Person:Samuel Semple (4)

     
Capt. Samuel Semple, ASST QTR MR
b.abt 1725
m. abt 1711
  1. Elizabeth Sempleabt 1718 - 1780
  2. Capt. Samuel Semple, ASST QTR MRabt 1725 - 1808
  3. Moses Samples, Sr.1730 - 1824
  4. Hannah Sampleabt 1731 - 1814
  5. Robert Semple1733 - 1808
  6. Susanna Samplesabt 1741 -
  7. William Sempleabt 1742 -
  8. Sarah Samplesabt 1743 -
  • HCapt. Samuel Semple, ASST QTR MRabt 1725 - 1808
  • WUnknown
m. 1754
  1. Samuel Samples, Jr.1754 - 1839
  2. David Semple1757 - 1841
m. 26 May 1761
  1. Benjamin Sempleabt 1761 -
  2. John Sempleabt 1765 -
  3. David Samplebet 1769-1774 - 1829
  • HCapt. Samuel Semple, ASST QTR MRabt 1725 - 1808
  • WSarah Fowlerabt 1743 - 1801
m. 01 Apr 1776
  1. Juliet Semple, "2nd wife of Steel Semple"abt 1780 - 1808
Facts and Events
Name Capt. Samuel Semple, ASST QTR MR
Alt Name Samuel Sample
Alt Name Samuel Samples
Gender Male
Birth? abt 1725 Hereditary Sempill Lords of Blackburn, Kirkhouse, and Long Dreghorn & Clan Sempill
Marriage 1754 to Unknown
Property[2] 02 Mar 1756 Augusta, Virginia, United StatesSamuel Semple, 300 acres, Augusta County, bounded by the South Side of Hunter's spring. Paid 30 Shillings.
Property[13] 17 Nov 1756 Augusta, Virginia, United StatesRev. Alexander Miller purchased 300 acres of land from Samuel Semple for a consideration of 90 shillings.
Marriage 26 May 1761 Peaked Mountain Church, Augusta County, Virginiato Hannah "Annie" "Ann" Copeland
Alt Marriage 26 May 1761 Augusta, Virginia, United StatesPeaked Mountain Church by Rev. Alexander Miller
to Hannah "Annie" "Ann" Copeland
Other? 1768 Bedford, Pennsylvania, United StatesTax Assessment
Property[3][37] 24 May 1769 Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, United StatesAccording to the book of field-notes as identified to be in the handwriting of Colonel Alex. M'Lean, deputy surveyor, being field notes, entitled "Samuel Semple's land, Samuel Semple already owned land within the land tract owned by Thomas Penn and Richard Penn before the Survey of 24th May 1769
Occupation[6][33] 1770 Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, United StatesAssitant Quartermaster, Innkeeper and Tavern Owner.
Marriage 01 Apr 1776 to Sarah Fowler
Property[21] 13 Aug 1782 Augusta, Virginia, United StatesLand Office Military Warrant No. 1325 granted by the State of Virginia to Samuel Sample for military service performed by said Sample in the War between Great Britain and France, calling for three thousand (3,000) acres of Land in said State of Virginia be granted him by the King of Great Britain, proclaimed in the year 1763.
Other[34][35][36] 17 Sep 1788 Fayette, Kentucky, United StatesPetition No. 52 for Division of Fayette County, Kentucky|, signed by Benjamin Samples, David Samples, John Samples, Samuel Samples, and Samuel Samples, Jr.
Property? 25 Aug 1797 Augusta, Virginia, United StatesSamuel Sample by Deed Poll dated the twenty fifth day of August one thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven conveyed to the said Robert Hunter. To have and to hold the said Warrant together with the Lands surveyed.
Property[21] 30 May 1803 Augusta, Virginia, United StatesRobert Hunter's Land to be surveyed upon the same to the said William Finley Jr. his heirs and assigns forever. Whereof the said Robert Hunter have herunto set his hand and seal this thirtyith day of May one thousand eight hundred and three.
Death[9] 07 Feb 1808 Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, United States last will and testament of Samuel Sample (W.B. 1, p. 263, Allegheny County records) He left everything to his son-in-law, Steele Semple. Both Steele and Juliet Semple passed away before the will was contested c. 1813.
Religion[1] Episcopal Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, United StatesTrinity Episcopal Church
Burial[1] Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, United StatesTrinity Episcopal Church

Samuel Semple, Jr. was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

Contents

Welcome to
Old Augusta

Early Settlers
Beverley Manor
Borden's Grant
Register
Data
Maps
Places
Library
History
Index

……………………..The Tapestry
Families Old Chester OldAugusta Germanna
New River SWVP Cumberland Carolina Cradle
The Smokies Old Kentucky

__________________________

Early in Augusta County, VA

  • Chalkley, Lyman. Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish settlement in Virginia: Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County, 1745-1800. (Rosslyn, Virginia: The Commonwealth Printing Company, 1912-1913 in Three Volumes).S23 Samuel Semple Creditor
Page 287 - 17th November, 1758. Benj. Copland's estate settlement, by Ann Ralston (late Anne Copland). 19th March, 1755, former account. John Shaw's note (he ran away). Paid Thos. Pointer for one-half year schooling of Jacob and Mary Copland £1. Credits since 23d September, 1757--To Hannah Copeland, Sarah Copeland, Anne Ralston, David Ralston, Samuel Semple, Thomas Gregg, Samuel Hull, Robert Patterson, Edward McGeery, David Berry, Daniel Henderson, Peter Trader. (Note: Samuel married Benjamin Copland's daughter Hannah in 1761).S23
  • The Reverend Alexander Miller of Virginia and Some of His Descendants by Milo Custer (1910); pp. 4 - 6.S13
17th of November, 1756, Rev. Miller purchased three hundred acres of land of Samuel Semple for a consideration of ninety shillings. The boundaries of this tract as described in the record of the deed at Staunton, Virginia, are as follows: "Beginning at two Pines and a Hickory on the South side of the Hunters Spring, draft thence North West one hundred and Sixty Poles crossing a Branch and Meadow to two Pines and South thirty-five Degrees West one Hundred and eighty Poles to a Pine and South East Eighty-four Poles to two white (oaks?) and South two hundred and thirty Poles to two Pines and South East Sixty Poles Crossing a Branch to three White oaks and North Seventeen Degrees East three hundred and Eighty-five poles to the Beginning." This tract is situated in Rockingham County, Virginia, about four miles southwest of Harrisonburg. A peculiar clause relating to the property, probably required by the laws and customs of the time, was inserted in this deed as follows? "And during the full term and time of one whole year from thence next ensuing, and full to be complete and indeed Yielding and Paying therefor the Rent of one Pepper Corn on the feast of St. Michael the Archangel, if the same shall be lawfully demanded."?S13
  • Crozier, William Armstrong. Virginia Colonial Militia, 1651-1776. (New York, NY: Genealogical Association, 1905), Page 61, 62.S18
Virginia Colonial Militia, Augusta County, September 1758.
Officers: Colonel John Buchannan, Major John Brown, Major John Smith
Militia: - Saml. Semple on page 61. Moses Samble on page 62.S18
  • The Reverend Alexander Miller of Virginia and Some of His Descendants by Milo Custer (1910); pp. 4 - 6.S13
Rev. Alexander Miller served the congregation of Peaked Mountain as their pastor until October 7, 1762, and Cooks Creek until May 1, 1763. He was one of the ten members of Hanover, (Va.,) Presbytery when it was reorganized in 1758. He was appointed to several missionary stations in southwestern Virginia and western North Carolina in 1771, and the latest mention of him in the records of the Presbyterian Church in America is found in a report made to the Synod of Philadelphia by the Hanover Presbytery in 1774.S13
  • Chalkley, Lyman. Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish settlement in Virginia: Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County, 1745-1800. (Rosslyn, Virginia: The Commonwealth Printing Company, 1912-1913 in Three Volumes).S23
Acquisition of Land from Chalkley'sS23
Page 129.--17th February, 1761. Jeremiah (Jere) Harrison and Catherine to Samuel Semple, £22, 19 acres by patent, 10th April, 1759, at the great Spring on head of South Branch of Linvell's Creek; cor. Samuel Stewart's land. Teste: William Preston, George Skillern, William Anderson.
Page 158.--17th February, 1761. Jeremiah (Jere) Harrison and Catherine ( ) to Samuel Semple, £22, 270 acres patented, __ _____, 1760, on head waters of Linvel's Creek, whereon Samuel now dwells, joining Jost Hite, Samuel Stewart, Thomas Harrison.
Page 851.--22d March, 1765. Alex. Herring (Heron) and Abigail to Samuel Samples, £6, 38 acres on East Fork of Linville's Creek, between David Ralstone's and Samuel Harrison's land, Hite's land.
Disposition of Land from Chalkley'sS23
Page 341.--13th August. 1773. Samuel Samples and Hannah ( ) to Daniel Stover, 38 acres patented to Alexander Herring, 30th August, 1763.
Page 344.--13th August, 1773. part of 196 acres patented to Alex. Herring, 10th September, 1755.

