Place:Sussex, England

redirected from Place:Sussex
NameSussex
Alt namesSSXsource: Curious Fox: UK Counties and Shires [online] (2002). accessed 16 Dec 2002
TypeHistoric county
Coordinates50.87°N 0.01°E
Located inEngland
See alsoEast Sussex, Englandadministrative county covering the eastern part since 1888
West Sussex, Englandadministrative county covering the western part since 1888
Contained Places
Administrative county
East Sussex ( - 1974 )
West Sussex ( - 1974 )
Borough (county)
Brighton
Eastbourne
Hastings
Borough (municipal)
Arundel
Bexhill on Sea
Chichester
Hove
Lewes ( 800 - )
Rye
Worthing
Civil parish
Boxgrove
Bury
Chailey
Chichester St. Bartholomew ( - 1896 )
Chichester St. Pancras ( - 1896 )
Chichester St. Peter the Great ( - 1896 )
Chidham
Ditchling
East Guldeford
Fernhurst
Hastings Holy Trinity ( - 1909 )
Hastings St. Andrew ( - 1909 )
Hastings St. Clement
Hastings St. Mary Bulverhythe ( - 1909 )
Hastings St. Mary Magdalen ( - 1909 )
Hastings St. Mary in the Castle ( - 1939 )
Hastings St. Michael ( - 1909 )
Hollington Rural
Hunston
Lurgashall
North Mundham
Old Shoreham
Oving
Pagham
Rogate
Rye Foreign
Sidlesham
Ticehurst
Upper Beeding
Winchelsea
Former administrative division
Arundel Rape
Bramber Rape
Chichester Rape
Hastings Rape
Lewes Rape
Pevensey Rape
Hamlet
Faygate
South Mundham
Treyford
Inhabited place
Adversane
Aldingbourne
Aldwick
Alfriston
Amberley
Angmering
Apple Down
Ardingly
Arundel
Balcombe
Barcombe
Battle
Beckley
Bewbush
Bignor
Billingshurst
Birling Gap
Bodiam
Bognor Regis
Bolney
Bosham
Boxgrove
Bramber
Brightling
Brighton
Broad Oak
Broadfield
Burgess Hill
Burwash
Bury
Buxted
Camber
Catsfield
Chailey
Chichester
Chiddingly
Chidham
Clapham
Clayton
Coombes
Cowfold
Crawley Down
Crowborough
Dallington
Dial Post
Ditchling
East Grinstead
East Hoathly with Halland
East Preston
East Wittering
Eastbourne
Eastdean
Elmer
Eridge Green
Etchingham
Fairlight
Falmer
Felpham
Ferring
Findon
Fishbourne
Fittleworth
Forest Row
Foul Mile
Friston
Furnace Green
Glyndebourne
Goodwood
Goring by Sea
Gossops Green
Groombridge
Hailsham
Halland
Hardham
Hartfield
Hassocks
Hastings
Heathfield
Henfield
Herstmonceux
Hooe
Horam
Horsham
Horsted Keynes
Hunston
Hurstpierpoint
Icklesham
Ifield
Isfield
Keymer
Kingston by Sea
Lancing
Langley Green
Lindfield
Littlehampton
Lurgashall
Lyminster
Maidenbower
Mannings Heath
Manor Royal
Maresfield
Mayfield
Midhurst
Netherfield
Newick
Ninfield
North Mundham
Northgate
Northiam
Ore
Pagham
Patcham
Peacehaven
Pease Pottage
Peasmarsh
Petworth
Pevensey
Plumpton
Polegate
Pound Hill
Poynings
Pulborough
Ringmer
Robertsbridge
Rottingdean
Rusper
Rustington
Rye
Salehurst
Sedlescombe
Selsey
Shoreham by Sea
Sidlesham
Singleton
Small Dole
Sockbridge
Sompting
Southgate
Southwater
St. Leonards on Sea
Steyning
Storrington
Three Bridges
Ticehurst
Tilgate
Turners Hill
Uckfield
Udimore
Upper Beeding
Wadhurst
Warbleton
Warham
Warminghurst
Washington
West Dean
West Green
Westbourne
Westdean
Westfield
Westmeston
Whatlington
Wick
Willingdon
Wilmington
Withyham
Woolbeding
Worth
