Person:Samuel McClung (3)

Watchers
Capt. Samuel McClung, of Muddy Creek
m. Abt. 1726
  1. John McClung, "Curly John" of Bath County, VAabt 1731 - 1830
  2. Thomas McClung, of the Battle of Point Pleasantabt 1734 - bef 1784
  3. James McClung1736 - 1790
  4. William "Grandfather Billy" McClung1738 - 1833
  5. Joseph "Sinking Creek Joe" McClungabt 1740 - 1836
  6. Capt. Samuel McClung, of Muddy Creek1743 - 1806
  • HCapt. Samuel McClung, of Muddy Creek1743 - 1806
  • WRebecca Bourlandest 1747 - 1825
m. 1769
  1. Sarah McClungabt 1774 -
  2. Joseph McClung1776 - 1850
  3. Maj. Andrew McClungabt 1780 -
  4. Capt. John McClung1782 - 1812
  5. Charles 'Straw Charlie' McClung1782 - 1858
  6. William McClung1785 - 1855
  7. Mary "Polly" McClung, widowbef 1789 - 1822
  8. Samuel McClung1790 - 1872
Facts and Events
Name Capt. Samuel McClung, of Muddy Creek
Gender Male
Birth? 1743 Augusta County, Virginia
Marriage 1769 Augusta County, Virginiato Rebecca Bourland
Death? 10 April 1806 Greenbrier County, Virginia[Estate Settlement]

Capt. Samuel McClung was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

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Early Land Acquisition in Botetourt County, VA

Acquisition of Land from USGenWeb Archives: [Note: Botetourt County was formed in 1769 from part of Augusta County]

  • Land Survey in Botetourt County, VA: McClung, Samuel; 1774, Mar. 1,; 406 acres on Mill Creek. [Note: part of Botetourt and Montgomery Counties became Greenbrier County in 1778]. Source: USGenWeb Archives

Records in Augusta County, VA

From Chalkley's: [unless otherwise listed]

  • Page 107.--17th September, 1771. William Dean's will--To wife; to daughter, Mary; youngest daughter, Elizabeth; son, John; to son, Adam, executor. Teste: Saml. McClung, Andrew Bourland, Sarah Bourland. Proved, 17th August. 1773, by McClung and Sarah Bourland. Adam Dean refuses to qualify. Administration granted Sarah, the widow, who qualifies (__ her mark) with Adam Dean, Saml. McClung.
  • Land Grant Survey - Page 269 - James Ewin, 122 acres, Middle River. Adjoining John McClung, Robert Patterson, Matthew Wilson, Samuel McClung. March 2, 1775. [Abstract of Land Grant Surveys, 1761-1791, Augusta & Rockingham Counties, Virginia, by Peter Cline Kaylor, pg. 92-93].
  • Page 198.--16th July, 1788. Commission to George Clendenin and Samuel McClug, gent., Justice of Greenbrier, to take privy examination of Elizabeth, wife of William Long, deed to Anthony Mustoe, dated September, 1786. Executed and returned, 20th July, 1788.

Estate Records

April 1806 - Samuel McClung, appraisal.
Source: Greenbrier Estate Settlements p. 202

Records in Greenbrier County, VA

  • 1780: No Indian attacks were documented for Hamilton’s Fort although there was an attack nearby in April 1780. Testimony of pensioner John Patterson suggests that this attack involved seven to nine Indians who attacked the home of Lt. Samuel McClung on Muddy Creek, wounding him, and further downstream, the home of James Monday (possibly the same as the James Mooney shown in the Appendix). West Virginia Culture website
  • April 1781 - Greenbrier Court Orders - Ordered that James Huston, Saml. McClung and James Thompson do view the way from Thos. Kincaid's Sand on Muddy Creek to James Huston's and make report to the Court of the rightest and best way. [Greenbrier County Order Books, Vol A-C, 1780-1797, Ancestry.com]
  • 22 Sept. 1781 - Greenbrier County Court Minutes: This Court doth appoint Samuel McClung Surveyor of the Road from Kincaid's Cabbin to James Thompson's over Muddy Creek Mountain and the inhabitants of Muddy Creek are to assist him in opening said Road as laid off by Samuel McClung, James Huston and James Thompson and keeping the same in repair. [Greenbrier County Order Books, Vol A-C, 1780-1797, Ancestry.com]
  • 22 August 1782 - Greenbrier County Court Minutes: Samuel McClung is appointed Captain of the Militia on Muddy Creek in the Room of William Hamilton who is appointed Major, James Garrett Lieutenant the Richard Humphries Ensign. [Greenbrier County Order Books, Vol A-C, 1780-1797, Ancestry.com]