Records in Carlisle, Pennsylvania

  • Pennsylvania, USGenWeb Archives, Statewide Land Records, in USGenweb Archives.S26
SAMPLE, Samuel on the 01 Aug 1766 applied for 300 acres of land on the Little Juniata, adjoining land applied for by Joseph Silver of Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Francis Silver applied for the land in Carlisle, Pennsylvania on Apr 1, 1766.S26
SAMPLE, John 1 Aug for 300 acres adjoining land applied for by Robert SAMPLE on Apr 1, 1766.S26
SAMPLE, Robert 1 Aug for 300 acres on Little Juniata adjoining land applied for Samuel Sample Apr 1, 1766.S26
  • Schaumann, Merri Lou Scribner. Taverns of Cumberland County Pennsylvania 1750-1840. (Lewisberry, Pennsylvania: Cumberland County Historical Society, 1994).S20
Samuel Semple also operated a Tavern in Carlisle, before operating the Tavern at Fort Pitt.S20
  • Newberry LibraryS15
30 Dec 1772 Order to Pay Samuel Semple - Order (Logstown, Pa., 1772 Dec. 30) instructing Robert Callender to pay Samuel Sample twenty pounds, and letter (Fort Pitt, 1781 Sep. 7) to an unknown addressee regarding the supply of provisions to Fort Pitt.S15

District of West Augusta Formed 1774

  • Virginia's governor, John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore, traveled to Pittsburgh, which Virginia claimed as part of its territory, to appoint government officials under the Virginia charter. In 1774, the Virginia assembly separated the western portion of Augusta County's territory and formed the District of West Augusta.S24
  • Montgomery, Thomas Lynch (editor). Pennsylvania Archives. 6th Series, Vol. 2, Page 3. Harrisburg Publishing Company, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 1906.S22
Committee Of Observation - 16 May 1775
"At a meeting of the inhabitants of that part of Augusta County that lies on the west side of the Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania), at Pittsburgh, the 16th day of May, 1775, the following gentlemen were chosen a committee for the said district, viz.: George Croghan, John Campbell, Edward Ward, Thomas Smallman, John Canon, John McCullough, William Goe, George Vallandigham, John Gibson, Dorsey Pentecost, Edward Cook, William Crawford, Devereux Smith, John Anderson, David Rogers, Jacob Van Meter, Henry Enoch, James Ennis, George Wilson, William Vance, David Shepherd, William Elliott, Richmond Willis, Samuel Semple, John Ormsby, Richard McMaher, John Nevill, and John Swearingen." Geography: District of West Augusta included all that part of Pennsylvania east of the Allegheny and Ohio, south of the Indian boundary line at Kittanning, Pennsylvania and west of the Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania). Yohogania County included that part of District of West Augusta north of the mouth of Cross Creek and the point where Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania) crosses the south line of Pennsylvania.S22

British Military Service 1763

  • Smith, James. A Treatise on the Mode and Manner of Indian WarS25
A couple of times, James Smith and John Ormsby (Pittsburgh) respectfully enshrine a Virginian, Lemuel Barrett who was in charge of a small group of Pennsylvania Rangers that left Carlisle in 1763. It was Lemuel Barrett's scheme that had made Captain Henry Bouquet's reputation a success at the Battle of Bushy Run. Bouquet arrived at Fort Bedford on July 25. Before continuing west, he raised a company of 14 rangers, commanded by Captain Lemuel Barrett, to act as scouts, complaining "the Highlanders lose themselves in the Woods as soon as they got out of the Road." The Higlander's Smith refered to here are the 42nd Regiment of Foot and the 77th Regiment of Foot (Montgomerie's Highlanders), which were a British relief column of 500 soldiers, left Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to relieve Fort Pitt, then under siege by indians led by Guyasuta.S25
[1] Barrett's insight that the way to get Indians to commit themselves on the battlefield is to appear to be disintegrating, is incorporated in James' schema in an incidental way. That is, James Smith says that even if there is a collapse of part of the square in which the soldiers are fighting and the Indians rush in, they will be rushing deeper into a trap.S25
Source - [1] J. Smith, Treatise, 6-7, 21.S25 While not perfectly clear, it seems likely that Ensign Smith was talking of Captain Henry Bouquet's command at Bushy Run when he wrote: "they knew no more about fighting Indians, than Indians do about ship building." Treatise, 52.S25
Military Warrant No. 1325 granted to Saml. Sample for 3,500 acres of land.S21
"three thousand acres of land due unto the said Saml. Sample for Military service performed by him as a Captain in the late war between Great Britain and France according to the terms of the King of Great Britain proclaimed of 1763."S21
This land was later sold by said Samuel Sample to Robert Hunter.S21
It was later proved in 1780 Yohogania County Court Records to the satisfaction of the court that Samuel Semple served as a Captain in a Corps of Rangers in Pennsylvania.

Suspected British 'Loyalist' Spy 1776

  • Peter Force. American Archives: Origin, Settlement, and Progress of the Colonies in North America, Series 4, Volume 5, Page 0734, 02 Apr 1776.S4
Order to Arrest Samuel SempleS4
Page v5:734S4
In Committee of Safety, April 2, 1776.S4
Present: James Mease, Chairman, Robert White, James Biddle, Owen Biddle, Thomas Wharton, Jun., Daniel Roberdeau, Samuel Howell, George Clymer.S4
The Congress having sent to this Board, by Mr. Wilson, an information, in writing, against Samuel Sample, an inhabitant of Pittsburgh, supposing him to have some connections with Dr. Connolly, a prisoner in the Jail of this County, dangerous to the safety of America, and requesting this Board to take such steps as they think best for the publick service, — this Board did, in consequence of said request, send a letter this day by express to the Committee of Cumberland County, (enclosing a copy of the said intelligence and Resolve of Congress relative thereto,) desiring they would use their utmost endeavours to stop the said Sample, with his servant and a boy be took with him, and examine their clothes, saddles, &c., for any letter they may have; and if he, the said Sample, his servant, or boy, is found to have in their possession any letters or papers inimical to the liberties of America, that the letters or papers be sent immediately to this Committee, and their persons be detained in safe custody until the further orders of this Board.S4
  • Tousey, Thomas Grant. Military history of Carlisle and Carlisle Barracks. (Richmond: Dietz Press, 1939), Pages 73, 74, 1939.S11
Samuel Semple Arrested in Carlisle, Cumberland, PennsylvaniaS11
Pages 73, 74 - Military History of Carlisle and Carlisle Barracks by Thomas Grant Tousey - Section II. Revolutionary War period - It was also found that secret agents of the English Army were going about from place to place, wherever English prisoners were confined, and were contacting those on parole to the detriment of the public cause. An English officer confined at Carlisle, with whom these agents were often seen, was Captain Peacocks. Three of these agents, Samuel Semple, John Morgan and John Waters were arrested in Carlisle and searched. No incriminating papers were found on any of them but other matters of importance were learned, among which was that a tavern about ten miles east of Carlisle (Dillsburg) operated by one, Colonel Callender, was a rendezvous for these enemy agents.S11
  • Newspaper: Pennsylvania Gazette dated 2 Oct 1776.
Robert Callender, who operated a tavern as a rendezvous point for Loyalists and Tories, was the original landowner on which Silver Spring Tavern is built. He died in 1776. The executors wrote in the Pennsylvania Gazette dated 2 Oct 1776,
"TO BE SOLD - 1,200 acres of excellent limestone land situated in East Pennsborough Twp. on great road leading from Harris Ferry to said town of Carlisle whereon are erected and built an excellent merchant mill and sawmill adjacent... now in tenure of Mr. Francis Silver, on a never failing stream of water known by name of Silver Spring. Oliver Pollock purchased the property.
Reverend Manasseh Cutler traveling to the Northwest Territory stopped at the tavern. He was the founder of Marietta, Ohio. He says "We went 7 miles from the Susquehanna River to Pollock’s Tavern. A fat Irishman gave us a grand dinner, but one horse fared badly; intolerably dear."
During David Brigg’s tenure as tavernkeeper, a disastrous fire occurred. It was reported in the 11 Nov 1796 edition of Klines - "CONFLAGRATION - the Silver Spring Tavern, property of Oliver Pollock, Esq., which was kept by Mr. Briggs, took fire and was consumed. Charles Smith, Esq., one of the lodgers and in adjoining room went where several Indian chiefs lodged who joined him in the cry to the other lodgers."