Worthing
Modern county
East Sussex ( - 1974 )
West Sussex ( - 1974 )
Parish
Rumboldswyke
Westhampnett
Parish (ancient)
Chichester St. Bartholomew ( - 1896 )
Chichester St. Pancras ( - 1896 )
Chichester St. Peter the Great ( - 1896 )
East Guldeford
Hastings All Saints
Hastings Holy Trinity ( - 1909 )
Hastings St. Andrew ( - 1909 )
Hastings St. Clement's
Hastings St. Clement
Hastings St. Mary Magdalen ( - 1909 )
Hastings St. Mary in the Castle ( - 1939 )
Hastings St. Michael ( - 1909 )
Old Shoreham
Rogate
Winchelsea
Registration district
Battle Registration District ( 1837 - 1974 )
Brighton Registration District ( 1837 - 1974 )
Chailey Registration District ( 1837 - 1838 )
Chanctonbury Registration District ( 1935 - 1974 )
Chichester Registration District ( 1837 - 1974 )
Cuckfield Registration District ( 1837 - 1974 )
East Grinstead Registration District ( 1837 - 1935 )
East Preston Registration District ( 1870 - 1935 )
Eastbourne Registration District ( 1837 - 1974 )
Hailsham Registration District ( 1837 - 1974 )
Hastings Registration District ( 1837 - 1974 )
Horsham Registration District ( 1837 - 1974 )
Hove Registration District ( 1835 - 1974 )
Lewes Registration District ( 1837 - 1974 )
Midhurst Registration District ( 1837 - 1935 )
Midhurst and Petworth Registration District ( 1935 - 1974 )
Newhaven (early) registration district ( 1837 - 1839 )
Newhaven (late) registration district ( 1901 - 1935 )
Petworth Registration District ( 1837 - 1935 )
Rye Registration District ( 1837 - 1895 )
Steyning Registration District ( 1837 - 1935 )
Thakenham Registration District ( 1837 - 1935 )
Ticehurst Registration District ( 1837 - 1935 )
Uckfield Registration District
West Firle Registration District ( 1837 - 1935 )
Westbourne Registration District ( 1837 - 1935 )
Westhampnett Registration District ( 1837 - 1935 )
Worthing (early) registration district ( 1837 - 1869 )
Worthing (late) registration district ( 1935 - 1974 )
Rural district
Battle Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
Chailey Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
Chanctonbury Rural ( 1933 - 1974 )
Chichester Rural ( 1933 - 1974 )
Cuckfield Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
East Grinstead Rural ( 1894 - 1934 )
East Preston Rural ( 1894 - 1933 )
Eastbourne Rural ( 1894 - 1934 )
Hailsham Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
Hastings Rural ( 1894 - 1934 )
Horsham Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
Midhurst Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
Newhaven Rural ( 1894 - 1934 )
Petworth Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
Rye Rural ( 1894 - 1934 )
Steyning East Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
Steyning West Rural ( 1894 - 1933 )
Thakenham Rural ( 1894 - 1933 )
Ticehurst Rural ( 1894 - 1934 )
Uckfield Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
Westbourne Rural ( 1894 - 1933 )
Westhampnett Rural ( 1894 - 1933 )
Worthing Rural ( 1933 - 1974 )
Unknown
Albourne
Alciston
Aldrington
Alfold
Almodington
