held, when addresses were delivered by Rev. M. Wilson, Rev. W. Robinson, P.V. Timothy, Esq., M.D., and others.

  24.   Luton Times and Advertiser, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive.

    Lengthy articles [not transcribed here] on 12 Oct 1867, page 2, and 9 Nov 1867, page 3, discussing the revaluation of the Luton district for poor law rates, quoting correspondence between Peter Vincent Timothy and the Poor Law Board concerning his belief that the parishes of Caddington and Whipsnade were being overcharged.

  25.   Bedfordshire Times and Independent, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 8, 29 Oct 1867.

    LUTON.
    BOARD OF GUARDIANS. - The fortnightly meeting of the Guardians was held on Monday, October 21st, when a letter was read from Mr. P.V. Timothy, surgeon, Markyate-street, resigning the position of medical officer for the Markyate-street district. Mr. Timothy also attended to introduce his successor, Mr. Bate, to whom he had sold his practice. The Board authorised Mr. Bate to act for Mr. Timothy for a month, and they would then consider the appointment of a permanent successor, for which appointment, the Chairman said, Mr. Bate could apply in the regular way.

  26.   Bedfordshire Times and Independent, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 6, 17 Dec 1867.

    (Before the Hon. SPRING RICE, Registrar.)
    Re Timothy, Markyate Street, Beds.
    DIVIDEND MEETING. - This was a dividend meeting and for the proof of debts under the bankruptcy of Peter Vincent Timothy, of Markyate-street, near Dunstable, Beds., surgeon and apothecary, who petitioned the Court on the 7th of February, 1863, stating the cause of his bankruptcy to be his profits being insufficient to meet his expenditure.
    Messrs. Powell & Co., 3, Raymond-buildings, represented the creditors' assignee, Mrs. Annie Stevens, of Markyate-street, widow.
    The bankrupt passed his examination on the 11th of May, 1863, upon accounts showing the total debts to be £519 6s. 10d., and deficiency £366 10s. 3d. The Court on that occasion granted the bankrupt a conditional order of discharge that he should set aside £50 per annum until all his creditors were paid 10s. in the pound.
    It now appeared that the assets in hand amounted to £110 12s. 4d., which it was resolved to divide forthwith amongst the creditors who had proved their debts, and the meeting closed.

  27.   Islington Gazette, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 3, 17 Mar 1868.

    Gossip.
    Mr. G.D. Freeman, M.R.C.S.E., has been appointed surgeon to the Islington and North London Provident Dispensary; and Mr. P.V. Timothy, M.R.C.S.E., has been appointed one of the honorary surgeons, attending at the dispensary three evenings in the week.

  28.   Herts Advertiser, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 6, 1 Aug 1868.

    COURT OF BANKRUPTCY, Basinghall-street. Before Mr. Commissioner Holroyd. - Re William Edwin Queneborough. - This bankrupt, who is described as of Markyate-street, county of Hertford, baker and general dealer, a prisoner for debt in the debtor's prison for London and Middlesex, Whitecross-street, London, who was arrested and detained by Mr. Peter Vincent Timothy, of Worship-street, London, surgeon, for a debt of £27/7/6, applied to be discharged from custody, having presented his petition in forma pauperis. Mr. John Edwards, of No. 26, Bush-lane, Cannon-street, London, appeared on behalf of the bankrupt, and Mr. King on behalf of the detaining creditor, attended and offering no opposition, the learned commissioner ordered the release of the bankrupt. It appears from the examination filed in the court that he owes to unsecured creditors about £409; and that he gave a bill of sale to a solicitor of the name of King for £25 upon which the bankrupt alleges his effects were afterwards sold. The bankruptcy is attributed to badness of trade, being sued by creditors.