Thomas Girty Threaten's Sarah Sample

  • Holland, Wl J., editor, and J. B., associate editor Hatcher. Annals Of The Carnegie Museum: Publications of the Carnegie Museum. (Board Of Trustees Of The Carnegie Institute, 1901-), Vol. 1. The Records of Deeds for the District of West Augusta, Virginia: for the court held at Fort Dunmore (Pittsburgh, Pa.), 1775-1776.S27
16 Jul 1776 - Thomas Girty son, or brother to Simon Girty, Threatens Sarah (nee Fowler) SempleS7 wife of Samuel Semple.S17 S27
"Thomas Girty, being bound over to this Court on the Complt of Samuel Sample for Threatening to beat his wife Sarah Sample, and that he was afraid that the s'd Thos. Girty will beat or wound her, he being in fear of his Wife's Sarah's Life, being Called, appeared, and on hearing and Examining Several Witnesses the Court are of Opinion that on his makeing Con- cessions for his good behaviour towards her for the future be ' discharged."S27

Father's Estate Appraised

  • Chalkley, Lyman. Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish settlement in Virginia: Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County, 1745-1800. (Rosslyn, Virginia: The Commonwealth Printing Company, 1912-1913 in Three Volumes).S23
Vol. 3, Page 455, 05 Sep 1776 - Samuel Sample's Father's Estate is appraised - "Samuel Samples' estate appraised by Leonard Herring, Henry and Andrew Ewin -- Remainder of the time of Edward Walker."S23

American Military Service

28 Jan 1777 - Served in the 2nd Yohogania Battalion (Yohogania County) - Captain George Redman, 2nd Yohogania Battalion (Yohogania County) -
Lieutenant Charles Reed, Lieutenant Thomas Reed, Lieutenant Francis Reno, Ensign Lewis Reno, Private Abram Ritchey, Captain David Ritchey, Major Matthew Ritchie, Private William Ritchey, Lieutenant John Roadarmel, Captain John Robinson, Captain Philip Ross, Captain Samuel Semple, Captain James Scott, Lieutenant John Shannon, Private William Shaw, Private James Shearly, 13th Va., killed in service, Private Greenbury Shores, Private David Smith, Private Thomas Southwait, Samuel South, rank not stated, Walter Sparks, Oath of Allegiance, Captain Josiah Springer, Private Stewart, Colonel John Stephenson, Lieutenant James Stephenson, Ensign Marcus Stephenson, Captain Andrew Swearingen, Ensign David Steel, Lieutenant Michael Taggart, Major Henry Taylor, Lieutenant Levington Thomas, Lieutenant Andrew Tone, Colonel George Valandingham, Captain Joseph Vance, Ensign John Vanmeter, Captain Reason Virgin, Ensign Michael Vanbuskirk, first appointed by Gov. Horatio Sharpe to Cdl. Alexander Beall’s Corps, Maryland Militia, Ensign George Waddle (WeddIe), Private Richard Wade, Lieutenant Richard Waller, Ensign Thomas Warrin, Lieutenant James Wherry Acquila Whitaker, Oath of Allegiance, Lieutenant John White Aaron Williams, Oath of Allegiance, David Williams, Oath of Allegiance, Private John James Wood, Captain James Wright, Captain Joshua Wright, Captain Zadock Wright,
  • Fort Pitt Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Fort Duquesne and Fort Pitt. (Reed & Witting Co., Press), Page 44, 45.S28
01 June 1777 - Promotion of Brigadier General Edward Hand brought Hand back to Fort Pitt where he commanded American forces.S28
Feb 1778 - General Edward Hand led 500 Pennsylvania militiamen on a surprise winter march from Fort Pitt towards the Cuyahoga River, where the British stored military supplies which were distributed to Indian raiding parties. However, adverse weather conditions prevented the expedition from reaching its objective. On their return to Fort Pitt (Pennsylvania), Hand’s men attacked and killed peaceful Delaware Indian women and children. Because only non-combatants had been killed, (four women and a boy, of whom [only] one women was saved) the expedition became derisively known as the "Squaw Campaign". After returning to Fort Pitt and appalled by the "Squaw Campaign" incident, Simon Girty defected to the British along with fellow scouts Alexander McKee and George Elliot (i.e. Matthew Elliott).
  • De La Vergne, Earl W. Frontier defense on the upper Ohio, 1777-1778: Draper Series Vol. 3. (Oshkosh, Wisconsin: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, March 1912), Page 303-304. S29
01 May 1778 - Samuel Semple Served under Brigadier General Edward Hand for 3 months as a Private.S29
26 May 1778 - Lachlan McIntosh was given command of the Western Department of the Continental Army, headquartered at Fort Pitt. He established several new forts including Fort Laurens, named for his friend and mentor Henry Laurens.
  • Consul Willshire Butterfield. Washington-Irvine Correspondence: The Official Letters which Passed Between Washington and Brig.-Gen. William Irvine and Between Irvine and Others Concerning Military Affaris In The West From 1781 To 1783. (Madison, Wisconcin: David Atwood, 1882).S6
January 22nd, 27th 1779 - Samuel Sample, an assistant quartermaster, sent by Colonel Gibson from Fort Laurens to Coshocton, for corn and other articles, had one man killed, and another deperately wounded, by treacherous Delawares. The man killed was John Nash, of the thirteenth Virginia regiment; killed 22 Jan 1779. The man wounded was Peter Parchment, of the same regiment as Nash; wounded on the 27th Jan 1779; he finally recovered.S6
  • Mitchener, Charles Hollowell. Ohio annals: historic events in the Tuscarawas and Muskingum Valleys, and in other portions of the state of Ohio; adventures of Post, Heckewelder and Zeisberger, legends and tradition of the Kophs, mound builders, red and white men; adventures of Putnam and Heckewelder, founders of the state; local history, growth of Ohio in population, political power, wealth and intelligence.S30
12 Apr 1779 - Page 145 -BUCKSKIN CURRENOY AT Fort Laurens, Hleckewelder relates that in 1762, when he and Post were at Post's cabin, he dare not be seen by the Indians while writing or reading a book, they suspecting it had reference to taking their land. In 1779, they had the same antipathy to paper money, believing that it meant "steal" on its face. Hence, when they sold anything to the Fort Laurens garrison, there being no hard money there, they were paid in buck and doe-skin certificates, which they passed to the traders for whisky, anmunition, &c. In Colonel Morgan's journal is a certificate of the kind vouched for by Colonel Gibson in these words: I do certify that I am indebted to the bearer, Captain Johnny, seven bucks and one doe, for the use of the States, this 12th day of April, 1779. "Signed, Samuel Sample, "Assistant Quartermaster." "The above is due to him for pork, for the use of the garrison at Fort Laurens. "Signed, JOHN GIBSON, Colonel." The ground upon which Fort Laurens was erected, and around which so many historical incidents are located, is now part of the farm of the heirs of Henry Gibler, deceased, in the first and second sections of township ten, range two, about ten miles due north from New Philadelphia...S30
  • Revolutionary War Warrant Book 3, DLC:GW
10 May 1779 - From George Washington to Colonel Daniel Brodhead - "Capn Sample has received a warrant for 20,000 dollars for the recruiting service." George Washington's warrant book entry for this date includes a warrant for $20,000 to deputy quartermaster Samuel Sample (Revolutionary War Warrant Book 3, DLC:GW).
  • The History of Tuscarawas County, Ohio: containing a history of the county; its townships, towns, churches, schools, etc.; general and local statistics; military record; portraits of early settlers and prominent men; history of the Northwest Territory; history of Ohio; miscellaneous matters, etc. etc. (Chicago [Illinois]: Warner, Beers & Co., 1884).S31
June 1779 - Samuel Semple at the Comissary at Fort Laurens, Lawrence Township, Tuscarawas County, Ohio.S31
June, 1779, the fort was threatened by about 190 Indians and a few British soldiers, said to be under the leadership of Simon Girty, but the enemy, happily, moved off toward the Ohio without making the attack. Col. Brodhead wrote under date of August 4, 1779, that he had just learned of two soldiers being killed at Fort Laurena Heckewelder's narrative makes mention of the following loss of a soldier: "A Mr. Sample (ie. Samuel Semple), Commissary at Fort Laurens, went with a detachment of men to Goshocking [Coshocton] for the purpose of purchasing from the friendly Delawares, their grain and other articles. He pitched his tent opposite the village, leaving one of his men to take care of the camp and horses, and had scarcely crossed he river, which lay between his camp and the town, when the soldier left in charge was killed and scalped by some hostile Delawares, who fled with the horses. The next morning another soldier, returning from the Moravian village of Lichtenau, was fired at from a corn-field adjoining the path, had his arm broken and was pursued almost to the town before he could be relieved." "In the summer of 1779, says Taylor's History of Ohio, "Fort Laurens was threatened with another siege by forty Shawnees, twonty Mingoes and twenty Delawares, but by the interference of the friendly Delaware chiefs, they were persuaded to abandon the siege without firing a gun. It is worthy of notice that while there were only four Delawares (as distinguished from Munceys) at the attack in January, twenty were present on the last occasion, thus indicating that the influence of Capt. Pipe and the war party of the tribe was on the increase."S31
04 Aug 1779 - Samuel (Semple) Sample attacked - Page 137 - squads of Indians, twenty in each squad, going toward the Tuscarawas, and he hopes that the soldiers coming in from Fort Laurens will meet and scourge them." August 4, 1779, he wrote to General Washington that he "has just learned of two soldiers being killed at Fort Laurens." These were probably the two referred to by Heckewelder, who, in his narrative, says that in the summer of 1779 the commander at Fort Laurens sent a Mr. Sample, his commissary, with a squad of men to the forks of the Muskingum to purchase corn, and such provisions as could be obtained from the mission at Lichtenau (two miles below the Coshocton of this day), and from the friendly Delawares at Goshocking (Coshocton), where their capital was located. Sample pitched his tent on the opposite side of the river from the Indian village, leaving one soldier to guard his camp and horses, and crossed over to the town. In a short time the scalp yell was heard across the river, and hurrying to the river bank they saw hostile Indians going off with the horses and the scalp of Sample's soldier. On the next day another soldier was fired at and wounded. The Delaware chiefs sent out a force and recovered Sample's horses, and he returned to Fort Laurens with some provisions. August 6, 1779, Colonel Brodhead wrote to General Sullivan from Fort Pitt, who was then in command in northern Pennsylvania, that he was "daily expecting the garrison from Fort Laurens; when it arrived he would start on his campaign up the Cannewaga," and from the fact that his expedition up the Alleghany did start in a short time, it is certain the garrison left Fort Laurens in August, 1779, but there is no published record of the exact date the fort was abandoned. From all the facts about this Fort Laurens enterprise, it seems that Varnum's garrison had suffered so many privations that they took what we call at this day French leave" of the fort, and made their way back to the Ohio as best they could, in their starved condition, after burning...S31