Ambersham
Appledram
Arlington
Ashburnham
Ashington
Ashurst
Balsdean
Barlavington
Barnes
Barnham
Bayham
Beddingham
Bepton
Berden
Berwick
Binderton
Binsted
Birdham
Bishopstone
Blackham
Blatchington (near Brighton)
Bodle-Street
Botolphs
Brede
Broadwater
Broomhill
Buddington
Bunckton
Buncton
Burpham
Burton
Camelsdale
Chalvington
Charlton
Chithurst
Cliffe
Cliftonville
Climping
Coates
Cocking
Coldwaltham
Coleman's Hatch
Colgate
Compton
Coolham
Cowdray
Crowhurst
Danehill
Danny Park
Denton
Didling
Donnington
Duncton
Durrington
Earnley
Eartham
Easebourne
East Blatchington
East Chiltington
East Dean
East Lavant
East Lavington
East Marden
Eastergate
Ebernoe
Edburton
Egdean
Elsted
Ewhurst
Farnhurst
Firle
Fletching
Flimwell
Folkington
Ford
Framfield
Frant
Fulking
Funtington
Glynde
Goring
Gostrow
Graffham
Greatham with Wiggonholt
Greatham
Guestling
Hadlow-Down
Hamsey
Handcross
Hangleton
Harting
Heene
Heighton
Hellingly
Heyshott
Hollington
Hollycombe
Houghton
Hurst Green
Iden
Iford
Ilford
Iping
Itchingfield
Jevington
Kingston
Kingston-by-Lewes
Kirdford
Laughton
Lavant
Linch
Linchmere
Little Horsted
Littlington
Lodsworth
Lower Beeding
Loxwood
Lullington
Madehurst
Manning's Heath
Merston
Mid Lavant
Middleton on Sea
Milland
Mortlake
Mountfield
New Fishbourne
Newtimber
North Bersted
North Marden
North Stoke
Northchapel
Nuthurst
Nutley
Old Fishbourne
Ovingdean
Parham
Patching
Peasemarsh
Penhurst
Pett
Piddinghoe
Playden
Poling
Portfield
Preston
Pyecombe
Rackham
Racton
Ripe
Rodmell
Rotherfield
Roughey
Rudgwick
Saltdean
Salvington
Selham
Selmeston
Shermanbury
Shipley
Shripney
Silverhill
Slaugham
Slindon
Slinfold
South Bersted
South Malling
South Stoke
Southbourne
Southease
St. Johns-Common
Stanmer
Stanstead Park
Stansted
Staplefield Common
Stedham
Stonegate
Stopham
Stoughton
Streat
Sullington
Sutton
Tangmere
Tarring Neville
Tarring
Telscombe
Terwick
Thakenham
Tillington
Toddington
Tortington
Trotton
Turner's-hill
Twineham
Up Marden
Up Park
Up Waltham
Upper Dicker
Walberton
Waldron
Warnham
Warningcamp
Wartling
West Blatchington
West Chiltington
West Dean (near Chichester)
West Dean (near Seaford)
West Grinstead
West Hoathly
West Itchenor
West Lavington
West Stoke
West Tarring
West Thorney
West Wittering
Westham
Wiggonholt
Wisborough Green
Wiston
Wivelsfield
Woodmancote
Yapton
Urban district
Battle
Bognor Regis
Burgess Hill
Crawley
Cuckfield
East Grinstead
Haywards Heath
Horsham
Littlehampton
Newhaven
Portslade
Seaford
Shoreham by Sea
Southwick
Uckfield
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Sussex (; abbreviated Sx), from the Old English Sūþsēaxe ('South Saxons'), is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. Clockwise, it is bounded to the west by Hampshire; north by Surrey, north-east by Kent, south by the English Channel and is divided for local government into West Sussex and East Sussex and the city of Brighton and Hove. Brighton and Hove was created as a unitary authority in 1997, and was granted City status in 2000. Until then, Chichester had been Sussex's only city.