  29.   London Evening Standard, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 1, 5 Dec 1868.

    PURSUANT to a DECREE of the High Court of Chancery, made in a Cause PETER VINCENT TIMOTHY, Plaintiff, against WILLIAM JOHN FRASER and Other, Defendants, the CREDITORS of DAVID TIMOTHY, late of The Cottage, Penn-road, Holloway, in the county of Middlesex, Gentleman (who died in or about the month of August, 1868), are, on or before the 1st day of January, 1869, to send by post, prepaid, to John Jubilee Spiller and Son, of 3, South-place, Finsbury, Middlesex, the solicitors of Peter Vincent Timothy, the executor of the said David Timothy, deceased, their Christian and surnames, addresses and descriptions, the full particulars of their claims, a statement of their accounts, and the nature of the securities (if any) held by them, or in default thereof they will be peremptorily excluded from the benefit of the said Decree. Every creditor holding any security is to produce the same before the Master of the Rolls, at his Chambers, situated in the Rolls-yard, Chancery-lane, Middlesex, on Friday, the 15th day of January, 1869, at Eleven o'clock in the forenoon, being the time appointed for adjudicating on the claims.
    Dated this 2d day of December, 1868.
    ROBERT MARSHALL, Chief Clerk.

  30.   Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 6, 3 Aug 1877.

    THE MANCHESTER CITY CORONER AND ANONYMOUS LETTERS...
    Lengthy article, reproducing correspondence between Peter Vincent Timothy, the Lord Chancellor and Edward Herford, the Manchester City Coroner, involving disputes over who should have carried out a post-mortem on Isabella McGuffie, 30, after anonymous doubts had been raised about whether the woman's husband had played a part in her death, when Peter had certified natural causes for her death.

  31.   Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 8, 2 Jan 1883.

    Lengthy report of an inquest in Salford into a possible manslaughter case. The medical evidence was provided by "Mr. Peter Vincent Timothy, surgeon, practising at 193, Regent-road".

  32.   Manchester Evening News, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 3, 24 Oct 1884.

    THE MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS.
    SALFORD.
    The following nominations had been made at the Town Hall by one o'clock this afternoon:-
    ...ORDSALL WARD. - Peter Vincent Timothy, physician and surgeon, 193, Regent Road, nominated by John Abern and William Smallshaw. A second nomination of Mr. Timothy was made by Richard Jones and Athiel Dawson.

  33.   Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 5, 3 Nov 1884.

    THE MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS.
    SALFORD
    ORDSALL WARD.
    The retiring candidate, Mr. G.W. Gadd (C), was opposed by Mr. P.V. Timothy (L). There were only three polling districts, the stations being in Tatton-street, West Park-street, and Smith-street. Mr. Gadd is so popular in the ward that it was scarcely possible to conceive his defeat on the present occasion. His supporters were from the first confident of success. Number of electors, 3,618. The following polled:
    For Mr. G.W. Gadd (C)......1,047
    For Mr. P.W. Timothy (L)... 878
    Majority................... 169

  34.   Leigh Chronicle and Weekly District Advertiser, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 6, 10 Jul 1896.

    CORRESPONDENCE.
    THE LEIGH BATHS.
    To the Editor of the Chronicle.
    SIR. - This season the plunge bath has been more than usually inviting. In our unstable and unreliable climate the bright warm sky, the high temperature, the persistent heat of night and day have made the bath to the young and vigorous an object of desire, almost of necessity. To many, wearied by heat and work, a swim in clean water is a renewal of life and energy. How have our Leigh Patricians met this desideratum for the ratepayers? By the same old Rip Van Winkle style as heretofore, the Monday supply of clean and fresh water, with an every day depreciation of its freshness, with a rapid accumulation and impregnation of human emanation, until Saturday and Sunday present a turbid, human, soupy supply in which it becomes disgusting and dangerous to bathe. This is the careful and conscientious way in which men, useful in their own walks of life, put on the Leonine skin of committee men and bray out their orders for the public welfare. Surely their medical officer must have informed them that water is the frequent medium of conveyance of many diseases - that the bathers mouths and stomachs are the frequent recipients of fluids made dangerous by the washing of the body. This must offer itself in a manner palpable even to their capacities. It is vain for them to humbly plead economy, for the greatest economy is that which ensures the public safety, health, and decency, all of which by their parsimony they outrage. These few reasons I give for a daily supply of clean water at the baths during the summer season. Hoping that providence has endowed the committee with the intelligence of appreciation. - Faithfully yours,
    P.V. TIMOTHY,
    4, Lord-street, Leigh.
    6th July, 1896.