Father's Estate Sale

  • Chalkley, Lyman. Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish settlement in Virginia: Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County, 1745-1800. (Rosslyn, Virginia: The Commonwealth Printing Company, 1912-1913 in Three Volumes). Will Book 6, Abstracts.S23
Page 132.--Vendue bill of Samuel Samples--Jacob Caplin, John Chasm, Elihu Messexs, James Floyd, Wm. Greagg, John McVey, Wm. Pettijohn, Wm. Perrigin, Margaret and James McVey, Felix Sheltman.S23
Page 136.--Settlement of Samuel Samples' estate--Paid heirs of Thomas Gregg, deceased.S23
November 1779 - Estate Sale of Samuel Semple Sr. - A son James McVey was born 1743 in Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. The son George McVey died before 1778. John McVey and parents attended the Samuel Samples sale in 1780 Augusta County, Virginia. James McClure McVey died in 1822 Franklin Co. Virginia. John died in 1823.Notes for JAMES MCVEY b. about 1712:James McVey (father of James McVey who was born in Lancaster County Pennsylvania) emigrated from Scotland with a colony of "Scots" who purchased land from William Penn in the Province of Pennsylvania and settled on the Juniata River near where there is now a town named McVeytown, through which the Pennsylvania Railroad later passed. (Note: The above information was taken from a loose sheet of family history in the McVey family bible by Helen (Burgess) McVey, wife of James Franklin McVey who was the 4th great grandson of James McVey who emigrated from Scotland.

Proved British Military Service

  • Yohogania County Court Records, p. 399, Augusta, Va.
28 Dec 1780 - Captain Samuel Semple's proof of service - Samuel Semple - On Dec. 28, 1780, & quote; "Samuel Semple proved to the satisfaction of the court that he served as a captain in a Corps of Rangers in Pa., in the service in the last war, and is entitled to land under the King's proclamation of 1763." & quote;

American Military Service Continued

  • Consul Willshire Butterfield. Washington-Irvine Correspondence: The Official Letters which Passed Between Washington and Brig.-Gen. William Irvine and Between Irvine and Others Concerning Military Affaris In The West From 1781 To 1783. (Madison, Wisconcin: David Atwood, 1882)S6
March 1781 - I have dismissed several civil staff officers. The only on retained is Mr. Samuel Sample, who has been doing the duty of quartermaster ever since Mr. Duncan was put under arrest. I am of opionion some person to act in that department is indispensably necessary; and having no cause to fault Mr. Sample's conduct, have continued him until the pleasure of congress is known.S6
Mr. Duncan mentioned above was David Duncan. He attended to Michael Huffnagle's (the contractor's) business at Fort Pitt. In March, 1781, Duncan was appointed by the supreme executive council of Pennsylvania, a commissioner of purchases for the county of Westmoreland. His duty was to supply the garrison at Fort Pitt and state troops called out for the defense of the border. Being charged with speculating in public funds, he had been put under arrest, but it appears, was soon after released. He had previously resigned. Mr. Sample's office was that of acting assistant quartermaster. He was an old resident of Pittsburgh, having kept a public house (nee Semple's Tavern) there as early as 1770.S6
30 Oct 1781 - Provided Provisions at Fort Pitt - "I do certify that I have purchased, received and delivered the above quantity of beef and flour to John Irwin, D. C. Gen’l of Issues, and as my receipts are given to the different persons to be paid in salt; and as there is no continental salt here, I beg that General Irvine will use his influence, if possible, to obtain the quantity of salt, so as I may be able to pay off the debts according to contract. Sam'l Sample. "I do certify that I received of Mr. Samuel Sample beef and flour to the full amount of the within account for the use of the continental troops." "FORT PITT, October 30, 1781. GEO. WALLACE, A. C. I."S6
03 Dec 1781 – Fort Pitt - Pages 158, 159 - The troops formerly of the eighth Pennsylvania regiment are no longer to be considered as a regiment, but a detachment from the Pennsylvania line. saries, one forage master, and one Indian interpreter. There remain yet Mr. [Alexander] Fowler and his clerk, who says he is yearly appointed by congress auditor of accounts, with three rations per day for himself and one for his clerk; and that he has not yet received a dismissal either from congress or the auditor general. I request express directions respecting this man ; and if he is to be struck off, an order to him to deliver all the stationery on hand; as I am informed he has a pretty good stock. "When this is done there will not be a man on the civil staff except Mr. Samuel Sample, who has been doing the duty of quartermaster ever since Mr. [David] Duncan was put under arrest. As I think there is an indispensable necessity for some person to act in that department, I have continued him till further orders. I have also struck off or rather changed the title of ten artificers and now call them fatigue men. Any person to look at the place and be told that a number of officers were employed, I believe they would rather imagine they were pulling down than building up or repairing...S6
12 Nov 1781 – Fort Pitt - Pages 162, 163 – Brigadier General William Irvine's Order directed to the acting assistant quartermaster, Samuel Sample, at Fort Pitt, and was in these words: “ Sir: You are hereby authorized and directed to dispose of all unnecessary and cast horses, the property of the United States, and other articles belonging to the quartermaster’s department at this post and its dependencies that are unfit for service or are likely to become so by decay or such as cannot be repaired at small expense to the public. Your articles of sale must be either for ready cash, specie, or forage, equivalent for the sum agreed for. In the execution of this business, I make no doubt you will do your utmost for the good of the public. Indeed, great economy is necessary in every department. The amount of these sales must be appropriated for procuring forage indispensably necessary for the support of the garrison. This information I think proper to give you that you may arrange matters accordingly. I am, sir, your obedient, humble servant. Signed Wm. Irvine, B. Gen'l.S6
On the 26th Semptember 1783, Brigadier General Irvine received a letter from the assistant secretar at war notifying him that a detachment of troops were on their way to relieve him from command at Fort Pitt, which he desired. He was authorized to furlough as many men of his garrison, leaving only those to remain as necessary. This he did, turning over the remainder to one of his captains, and on the 1st of October 1783, he started for his home in Carlisle. Before his departure, Irvine was presented with the following address:S6
Pittsburgh, September 30th, 1783S6
To Brigadier General Irvine, Comanding at Fort Pitt and its Dependencies - Sir: - The inhabitants of Pittsburgh having just learned that you intend to retire from this command tomorrow, would do injustice to their own feelings if they did not express their thanks to you, and their sense of your merit as an officer. During your command in this department, you have demonstrated that amidst the tumults of war, the laws may be enforced and civil liberty and society protected. Your attention to the order and discipline of the regular troops under your command, as well as to the militia, your regard to the civil rights of the inhabitants, the care you have taken of the public property, and your economy in the expenditure of the public money, we have all witnessed. This conduct, we assure you, has given general satisfaction to a people who, before your time, were, unfortunately for them, much divided, but now united. As you are now about to quit the military life (in which your ability and integrity have been so conspicuous), we wish you all possible happiness, and that your fellow citizens may long enjoy your usefulness in civil life, in which we doubt not you will deserve their utmost confidence. We regret that we were not sooner informed of the time you intended to set out, as we are confident the whole country would have, with pride, joined us in this or mor animated and better drawn-up address. We sincerely wish you health and a happy meeting with your family and friends at Carlisle; - and are, with great esteem and respect, sir your obedient and very humble servants, Signed:S6
John Ormsby
Devereux Smith
David Duncan
Daniel Elliott
Samuel Ewalt
George Walker
Joseph Nicholson
Samuel Sample
Alexander Fowler
William Christy
John Hardin
William AmbersonS6

Capt. Qtr. Mst. Samuel Sample Sr. to son Samuel Sample Jr. Land Record

  • Land Record Allegheny County, Pennsylvania
09 Dec 1789 - Land Record Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA: Land Record: Samuel Sample Jr. (son) accept 155.125 acres belonging to Patentee Samuel Sample Sr. (father) dated 09 Dec 1789. Returned 12 Dec 1789.