Image:Samuel McClung appointed Captain 22 Aug 1782.jpg

  • 1783: Only two men in the 1783 Sinking Creek neighborhood were taxed for slaves – Joseph McClung (one slave), and Andrew Donnally (nine slaves). In the Muddy Creek community, five men were taxed for slaves – William Feamster (two slaves), William Morris (three slaves), Samuel McClung (two slaves), Thomas Kincaid (one slave), and John Wilson (two slaves). Cattle and horse ownership were much more common and dispersed across the two communities, with Sinking Creek farmers owning between zero and 25 cattle, with a mean of seven cows, and zero to 20 horses, with a mean of seven horses. The larger horse owners in Sinking Creek included Andrew Donnally (15), James Donnally (20), John Flinn (15), James Hughart (18), Joseph McClung (20), Thomas McClung (13), James McCoy Jr (13), William McCoy (15), and John Patton (11). The larger cattle owners included most of these same men plus William Cavendish (15) and William Fullerton (12). Muddy Creek farmers owned a similar range of zero to 24 cattle and zero to 20 horses, with a mean of five cattle and six horses. The larger horse owners were James Jarrett (13), Michael Keeny (14), Thomas Keeny (10), Samuel McClung (20), and James Patterson (10). Large cattle owners included most of these same men plus William Hamilton (22), Martin Keyser (24), Peter Shoemaker (13), John Viney (16), William Morris (12), Thomas Carraway (12), Richard Humphries (15), and Conrad Yocum (22). West Virginia Culture website
  • 20 May 1783 - Greenbrier County Court Minutes: William McCoy, James Knox, George Clendenin, James Thompson, Andw. Woods, Samuel McClung and Thomas Wright took the Oath of Captain of the Militia for this County according to law. [Greenbrier County Order Books, Vol A-C, 1780-1797, Ancestry.com]
McClung, Charles [brother of Samuel]
McClung, James [brother of Samuel]
McClung, Joseph [brother of Samuel]
McClung, Sam.
McClung, Tho. [brother of Samuel]
McClung, Wm. [brother of Samuel]
  • 1785 Taxable Property List, Greenbrier County, VA - Joseph McClung, Agnes McClung, Sam'l. McClung. Source: GenealogyTrails.com [Note: Agnes McClung was the widow of Thomas McClung, Samuel's brother, who had died in the previous year]
  • 1787 - Greenbrier County Land Tax List - Samuel McClung. Ancestry.com
  • 21 February 1787 - Greenbrier County Court Minutes: At a Court continued and held for Greenbrier County the 21st day of February 1787. Present: John Anderson, William Poage, Samuel Williams & Samuel McClung, Gentlemen. [Greenbrier County Order Books, Vol A-C, 1780-1797, Ancestry.com]
  • 1788 - Greenbrier County Land Tax in John Anderson's District: William McClung, George McClung, Samuel McClung. [Note: who is this George McClung? Needs additional research]. [1]
  • 1792 - Greenbrier County Land Tax: McClung, Samuel. Ancestry.com

Information on Samuel McClung

http://www.gooddogproductions.com/family/pafg04.htm#50

Captain Samuel MCCLUNG [Parents] 1, 2 was born in 1744 in , Rockbridge, VA. He died on 10 Apr 1806 in , Greenbrier, VA. He was buried in 1 Mi W of Smoot, Greenbrier, VA. He married Rebecca BOURLAND.

Rebecca BOURLAND 1, 2.Rebecca married Captain Samuel MCCLUNG.

References
  1.   .

    No Indian attacks were documented for Hamilton’s Fort although there was an attack nearby in April 1780. Testimony of pensioner John Patterson suggests that this attack involved seven to nine Indians who attacked the home of Lt. Samuel McClung on Muddy Creek, wounding him, and further downstream, the home of James Monday (possibly the same as the James Mooney shown in the Appendix). Monday was mortally wounded and his wife and child captured. Captain Hamilton found Monday and took him to Hamilton’s Fort, where he died. Patterson recalled in his pension application that William Hamilton had sent out a warning to the Big Levels area, and a call for reinforcements, but we have found no mention of further action from this raid. As noted above, Capt. Hamilton did fear his fort might be attacked in May 1778, and moved his garrison to the larger Arbuckle’s Fort.

    http://studylib.net/doc/8231396/colonizing-contested-areas-in-the-greenbrier-valley-of-we...