Sussex has three main geographic sub-regions, each oriented approximately east to west. In the south-west of the county lies the fertile and densely populated coastal plain. North of this lie the rolling chalk hills of the South Downs, beyond which lies the well-wooded Sussex Weald.

The name 'Sussex' derives from the Kingdom of Sussex, according to legend it was founded by Ælle of Sussex in 477 AD, then in 825 it was absorbed into the kingdom of Wessex and the later kingdom of England. The region's roots go back further to the location of some of Europe's earliest hominid finds at Boxgrove. Sussex has been a key location for England's major invasions, including the Roman invasion of Britain and the Battle of Hastings.

In 1974, the Lord-Lieutenant of Sussex was replaced with one each for East and West Sussex, which became separate ceremonial counties. Sussex continues to be recognised as a geographical territory and cultural region. It has had a single police force since 1968 and its name is in common use in the media. In 2007, Sussex Day was created to celebrate Sussex's rich culture and history. Based on the traditional emblem of Sussex, a blue shield with six gold martlets, the flag of Sussex was recognised by the Flag Institute in 2011. In 2013, Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government Eric Pickles formally recognised and acknowledged the continued existence of England's 39 historic counties, including Sussex.

Contents

History

Wikipedia has a summary of the history of Sussex up to the Norman period.

the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Norman Sussex

Sussex was the venue for the momentous Battle of Hastings, the decisive victory in the Norman conquest of England. In September 1066, William of Normandy landed with his forces at Pevensey and erected a wooden castle at Hastings, from which they raided the surrounding area. The battle was fought between Duke William of Normandy and the English king, Harold Godwinson, who had strong connections with Sussex and whose chief seat was probably in Bosham. After having marched his exhausted army all the way from Yorkshire, Harold fought the Normans at the Battle of Hastings, where England's army was defeated and Harold was killed. It is likely that all the fighting men of Sussex were at the battle, as the county's thegns were decimated and any that survived had their lands confiscated. William built Battle Abbey at the site of the battle, with the exact spot where Harold fell marked by the high altar.[1]

Sussex experienced some of the greatest changes of any English county under the Normans, for it was the heartland of King Harold and was potentially vulnerable to further invasion. The county was of great importance to the Normans; Hastings and Pevensey being on the most direct route for Normandy. The county's existing sub-divisions, known as rapes, were made into castleries and each territory was given to one of William's most trusted barons. Castles were built to defend the territories including at Arundel, Bramber, Lewes, Pevensey and Hastings. Sussex's bishop, Æthelric II, was deposed and imprisoned and replaced with William the Conqueror's personal chaplain, Stigand. The Normans also built Chichester Cathedral and moved the seat of Sussex's bishopric from Selsey to Chichester. The Normans also founded new towns in Sussex, including New Shoreham (the centre of modern Shoreham by Sea, Battle, Arundel, Uckfield and Winchelsea.[2]

In 1264, the Sussex Downs were the location of the Battle of Lewes, in which Simon de Montfort and his fellow barons captured Prince Edward (later Edward I), the son and heir of Henry III. The subsequent treaty, known as the Mise of Lewes, led to de Montfort summoning the first parliament in English history without any prior royal authorisation. A provisional administration was set up, consisting of de Montfort, the Bishop of Chichester and the Earl of Gloucester. These three were to elect a council of nine, to govern until a permanent settlement could be reached.

Sussex under the Plantagenets

During the Hundred Years War, Sussex found itself on the frontline, convenient both for intended invasions and retaliatory expeditions by licensed French pirates. Hastings, Rye and Winchelsea were all burnt during this period[3] and all three towns became part of the Cinque Ports, a loose federation for supplying ships for the country's security. Also at this time, Amberley and Bodiam castles were built to defend the upper reaches of navigable rivers.[3]

Early modern Sussex

Like the rest of the country, the Church of England's split with Rome during the reign of Henry VIII was felt in Sussex. In 1538 there was a royal order for the demolition of the shrine of Saint Richard, in Chichester Cathedral, with Thomas Cromwell saying that there was "a certain kind of idolatry about the shrine".[4] In the reign of Queen Mary, 41 people in Sussex were burnt at the stake for their Protestant beliefs.[5] Elizabeth re-established the break with Rome when she passed the 1559 Acts of Supremacy and Uniformity. Under Elizabeth I, religious intolerance continued albeit on a lesser scale, with several people being executed for their Catholic beliefs.[3]

Sussex escaped the worst ravages of the English Civil War, although in 1642 there were sieges at Arundel and Chichester, and a skirmish at Haywards Heath when Royalists marching towards Lewes were intercepted by local Parliamentarians. The Royalists were routed with around 200 killed or taken prisoner. Despite its being under Parliamentarian control, Charles II was able to journey through the county after the Battle of Worcester in 1651 to make his escape to France from the port of Shoreham.