American Military Service Continued

  • Denny, Ebenezer, and Pennsylvania) Historical Society of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia. Military journal of Major Ebenezer Denny. (New York Times, 1971), Pages 174-175.S19
04 Nov 1791 - St. Clair's Defeat
19 Nov 1791 Edward Butler (soldier) He was a captain in the Second Regiment of Pennsylvania Levies under Major General Arthur St. Clair. According to the Military journal of Ebenezer Denny. After suffering a defeat at the Battle of the Wabash Major Denny writes, "In the evening take leave of our friends at Fort Washington and embark on board a fourteen oar barge. The boat's company consists of Captain Edward Butler and twenty-two of his men, who were raised about Pittsburgh, and for the sake of getting home have volunteered this service. Passangers are Captain Buel, of the second regiment, who arrived at Fort Washington some short time after the army marched from thence, and where he chose to remain. He is now returning home; and Adjutant Crawford and Quarter-master Semple, of the Pennsylvania levies (later known as 2nd Infantry Regiment (United States). Crawford is an old Revolutionary officer of some merit. He received a shot in the late action, which is lodged somewhere about the chest, but appears not at all disabled. Semple is a fine companionable man, who has seen better times. We promise ourselves as pleasant a passage as circumstances and the lateness of the season will admit." They reached Pittsburgh on the night of December 11, 1791.S19
  • Craig, Neville B. The History of Pittsburgh: With a Brief Notice of Its Facilities Of Communication And Other Advantages For Commercial And Manufacturing Purposes. (Pittsburgh: J. R. Weldin Company, 1917), 2nd Edition, Page 238.S32
Whiskey Rebellion (July 16, 17, 1794)
“The next morning, (July 17th) the assailants reappeared, five hundred strong, led on by one John Holcroft, who, under the assumed name of Tom the Tinker, had been deeply concerned in stirring up previous outrages against officers who attempted to enforce the law, and distillers who were disposed to submit to it. On the approach of his force, Neville escaped from the house, leaving his kinsman, Major Kirkpatrick, with the soldiers, to make such defense or capitulation as might seem expedient. The assailants had appointed a committee of three as directors of the enterprise, and they had chosen as commander on M’Farlane, formerly a lieutenant in the Continental service. The surrender of Neville was demanded, and, on information that he was gone, the admission of six men to search the house for papers connected with his office was claimed. This being refused, a flag was sent for the women to leave the house, soon after which an attack was commenced. M’Farlane was killed and several other of the assailants were wounded; but they succeeded in setting fire to the outhouses, and, as the flames threatened to spread, the garrison, three of whom had been wounded, found themselves obliged to surrender. The men were dismissed without injury, but all the buildings were burned to the ground. The marshal and the inspector’s son, who came up just after the surrender, were made prisoners (see footnote). The marshal was subjected to a good deal of abuse, and was only dismissed after a promise, extorted by threats of instant death, and guaranteed by young Neville, not to attempt to serve any more processes west of the mountains. The next day a message was sent to Pittsburgh, where the inspector and the marshal had taken refuge, requiring the one to resign his office, and the other to give up the warrants in his possession. This they refused to do. The means of protection at Pittsburgh were small; and…S32
______________
(footnote) Also, Major Craig, Ensign Semple, and another name not recollected.S32
  • Source Collection: Tennessee State Library and Archives: James Robertson Papers.
[No. 26] Protection of Western Counties Document Information Date August 8, 1794, Author Name Henry Knox (primary), Location: War Department. Recipient Name Isaac Craig (primary), Location: Pittsburgh, Summary "Assured Craig that the residents of the western counties were protected by the law from the insurgents, who recently staged an uprising. Noted governments attempts to pacify the insurgents." Document Format Autograph, Letter Signed, Source Collection: Tennessee State Library and Archives: James Robertson Papers.
08 Aug 1794 - Captain Samuel Semple Delivers Letters of Isaac Craig at Fort Pitt "Safely" to the War Department.
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Jessica Cox. The Life Of Pittsburgh's First Physician Dr. Nathaniel Bedford. (Allegheny County Medical Society), Pages: 21, 32, 43, 54., 2012.

    SOURCE URL: http://www.acms.org/the-life-of-pittsburghs-first-physician-dr-nathaniel-bedford/
    Mentions the Trinity Episcopal Church - John Ormsby and Semple ties - Although not mentioned in this writing, John Ormsby was a later proprieter of Semple's Tavern.

  2. Virginia Genealogical Society (Richmond, Virginia). Magazine of Virginia genealogy. (Richmond [Virginia]: Virginia Genealogical Society), Vol. 32, No.1, Page 94. Vol. 31, No. 3, Page 245.

    1. Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly
    Virginia Land Patent Book 32
    Vol. 32, No. 1, Page 94
    Samuel Semple, 300 acres, Augusta County, bounded by the South Side of Hunter's spring. Draft. 02 March 1756, p. 679. 30 shillings.

    2. Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly
    Virginia Land Patent Book 31
    Vol. 31, No. 3, Page 245
    Thomas Campble, 69 acres, Augusta County on South side the West Br. of Cook's Creek adjacent his own line and Samuel Semple, 10 September 1755, p. 649. 10 Shillings.

  3. Frederick Watts and Henry J. Sergeant. Reports of Cases Adjudged in The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. (Philadelphia: Kay & Brother, 193 Market Street. 1854.), Volume VII (43). Pages 458, 459, 460, 461, 462, 463, 464.

    == Payne v. Craft ==
    * Frederick Watts and Henry J. Sergeant. Reports of Cases Adjudged in The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. (Philadelphia: Kay & Brother, 193 Market Street. 1854.), Vol. 43, Pages 458 to 465. Payne against Craft.
    :Page 458 - Joel Payne and Sarah his wife against Lewis Heidleberg and James S. Craft. This was an action of ejectment for the recovery of 160 acres of land, more or less, situated in Pitt township. Heidleberg was a tenant, and James S. Craft the landlord of the premises. The plaintiffs claimed title on two grounds:

    :1. Through Juliet Semple, to the whole tract; or,

    :2. Through Steel Semple, to an undivided moiety. Juliet Semple was an only daughter of Samuel Semple, was born in or about the year 1780 (ie. 1761), and was married to Steel Semple, June 4th 1801. They had two children, viz., Edward, born June 8th, 1802, and Sarah, the present plaintiff, born September 1st, 1805. Juliet died in 1808; Steel Semple died intestate on the 16th April 1813; Edward Semple was the sole surviving heir of Juliet Semple. Sarah was married to Joel Payne, the plaintiff, in or about the year 1832.

    :The plaintiffs derived their title to an undivided moiety of the land Steel Semple in the following manner, viz. Juliet Semple was the second wife of Steel Semple. By his first wife he had two children, George and Catherine. George died intestate, unmarried and without children, about 1817. Catherine married...

    :More Transcript of Payne v. Craft37

  4.   Peter Force. American Archives: Origin, Settlement, and Progress of the Colonies in North America, Series 4, Volume 5, Page 0734, 02 Apr 1776.
    • Order to Arrest Samuel Semple

      :Page v5:734

      :In Committee of Safety, April 2, 1776.

      :Present: James Mease, Chairman, Robert White, James Biddle, Owen Biddle, Thomas Wharton, Jun., Daniel Roberdeau, Samuel Howell, George Clymer.

      :The Congress having sent to this Board, by Mr. Wilson, an information, in writing, against Samuel Sample, an inhabitant of Pittsburgh, supposing him to have some connections with Dr. Connolly, a prisoner in the Jail of this County, dangerous to the safety of America, and requesting this Board to take such steps as they think best for the publick service, — this Board did, in consequence of said request, send a letter this day by express to the Committee of Cumberland County, (enclosing a copy of the said intelligence and Resolve of Congress relative thereto,) desiring they would use their utmost endeavours to stop the said Sample, with his servant and a boy be took with him, and examine their clothes, saddles, &c., for any letter they may have; and if he, the said Sample, his servant, or boy, is found to have in their possession any letters or papers inimical to the liberties of America, that the letters or papers be sent immediately to this Committee, and their persons be detained in safe custody until the further orders of this Board.
  5.   Butterfield, Consul Willshire. History of the Girtys : being a concise account of the Girty brothers, Thomas, Simon, James and George, and of their half-brother, John Turner: also of the part taken by them in Lord Dunmore's War, in the western border war of the Revolution, and in the Indian war of 1790-95 : with a recital of the principal events in the West during these wars, drawn from authentic sources, largely original. (Cincinnati: R. Clarke and Co., 1890), Pages 46, 330, 331.

    Page 46 - But little is known of Thomas Girty at this period. At a term of the District of West Augusta court held at Pittsburgh on the 16th of January, 1776, he was compelled to enter into bond to keep the peace, he having been charged with threats against, and an assault upon, the wife of one Samuel Sample.

    Page 330, 331 - Some time previous to 1792, Thomas, with his family, moved across the Alleghany river, never returning to Pittsburgh to live. On the 22nd of May of that year, a white woman was captured by the Indians at Reed's block-house, twenty-five miles from Pittsburgh. During her captivity, which was brief (as she soon escaped), she was asked by one of her savage captors if she knew Thomas Girty; she said she did. The Indian then said that he (Girty) lived near Pittsburgh; that he was a good man, but not so good as his brother (Simon); but that his wife was a bad woman - she tells lies on the Indians, and is a friend to America. It is thus that the loyalty of the wife of Thomas was made known, strange to say, by a savage. He had heard the account of her probably from the lips of Simon; doubtless it was true. Except the forgoing, nothing has be preserved of Mrs. Thomas Girty. Her life-career is wholly unknown. Thomas died on Girty's Run. He had raised there and in Pittsburgh a respectable family. Two children - John and Nancy - The father breathed his last on the 3d of November 1820.

  6. Consul Willshire Butterfield. Washington-Irvine Correspondence: The Official Letters which Passed Between Washington and Brig.-Gen. William Irvine and Between Irvine and Others Concerning Military Affaris In The West From 1781 To 1783. (Madison, Wisconcin: David Atwood, 1882), Pages 31, 150, 151, 152, 154, 158, 159, 162, 163.
  7.   Kellogg, Louise Phelps. Frontier Retreat On The Upper Ohio, 1779-1781. (Bowie, Maryland: Heritage Books, 1994), Pages 224, 393, 394, 1917.