  35.   Yarmouth Independent, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 5, 4 Apr 1903.

    YARMOUTH AS A HOLIDAY RESORT.
    To the Editor.
    Sir, - Great Yarmouth is undoubtedly one of the healthiest, most picturesque, and pleasing resorts in the Kingdom; its shops vie with the brightest towns in the country - its tram service and road conditions, are excellent - results of good and considerate government.
    It requires but an extension of enterprise to make it an all-the-year-round resort instead of a short season place of sojourn. A pontoon floating swimming bath, or large bathing establishment after the manner of Southport with a winter garden, would contribute largely to a perennial season. It is now thoroughly understood that bathing and swimming are necessities for the English race, and that it is the duty of all corporations to provide permanent opportunities for the same.
    I remain sir,
    Yours faithfully,
    P.V. TIMOTHY, L.R.C.P. Lond. M.R.C.S. Eng., L.T.A., Lond., and L.M.R.C.S., Eng.
    34, Regent Road.

  36.   Yarmouth Independent, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 8, 11 Apr 1903.

    GREAT YARMOUTH AS A SEA-SIDE RESORT.
    In a letter to "The Longton Times and Echo" on the 4th inst., Dr. P.V. Timothy, of Regent Road, makes the following observations with regard to Great Yarmouth as a health resort. Undoubtedly Great Yarmouth is one of the finest seaside resorts in the Kingdom. With a population of 51,250 there are only 28 doctors, who suffice for the permanent inhabitants, and also for the trippers and visitors in the summer; whereas Southport, with a population of 48,083, requires for its needs 116 doctors for the ailments of the place. Blackpool has a population of 50,330, and glories in the possession of 45 doctors. Great Yarmouth has only to be known more fully, and then the toil weary ones from Staffordshire and Lancashire would wend their way there and realise that they had at last discovered a place of pleasant enjoyment and for the recuperation of robust health. The beef, fish, and potatoes here surpass the resources of any other county.

  37.   Yarmouth Independent, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive.

    Peter's many letters to the Yarmouth Independent between 1903 and his death are too numerous to transcribe here, but their broad content is summarised in the narrative. There are 22 letters which have been found, being in the Yarmouth Independent issues dated:
    4 Apr 1903
    5 Sep 1903
    10 Feb 1906
    24 Feb 1906
    3 Mar 1906
    10 Mar 1906
    31 Mar 1906
    7 Apr 1906
    12 May 1906
    6 Jul 1907
    7 Sep 1907
    21 Dec 1907
    16 May 1908
    18 Jul 1908
    5 Sep 1908
    12 Sep 1908
    26 Jun 1909
    9 Oct 1909
    5 Feb 1910
    15 Oct 1910
    29 Mar 1913
    5 Apr 1913