Late modern and contemporary Sussex

The Sussex coast was greatly modified by the social movement of sea bathing for health which became fashionable among the wealthy in the second half of the 18th century.[2] Resorts developed all along the coast, including at Brighton, Hastings, Worthing, and Bognor.[2] At the beginning of the 19th century agricultural labourers' conditions took a turn for the worse with an increasing amount of them becoming unemployed, those in work faced their wages being forced down. Conditions became so bad that it was even reported to the House of Lords in 1830 that four harvest labourers (seasonal workers) had been found dead of starvation.[6] The deteriorating conditions of work for the agricultural labourer eventually triggered riots, first in neighbouring Kent, and then in Sussex, where they lasted for several weeks, although the unrest continued until 1832 and became known as the Swing Riots.[6]

Railways spread across Sussex in the 19th century and county councils were created for Sussex's eastern and western divisions (i.e., East Sussex and West Sussex) in 1889.

During World War I, on the eve of the Battle of the Somme on 30 June 1916, the Royal Sussex Regiment took part in the Battle of the Boar's Head at Richebourg-l'Avoué. The day subsequently became known as The Day Sussex Died.[7] Over a period of less than five hours the 17 officers and 349 men were killed, including 12 sets of brothers, including three from one family.[7] A further 1,000 men were wounded or taken prisoner.[7]

With the declaration of the World War II, Sussex found itself part of the country's frontline with its airfields playing a key role in the Battle of Britain and with its towns being some of the most frequently bombed. As the Sussex regiments served overseas, the defence of the county was undertaken by units of the Home Guard with help from the First Canadian Army.[8] During the lead up to the D-Day landings, the people of Sussex were witness to the buildup of military personnel and materials, including the assembly of landing crafts and construction of Mulberry harbours off the county's coast.[9]

In the post-war era, the New Towns Act 1946 designated Crawley as the site of a new town. As part of the Local Government Act 1972, the eastern and western divisions of Sussex were made into the ceremonial counties of East Sussex and West Sussex in 1974. Under the Planning Zone associated with Gatwick Airport and Crawley, under the Redcliffe-Maud Report, West Sussex gained an area formerly in East Sussex and the airport land itself from Horley and Charlwood in Surrey. This area became the Mid Sussex District from 1974.

Historical Governance

the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

The Kingdom of Sussex became the county of Sussex; then after the coming of Christianity; the see originally founded in Selsey, was moved to Chichester in the 11th century. The See of Chichester was coterminous with the county borders. In the 12th century the see was split into two archdeaconries centred at Chichester and Lewes.

Since its creation in the fifth century, Sussex has been subject to periodic reform of its local governance. After the Reform Act of 1832 Sussex was divided into the eastern division and the western division, these divisions were coterminous with the two archdeaconries of Chichester and Lewes. In 1889, following the Local Government Act 1888, using those same boundaries, Sussex was divided into two administrative counties, East Sussex and West Sussex together with three self-governing county boroughs, Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings. In 1974, under the Local Government Act 1972, the county boundaries were revised with the mid-Sussex area of East Grinstead, Haywards Heath, Burgess Hill and Hassocks being transferred from East Sussex into West Sussex along with Crawley and the Gatwick area that was formerly part of Surrey. The county boroughs were returned to the control of the two county councils, but in 1997 the towns of Brighton and Hove were amalgamated as a unitary local authority and in 2000, Brighton and Hove was given City status.

In the early Norman period the county was divided into six new baronies, called rapes, each with at least one town and a castle. These were Arundel Rape, Chichester Rape (which were combined in early times), Bramber Rape, Hastings Rape, Lewes Rape and Pevensey Rape. The rapes were divided into hundreds as in other counties, and the hundreds were made of of parishes. The boroughs (larger communities, officially classified as "boroughs") were independent of the hundreds.

There is a map of the rapes, hundreds and boroughs in Wikipedia with a link to the original map in Wikimedia which is viewable or downloadable in a sufficiently large size to be read. WeRelate has a page for each rape, listing its hundreds and parishes in the form of a table.

At the end of the 19th century the county, like all other counties in England, was divided into urban and rural districts, in addition to the county and municipal boroughs which had existed since 1835.

In 1974 the county was divided into the two ceremonial counties of East Sussex and West Sussex and each of these counties abolished the earlier structure and joined all the local government administrations into "district municipalities". These are listed under East Sussex and West Sussex.

Research Tips


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Sussex. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at History of Sussex. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.