    Page 224 - Alexander Fowler came to America 1768 as Lieutenant in the Eighteenth British Infantry. About the year 1769-1770 the regiment was stationed at Fort Pitt, and in 1771-1772 at Fort Chartres in Illinois. There, Fowler was for a time commandant of the post at Kaskaskia. Sometime before the Revolution, Lieutenant Fowler retired from the army and became a permanent resident of Pittsburgh. He embraced the patriot cause, acting as auditor of military accounts and deputy judge-advocate for the Western Department. Fowler died soon after the close of the war. One of his daughters became the wife of Samuel Sample, the well-known inn-keeper of Pittsburg.

    Page 393, 394 – Brodhead Accused – Gen. George Washington to Alexander Fowler. Washington Papers. Draft. – Head Quarters New Windsor – 5th May 1781.

  8.   Charles W. Dahlinger. A Place of Great Historic Interest Pittsburgh's First Burying-ground. (Pittsburgh 1919), Vol. 2, No. 4. Page 218, 219 , October 1919.

    Chapter II. - The Pioneers of Pittsburgh - Page 218, 219 - Another of the earlier graves in this burying-ground was that of Joseph Nicholson, an Indian interpreter and scout, who died on October 1, 1796, at the age of 57 years. When quite young he had been a captive among the Indians, spoke several Indian dialects and was well acquainted with their customs, being an adopted member of the Six Nations. He was for many years interpreter for the garrison at Fort Pitt, both while in the occupancy of the British and later. He was the best known of all the interpreters and scouts on the western frontier, and had led a most adventurous life. He accompanied Washington on his journey from Pittsburgh to the Kanawha River Country in October, 1770. In 1774 he was one of Governor Dunmore's scouts in his war against the Indians. The story of his participation in the Indian dance which he and his brother, Thomas, and Simon Girty and his half-brother, John Turner, gave before Lord Dunmore, in which their Indian songs and yells are said to have "made the welkin ring," illustrates the intimate character of his knowledge of Indian life as well as his versatility (7). He was guide and interpreter for Colonel Brodhead in the summer of 1779, in that officer's campaign against the Indians of the Allegheny River Valley, where he was wounded (8). In 1782, with his brother Thomas, he guided the disastrous expedition against the Sandusky towns, which was led by Colonel Crawford (9). In 1790 he conducted Cornplanter, the principal chief of the Six Nations and several other Indian chiefs to Philadelphia to see President Washington, and was himself kindly received by his old employer of twenty years before. The Indians loved him and were grateful for his work in their behalf, and took advantage of this occasion by calling on Governor Mifflinand the Supreme Executive Council, and petitioning them to grant Nicholson six square miles of land "lying in the forks of the Allegheny and Broken Straw Creek," which included the land where the battle between Broadhead's men and the Indians had been fought, and which the Six Nations had already renounced to him (10).

    There were many notable graves in the Presbyterian churchyard. Mrs. Sarah Sample died in November, 1801, aged 58 years. She was the widow of Captain Samuel Sample who conducted the tavern at the northeast corner of Water and Ferry streets where Washington lodged in 1770, while on his way to the Kanawha Country, and who, as Washington related in his journal, kept "a very good house of public entertainment." In the Revolution Captain Samuel Sample was deputy quartermaster general in General Mclntosh's campaign against the Indians, in 1778-1779.

  9. Margaret Pearson Bothwell. The Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine: Edward Ward Trail Blazing Pioneer. (Pennsylvania, June 1960), Vol. 43. No. 2., 1960.

    Pages 114, 115
    The blow dealt both the Sample family and the Wards by Connolly's treachery must have stunned them. Samuel Sample, in 1776, felt constrained to visit John Connolly in jail in Philadelphia and, by so doing, had a web of suspicion woven around him (68)

    His sister, Susannah, Connolly's wife, probably had pleaded with him to make the visit and to pave the way for her to visit her husband (69)

    Any compassionate brother would have done the same thing. Susannah visited her husband in jail in July, and her plea to Congress in that month told of the plight in which she found herself.

    Her petition (70) to Congress was dated July 8, 1776. She signed it Susanna Connolly - Part of her petition follows "I must say I think it very cruel if I must be detained here from an only Child; and without any allowance for my subsistence, which is not deny'd even to those that have acted quite different from me who, from the natural ties of Affection came to see a Husband in Confinement, dangerously ill. If you imagine, Gentlemen, it is in my power to prejudice you in the Country, I am willing to be confined to Pittsburgh where my child is." She also pointed out that such a course would save the "unnecessary Expence" of supporting her in Philadelphia and would afford her the "Satisfaction of seeing" her child. The clouds of disgrace were darkening over the Ward and Sample families.

    Susannah's letter was referred to the Committee of Safety with the request that it "make proper provision for her till further order of Congress." (71)

    Footnotes:

    (68) Pa. Archives (First Series), IV, pp. 728-29.
    Colonial Records, X, p. 533. This relates to the action taken by the "Committee of Safety Philada 2nd April 1776" as a result of Samuel Sample's visit to Conolly.

    (69) Journals of Congress —Minutes of Monday, May 13, 1776. It was "Resolved, That Mrs. Connolly, wife of John Connolly, have leave to visit her husband in jail."

    (70) Pa. Archives, IV,pp. 782-83.

    (71) Ibid.

  10.   Hazard, Samuel. Pennsylvania Archive. First Series. (Philadelphia: Printed by Joseph Severns & Co., 1853), First Series (12 Volumes), Volume 04, Pages 728, 729.

    Pages 728,729 - Original Documents in the Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth, Commencing 1760

    Intelligence Received By Congress, 1776.

    Mr. Samuel Sample, an Inhabitant of Pittsburgh, and nearly Related to Mr. John Connolly, came to this City about a week ago. The day he arrived he went to the Jail, and was permitted to see and Converse with Mr. Connolly freely as well as with others in the like Situation, and was in several of their Appartments. A plan for a general escape of the State or Tory prisoners, It now appears, had been in contemplation among these prisoners sometime before. It happened, the day after Mr. Samples admission, that their whole scheme of escape was discovered; Upon this such Orders were given, that tho’ he applied to different members of Congress for leave, he cou’d not be allowed a second interview, which seemed to vex him a good deal. These circumstances, and his connection with Mr. Connolly, being known to several gentlemen now in Town, some of them from a regard of their Country’s safety, could not refrain from observing as follows.

    That a Stout full faced boy, about 14 or 15 years of age, has frequently, every day since an Intercourse was denied, waited on Mr. Sample, at his Lodgings, with letters or messages from the Jail. Mr. Sample has several times been questioned about the boy and his business with him, and has as often declared that he knew nothing about the boy, but that he is going up to Carlisle with him; notwithstanding his professed ignorance of the boy, it is known that he has engaged a horse to carry him, and to deliver the horse safe at Carlisle. The boy being asked if he was going along with Mr. Sample, said he was going to Carlisle with him; being asked if he wou’d go any farther, he answered with some hesitation, he believed he would go to Pittsburgh with him.
    It is well known that Mr. Connolly's great hopes of strength & support in his Designs are on the River and waters of the Ohio. It is humbley submitted to superior Judgment, whether letters from him to that country might not yet have a bad effect; wheter it might not be safer to send letters by a boy travelling with, or some distance before or behind a particular friend, than by the friend; whether upon some farther enquirey into the matter, It might not be proper to direct that both friend and boy should be very narrowly searched at some proper distance from the City. If these hints should tend in the smallest degree to promote the safety of the country, the writter of them gains his only aim.
    Mr. Sample setts off this day, April 2nd.
    In Congress, April 2, 1776.
    Resolved, that the enclosed be delivered by Mr. Wilson to the Com’ee of Safety of Pennsylvania, & request them to take such steps as they think best for the public Service.
    Chas. Thomson, Sec’y.

  11.   Tousey, Thomas Grant. Military history of Carlisle and Carlisle Barracks. (Richmond: Dietz Press, 1939), Pages 73, 74, 1939.

    Section II. Revolutionary War period - It was also found that secret agents of the English Army were going about from place to place, wherever English prisoners were confined, and were contacting those on parole to the detriment of the public cause. An English officer confined at Carlisle, with whom these agents were often seen, was Captain Peacocks. Three of these agents, Samuel Semple, John Morgan and John Waters were arrested in Carlisle and searched. No incriminating papers were found on any of them but other matters of importance were learned, among which was that a tavern about ten miles east of Carlisle (Dillsburg) operated by one, Colonel Callender, was a rendezvous for these enemy agents.

  12.   Historical Register:: Notes and Queries, Historical and Genealogical, Relating To Interior Pennsylvania. (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Lane S. Hart, Printer and Binder, 1883), Page 135, 1883.