  38.   Norfolk News, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 12, 7 May 1910.

    WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT APPLICATION.
    Samuel Smith v. Messrs. Bullard & Sons, Ltd. - Mr. Percy Wiltshire applied under the Workmen's Compensation Act for his Honour to review an award made on March 10th, under which 10s. a week was agreed to be paid by Messrs. Bullard & Sons to Samuel Smith, formerly tenant of the Canterbury, covering a period from August last, when he injured his leg through a case a bottled beer falling on it. Mr. Wiltshire appeared for Messrs. Bullard, and asked for the award to be ended; and Mr. A. Fellowes opposed the application.
    Dr. J. Ryley, who examined the respondent on behalf of the applicants, said he first saw him on February 9th. On his left leg were two small ulcers, one round and the other oval, of a curiously superficial nature. They had never been deep ulcers at all. The leg was swollen and congested. The ulcers were just above the ankle, one being three-quarters of an inch in diameter, and the other half and inch long and a-quarter of an inch wide. Respondent was not resting the leg, and was not evening wearing a bandage, and he told him that if he laid up in a week or two the leg would get well of itself. On March 2nd he saw him in consultation with his own adviser, Dr. Timothy. They bandaged the leg and agreed in recommending rest. A fortnight later, when he next saw him, the swelling had completely disappeared, and one of the ulcers was absolutely well. He could only account for the other not being as well in two ways - either wilful neglect or active malingering. He had not rested himself as advised. Witness had seen him at the bar, and had seen him attending at the police-court. Once when he went respondent was out. On April 11th Smith called at his house and said his leg was well. He showed him a certificate Dr. Timothy had given him that his leg was well, and witness gave him a similar certificate. He was quite able to go to work.
    Cross-examined - There was no possibility of blood poisoning or gangrene or of any harm following if the respondent went to sea.
    At Mr. Clowes' request Dr. Ryley went to the back of the court and examined Smith's leg. Mr. Clowes said its condition would speak for itself, and he also asked his Honour to look at it, but this the judge declined to do. After the examination Dr. Ryley stated that the man was wearing no bandage to protect it. He only had a bit of linen rag round it. There was one very small superficial ulcer, which was very small. Above it was a varicose vein, with which the accident could have nothing to do. This ulcer was healed on April 11th, and it was open now through neglect.
    Dr. P.V. Timothy said the respondent first came to him on November 10th suffering from ulcers on the leg. He said nothing about an accident. Witness told him he did not care for any case in which an application for compensation would be made. He put liniment on, and advised him to rest the leg. Subsequently as it got no better he altered the treatment, and repeatedly expostulated with the respondent because it did not improve. He grew out of patience to think that such a small injury should take up so much time. He always said he rested it as much as possible. After the treatment by Dr. Ryley they both expected it to be healed in a few days. On April 2nd he gave him a certificate that the leg was well.
    Asked as to the state of the man's leg that morning witness said it was the kind of leg a man of good courage would take no notice of.
    Mr. Wiltshire - Can you form any opinion why it should have taken so long to heal?
    Witness - The grand word "Compensation." (Laughter.) If there were no compensation, many of these wounds would get well very much quicker.
    Mr. Wiltshire - Can you account for the condition of the leg this morning?
    Witness - It requires knowledge of human nature to do that. (Laughter.)
    Mr. Wiltshire - You have seen a good deal of malingering?
    Witness - Oh, yes. I was at a refuge in London for some years, and examined 500 outcasts every day. There malingering was reduced to a fine art. (Laughter.)
    Mr. Wiltshire - You think you have struck a little bit of it in Yarmouth?
    Witness - Well, I don't like to be uncharitable.
    Mr. Clowes - Can you say that that leg is well?
    Witness - I should say he could work with it. I have worked with a much worse leg after tumbling off my bike.
    Mr. Clowes - You would not have to tumble far. Does it not look malignant?
    Witness - It might to a non-professional.
    Asked as to whether there was not danger of blood poisoning if the respondent went to sea, witness said he had been a surgeon on a ship which sailed round the world, and he had seen men, with very much worse legs than this was when he first saw it, hard at work doing the duty of sailing ship. There was nothing to preclude the respondent working.
    The respondent was then called, and said he was a certified skipper of a trawler. He weighed 14 stone, and was 57 years old. 10s. a week was no good to him, and he wanted to get to work as quickly as possible. He had saved £270 trawling but had lost it all at the "Canterbury," and he never spent it to waste either. In the summer Messrs. Bullards gave him employment as a labourer, and this was when he received the injury. He could not put his foot on the ground for three weeks, and it was very painful. He denied malingering or neglect of taking proper measures to get the leg well. He had rested it by remaining indoors three and four days together. The bandage seemed to make the leg worse, as it stopped the circulation of the blood and made his foot numb. He had not served in the bar when he was on his club. Taking only 6d. a day did not call for much serving. One could sit in the bar and have a good rest. It took three weeks to draw half a barrel of mild. If his leg was well he would have been off to sea before now. It had never healed up yet.
    Dr. Kemp said he had seen respondent's leg that morning. It was not healed, and he was absolutely not fit to go to sea.
    Cross-examined - With proper attention, such a leg should have healed in a month or six weeks.
    His Honour held that if respondent was unable to go to sea, it was owing to his own neglect to take reasonable precautions. The payment of compensation must, therefore, cease.