    Page 135 - Journal of the "Whiskey Insurrection." Edited by Benjamin M. Nead. II. - Diary enry on the 12th
    ? - Having arrived at Fort Pitt at 2 o'clock - I soon after met with Capt. Gamble, and conducted us to our Quarters. Ellegant house 1/4 mile from the town. People of the best of Characters Boarded with us: a Mr. Sample, attorney at Law, with his Lady. I was exceedingly disappointed with regard to Society. I vainly anticipated a Country awkward Society. Mr. Sample I found an agreeable informed character, that of his lady handsome, was softness itself, conversant and Informed, (Daughter of Mr. Fowler.)

  13. Custer, Milo. The Reverend Alexander Miller of Virginia and some of his descendants. (1910), Page 4, 5.

    On the 17th of November, 1756, Rev. Miller purchased three hundred acres of land of Samuel Semple for a consideration of ninety shillings. The boundaries of this tract as described in the record of the deed at Staunton, Virginia, are as follows: "Beginning at two Pines and a Hickory on the South side of the Hunters Spring, draft thence North West one hundred and Sixty Poles crossing a Branch and Meadow to two Pines and South thirty-five Degrees West one Hundred and eighty Poles to a Pine and South East Eighty-four Poles to two white (oaks?) and South two hundred and thirty Poles to two Pines and South East Sixty Poles Crossing a Branch to three White oaks and North Seventeen Degrees East three hundred and Eighty-five poles to the Beginning." This tract is situated in Rockingham County, Virginia, about four miles southwest of Harrisonburg. A peculiar clause relating to the property, probably required by the laws and customs of the time, was inserted in this deed as follows? "And during the full term and time of one whole year from thence next ensuing, and full to be complete and indeed Yielding and Paying therefor the Rent of one Pepper Corn on the feast of St. Michael the Archangel, if the same shall be lawfully demanded."

  14.   Patrick Hogue (Samples). The Samples / Semples Family.

    Patrick Lawrence Hogue/Samples is the 5th great grand nephew of Captain Samuel Semple, Jr., the deputy quartermaster at Fort Pitt, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Their common ancestors are Samuel Semple, Sr., the 'Yeoman' and Susannah Wilkins.
    Hereditary Sempill Lords of Blackburn, Kirkhouse, and Long Dreghorn & Clan Sempill

  15.   Newberry Library.

    Institution: Newberry Library [non-circulating]

    Author: Gibson, John, 1740-1822.

    Title: Letter and payment order [manuscript] 1772-1781.

    Physical Description:
    2 items (1 folder) ; 33 cm. or smaller

    Summary: Order (Logstown, Pa., 1772 Dec. 30) instructing Robert Callender to pay Samuel Sample twenty pounds, and letter
    (Fort Pitt, 1781 Sep. 7) to an unknown addressee
    regarding the supply of provisions to Fort Pitt.

    Subject (LCSH): Callender, Robert.
    Gibson, John, 1740-1822.
    Manuscripts, American--Pennsylvania--Fort Pitt.
    Manuscripts, American--Pennsylvania--Logstown.
    Fort Pitt (Pa.)--History--18th century--Sources.
    United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--Equipment
    and supplies--Sources.

    Subject (Other): Pennsylvania Fort Pitt 1781 Manuscripts.
    Pennsylvania Logstown 1772 Manuscripts.

    Genre/Form: Correspondence--Pennsylvania--Fort Pitt--1781.
    Orders--Pennsylvania--Logstown--1782.

    Other Name: Callender, Robert.
    Edward E. Ayer Manuscript Collection (Newberry Library)
    Newberry Library. Manuscript. Ayer MS 322.

    Biographical/Historical Note:
    Soldier and Indian trader on the Pennsylvania frontier,
    1758-1782; post-Revolutionary War Alleghany County, Pa.,
    judge and militia officer; and secretary of the Indiana
    Territory, 1800-1816. From 1781-1782, Gibson was
    commanding officer at Fort Pitt.

    References: Butler, R.L. Checklist of mss. in the Ayer Coll., 322-323

    Notes: Forms part of the Edward E. Ayer Manuscript Collection
    (Newberry Library)
    1781 Sept. 7 letter formerly known as Ayer MS 323.
    For more information, consult the Special Collections Info.
    File.
    Ayer, Edward E.; gift; 1911.

    ______________________________

    Institution: Newberry Library [non-circulating]

    Location: Special Collections 4th floor

    Call Number: VAULT box Ayer MS 322

    Copy: 1

    Status: Available

  16.   Project Gutenberg's A Short History of Pittsburgh, by Samuel Harden Church.

    Project Gutenberg's A Short History of Pittsburgh, by Samuel Harden Church
    This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
    almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
    re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
    with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

    Title: A Short History of Pittsburgh
    Author: Samuel Harden Church
    Release Date: November 16, 2007 [EBook #23507]
    Language: English
    Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
    *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A SHORT HISTORY OF PITTSBURGH ***
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23507/23507-h/23507-h.htm

    IX. Washington made his last visit to Pittsburgh in October, 1770, when, on his way to the Kanawha River, he stopped here for several days, and lodged with Samuel Semple, the first innkeeper, whose hostelry stood, and still stands, at the corner of Water and Ferry Streets. This house was later known as the Virginian Hotel, and for many years furnished entertainment to those early travelers. The building, erected in 1764 by Colonel George Morgan, is now nearly one hundred and forty years old, and is still devoted to public hospitality, but the character of its patronage has changed from George Washington to the deck roysterers who lodge there between their trips on the river packets. At the time of Washington's visit the lower story of the house was divided into three rooms, two facing on Ferry Street, and the third, a large room, on Water Street, and in this latter room was placed, in the year of Washington's stop there, the first billiard table ever brought to Pittsburgh. The mahogany steps from the first to the second floors, which were once the pride of the place, are still in the house.[B] According to Washington's journal, there were in Pittsburgh in 1770 twenty houses situated on Water Street, facing the Monongahela River. These were occupied by traders and their families. The population at that time is estimated at one hundred and twenty-six men, women, and children, besides a garrison consisting of two companies of British troops.

  17.   Holland, Wl J., editor, and J. B., associate editor Hatcher. Annals Of The Carnegie Museum: Publications of the Carnegie Museum. (Board Of Trustees Of The Carnegie Institute, 1901-).

    Page 514 - George Washington at Semple's Tavern

    Page 527 - 22 Feb 1775 - David Semple, Gent, is recommended to the Gentn appointed to exam Attos., that he is a Person of Probaty, Honesty, and Good Demeanor.

    Page 533 - On the Motion of Sam'l Semple, It is Ord that his Mark be recorded a Crop of the right Ear and a Nick in the Edge.

    Page 534 - At a Court Con'd and held for Augusta County at Fort Dunmore Feby. 24th 1775. Licence to keep an Ordinary is granted to Sam'l Sample, he hav'g Comp with the Laws.

    Page 544 - 19 May 1775 - Admon of the Estate of Jacob Linnd, dec, Granted to Thos. Smallman, Gent, and Jacob Bousman, they having with Secy. Entered into & Ack'd Bond accr. to Law. Ord that Wm Christy, Ignace Lebath Sam'l Semple, and John Ormsby or any 3, app the Est.

    Page 549 - His Majesties Writ for adjorning the Court from Staunton to Fort Dunmore being read the 19th September, 1775: On the motion of Sam'l Sample, It is Ordered that his Serv't Woman, Betty McHolister, serve him 12 Mo; it App by Wits that she had a bastard, It is Ord that she Serve. Signed, GEO: Croghan

    Page 558 - 16 Jan 1776 - is the complaint against Thomas Girty threatening Samuel Sample's wife Sarah.

    Page 109 - Oct 1777 - On Petition of Sarah Sample setting forth that Ann McClean hath detained a Servant Girl, Ann Brook, to the great Damage of the Said Petitioner. Oredered that a Subpona do issue to summon the said Ann to the next Court.

    Page 214 - Ordered that sarah Shirly be admitted to administer on the estate of James Shirly Deceased, she Complying with the Law, Whereupon the sd. Sarah came into Court with her Securities & entered into Bond accordingly. - Ordered that Ignatius Lebat, Sam'l Sample, Sam'l Evalt & David Dunkin or any three of them Being first sworn do appraise the said Estate & make Report to next Court.

    Page 249 - At Court Continued and held for Yohogania County, August 24th 1778 - Ann Brook being bound over to answer the Stealing two pounds of Coffee from Sarah Sample appeared before the Court when no evidence appearing, Ordered that the same be dismissed.

    Page 252 - 25th August 1778 - Administration of Estate of Samuel Duncan Decd. is granted to David Duncan he having complied with the Law. Ordered that John Ormsby, Samuel Sample, Samuel Evalt and William Christy or any three of them being first sworn do appraise the personal Estate and Slaves if any of Samuel Duncan deceased, and make return to next Court.

    Page 266 - Ordered that Anne McClain be sommoned to shew cause why her Daughter Anne Jefferess, Should not be Bound to Samuel Semple, agreable to the Tenner of a Contract Between the said Ann and Sarah Semple wife of the said Samuel in the year 1770.

    Page 279 - Semple vs. Collings contd.

    Pages 280, 281 - Minutes of Court of Yohogania County - Colings vs. Sample Contd.; Sample vs. McKinzey Contd.; Sample & ux vs. McKay. Abates by Def. Death.

    Page 287 - Semple vs. Ferns, &c. Contd.

    Page 290 - Semple vs. E. Thompson Contd.

    Page 294 - McKenzey vs. Semple Contd.

    Page 297 - Semple vs. Owery Do. - Semple vs. Carrell Do.

    Page 306 - Semple vs. Collings Disd. N. Apr. - Collings vs. Semple D'd. N. Apr.

    Page 307 - Semple vs. McKinzie Contd.

    Page 308 - Felps vs. Semple Discontd.

    Page 316 - Semple vs. Ferns &c. Do.

    Page 318 - Semple vs. Thompson Discontd.

    Page 324 - Semple vs. Owens Do.

    Page 325 - Semple vs. Carrol Do.

    Page 364 - Semple vs. McKinzie Contd.

    Page 370 - Semple vs. Kerns Do.

    Page 376 - McKenzie vs. Semple Do.

    Page 378 - Semple vs. Owens Do. - Semple vs. Carol Do.

    Page 399 - Samuel Semple proved to the satisfaction of the Court that he served as a Captain in a Corps of rangers in the Pennsy'a. Service in the Last, and is Intitled under the Kings Proclamation of 1763.

    Page 409 - Indenture Mary Willson Samuel Semple proved ordered to be recorded

    Page 412 - Sample vs. McKensie do

    Page 417, 418 - Samuel Semple and others are recommended to the Governor as proper persons to be added to the Commission of the peace, and that the Clerk certify to The Govenor of the Names of those persons now named in the Commission of the peace who refuses to serve.

  18.   Crozier, William Armstrong. Virginia Colonial Militia, 1651-1776. (New York, NY: Genealogical Association, 1905), Page 61, 62.

    Virginia Colonial Militia, Augusta County, September 1758.
    Officers:
    Colonel John Buchannan, Major John Brown, Major John Smith
    Militia: - Saml. Semple on page 61. Moses Samble on page 62.

  19.   Denny, Ebenezer, and Pennsylvania) Historical Society of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia. Military journal of Major Ebenezer Denny. (New York Times, 1971), Pages 174-175.

    "In the evening take leave of our friends at Fort Washington and embark on board a fourteen oar barge. The boat's company consists of Captain Edward Butler and twenty-two of his men, who were raised about Pittsburgh, and for the sake of getting home have volunteered this service. Passangers are Captain Buel, of the second regiment, who arrived at Fort Washington some short time after the army marched from thence, and where he chose to remain. He is now returning home; and Adjutant Crawford and Quarter-master Semple, of the Pennsylvania levies. Crawford is an old Revolutionary officer of some merit. He received a shot in the late action, which is lodged somewhere about the chest, but appears not at all disabled. Semple is a fine companionable man, who has seen better times. We promise ourselves as pleasant a passage as circumstances and the lateness of the season will admit." They reached Pittsburgh on the night of December 11, 1791.

  20.   Schaumann, Merri Lou Scribner. Taverns of Cumberland County Pennsylvania 1750-1840. (Lewisberry, Pennsylvania: Cumberland County Historical Society, 1994).
  21. 21.0 21.1 Hogue, Patrick compiler. Virginia, United States. Chancery Records Index. (Virginia, United States: Library of Virginia), Pages 38, 39, 1802-1803., Pages 1 - 41.
  22.   Montgomery, Thomas Lynch. Pennsylvania archives. Sixth series. (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Harrisburg Pub. Co., state printer, 1906-1907), Vol. 2, Page 3.

    Committee Of Observation - 16 May 1775
    "At a meeting of the inhabitants of that part of Augusta County that lies on the west side of the Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania), at Pittsburgh, the 16th day of May, 1775, the following gentlemen were chosen a committee for the said district, viz.: George Croghan, John Campbell, Edward Ward, Thomas Smallman, John Canon, John McCullough, William Goe, George Vallandigham, John Gibson, Dorsey Pentecost, Edward Cook, William Crawford, Devereux Smith, John Anderson, David Rogers, Jacob Van Meter, Henry Enoch, James Ennis, George Wilson, William Vance, David Shepherd, William Elliott, Richmond Willis, Samuel Semple, John Ormsby, Richard McMaher, John Nevill, and John Swearingen." Geography: District of West Augusta included all that part of Pennsylvania east of the Allegheny and Ohio, south of the Indian boundary line at Kittanning, Pennsylvania and west of the Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania). Yohogania County included that part of District of West Augusta north of the mouth of Cross Creek and the point where Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania) crosses the south line of Pennsylvania.

  23.   Chalkley, Lyman. Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish settlement in Virginia: Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County, 1745-1800. (Rosslyn, Virginia: The Commonwealth Printing Company, 1912-1913 in Three Volumes).
  24.   District of West Augusta , in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  25.   Smith, James. A Treatise on the Mode and Manner of Indian War: Their Tactics, Discipline and Encampments, the Various Methods They Practice, in Order to Obtain the Advantage, by Ambush, Surprise, Surrounding, &c. Ways and Means Proposed to Prevent the Indians from Obtaining the Advantage ... Also a Brief Account of Twenty-three Campaigns, Carried on Against the Indians with the Events Since the Year 1755; Gov. Harrison's Included. (Paris, Kentucky: Lyle, Joel R. printer, 1812).
  26.   Pennsylvania, USGenWeb Archives, Statewide Land Records, in USGenweb Archives.

    Mostly "N" & "S" Surnames - Land Warrant Applications 1766: Various Counties. Transcribed and Copyrighted by Catherine Paystrup in April 2002.

  27.   Holland, Wl J., editor, and J. B., associate editor Hatcher. Annals Of The Carnegie Museum: Publications of the Carnegie Museum. (Board Of Trustees Of The Carnegie Institute, 1901-), Vol. 1.
  28.   Fort Pitt Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Fort Duquesne and Fort Pitt. (Reed & Witting Co., Press), Page 44, 45.

    On June 1, 1777, Brig. Gen. Edward Hand took command of the post and issued a call for two thousand men. He did not receive a very satisfactory response to this call. After considerable delay, he made several expeditions against the Indians, but was singularly unfortunate in his attempts. These fruitless efforts only emboldened the savages to continue their ravages.

  29.   De La Vergne, Earl W. Frontier defense on the upper Ohio, 1777-1778: Draper Series Vol. 3. (Oshkosh, Wisconsin: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, March 1912), Page 303-304.

    Volunteer company of 52 officers and privates in Pittsburgh, under General Hand, for three months from May 1, 1778: David Duncan, Captain and Samuel Semple, private.

  30.   Mitchener, Charles Hollowell. Ohio annals: historic events in the Tuscarawas and Muskingum Valleys, and in other portions of the state of Ohio; adventures of Post, Heckewelder and Zeisberger, legends and tradition of the Kophs, mound builders, red and white men; adventures of Putnam and Heckewelder, founders of the state; local history, growth of Ohio in population, political power, wealth and intelligence. (Strasburg, Ohio: Gordon Print., 1975).
  31.   The History of Tuscarawas County, Ohio: containing a history of the county; its townships, towns, churches, schools, etc.; general and local statistics; military record; portraits of early settlers and prominent men; history of the Northwest Territory; history of Ohio; miscellaneous matters, etc. etc. (Chicago [Illinois]: Warner, Beers & Co., 1884).
  32.   Craig, Neville B. The History of Pittsburgh: With a Brief Notice of Its Facilities Of Communication And Other Advantages For Commercial And Manufacturing Purposes. (Pittsburgh: J. R. Weldin Company, 1917), Page 238.
  33. George Washington's Diary Entry: 17 October 1770 , in National Historical Publications & Records Commission. Founders Online: Correspondence and Other Writings of Six Major Shapers of the United States.
  34. Robertson, James Rood. Petitions of the early inhabitants of Kentucky to the General Assembly of Virginia: 1769-1792. (Louisville, Ky.: J.P. Morton & Co., printers to the Filson Club, 1914).

    Petition No. 52 for Division of Fayette County, signed by Benjamin Samples, David Samples, John Samples, Samuel Samples, and Samuel Samples, Jr.

  35. David Sample (Person Page - 934), in Burval, Joe; Burval, Clarice. Burval Genealogy: Web Version of Our Family Genealogy.

    The first record in which David Sample was found is as the signer of a petition: "Petition No. 52 for Division of Fayette County, 17 Sep 17, 1788, signed by Benjamin Samples, David Samples, John Samples, Samuel Samples, and Samuel Samples, Jr." Source: Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky to the General Assembly of Virginia, 1769-1792, by James Rood Robertson, John P. Marton and Company, Louisville, Kentucky (1914), reprinted 1981, Southern Historical Press. Note: It seems likely that Benjamin, David, John and Samuel, Sr., were brothers, or possible one was the father.

  36. Howard I. Bowers. Light Townsend of Kentucky (Unpublished). (FTW: Bowers, Howard I., 07 Sept 2005).

    The first record in which David Sample was found is as the signer of a petition: "Petition No. 52 for Division of Fayette County, 17 Sep 17, 1788, signed by Benjamin Samples, David Samples, John Samples, Samuel Samples, and Samuel Samples, Jr." Source: Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky to the General Assembly of Virginia, 1769-1792, by James Rood Robertson, John P. Marton and Company, Louisville, Kentucky (1914), reprinted 1981, Southern Historical Press. Note: It seems likely that Benjamin, David, John and Samuel, Sr., were brothers, or possible one was the father.

  37. Payne v. Craft.

    [Excerpts] of Record by S14