  39.   Yarmouth Independent, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 5, 11 Jan 1913.

    THE DOCTORS AND THE ACT.
    After months of discussion a sufficient panel of medical men has been formed for Great Yarmouth. A week ago it did not appear that such would be the case. But within two or three days a remarkable development took place. On Saturday night nineteen Yarmouth practitioners met the Medical Sub-Committee of the Insurance Committee at the Town Hall. We believe considerable feeling was shown, and there was some very plain speaking. In the result seven of the nineteen members of the British Medical Association present agreed to come on the panel, apart from two medical men who had already signified assent. These were not considered adequate for the persons insured, whose number had been under estimated, and is not put at about 17,600. Under these circumstance, and as it was thought possible others might come in, it was decided to leave the question open until the next Monday. With Monday came further reflection, and at night it transpired that as the outcome of a further meeting sixteen accepted service under the terms of the Insurance Act, namely:-... P.V. Timothy... Nine are still holding aloof, and the letter from Dr. R.S. Shaw, which appears in another column, puts clearly their views on the important and contentious question of contracting out.

  40.   Yarmouth Independent, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 8, 26 Apr 1919.

    DEATHS
    TIMOTHY.-On 22nd April, 1919, at 33, South Quay, Peter Vincent Timothy, L.R.C.P., Lond., M.R.C.S. Eng., L.S.A., aged 87 years.

  41.   Yarmouth Independent, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 2, 3 May 1919.

    DEATH OF DR. TIMOTHY.
    We much regret to record the death of Dr. P.V. Timothy, M.R.C.S., who had been in practice in Yarmouth for upwards of 14 years. Dr. Timothy on his little bicycle was a familiar figure. He had an interesting personality and was popularly known as the Poor People's Doctor. He took a good deal of interest in local affairs, which was expressed in frequent letters to the local papers.

  42.   Yarmouth Independent, in United Kingdom. The British Newspaper Archive
    Page 5, 22 Jul 1922.

    YARMOUTH'S "GREAT SPLASH."
    OPENING OF CORPORATION SWIMMING POOL.
    MAYOR AND ALDERMAN BAYFIELD TO CONTEST FIRST RACE.
    Another step in Yarmouth's forward policy to bring before the pleasure-seeking public the town's undoubted claims to patronage will be achieved to-morrow (Saturday) when the Mayor (Mr. F. Brett) will officially dedicate to the town's use the very fine swimming pool which has been constructed on the Central Beach. This latest addition to the town's amusement catering facilities, together with the recently-opened new hard tennis courts on the North Drive, has long been desired, but Yarmouth has lost nothing by waiting, for it now has in dimensions one of the largest pools, if not actually the largest, in the kingdom...

  43.   Adelaide Observer (Adelaide, South Australia / trove.nla.gov.au)
    Page 5, Sat 11 Jun 1853.

    LETTERS DETAINED IN THE POST-OFFICE FOR SEA POSTAGE
    Peter V Timothy, Surgeon, Port Phillip or Sydney.

  44.   The Argus (Melbourne, Victoria / trove.nla.gov.au)
    Page 1, Tue 18 Oct 1853.

    DAVID EVAN TIMOTHY who arrived here per William Wallace, October, 1852, or P.V. Timothy, will find letters at Messrs. Krohn and Co's office, 41 Collins-street west.

  45.   Discovery Catalogue (The National Archives).

    1868 T106 Timothy v Timothy
    Short title: In the matter of the estate of David Timothy gent, late of The Cottage, Penn Road, Holloway, Middlesex deceased
    Documents: Administration summons.
    Plaintiffs: David Evan Timothy
    Defendants: Peter Vincent Timothy

    1868 T108 Timothy v Timothy
    Plaintiff: Felix Festus Timothy
    Defendants: David Evan Timothy, William John Samuel Timothy, John Barker, Mary Ann Knott Barker his wife, Augustus Frederick Timothy, Peter Vincent Timothy, William Fraser, Jane Fraser his wife and Justus Theophilus Timothy

    1868 T109 Timothy v Fraser
    Plaintiff: Peter Vincent Timothy
    Defendants: William John Fraser and Jane Fraser his wife

    M3851/18: Title deeds for No 32 Church Street, Stoke Newington
    Copy Admission Manor of Stoke Newington
    Of Peter Vincent Timothy, Justus Theophilus Timothy and George Barker, devisees of David Timothy.
    Date: 9 December 186 [sic - presumably 1868 following David's death earlier that year.]

    1870 T58 Timothy v Timothy
    Plaintiffs: William John Samuel Timothy
    Defendants: Sarah Timothy, Jane Timothy, Marion Timothy, Edward Henry Davies (since abroad) and Peter Vincent Timothy