Person:Anna Roosevelt (4)

     
Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
m. 1 Dec 1883
  1. Anna Eleanor Roosevelt1884 - 1962
  2. Hall Roosevelt1891 - 1941
m. 1905
  1. Anna Eleanor Roosevelt1906 - 1975
  2. James Roosevelt1907 - 1991
  3. Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr1909 - 1909
  4. Elliott Roosevelt1910 - 1990
  5. Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr.1914 - 1988
  6. John Aspinwall Roosevelt1916 - 1981
Facts and Events
Name Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
Gender Female
Birth[1] 11 Oct 1884 New York City, New York, United States
Marriage 1905 to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Death[1] 7 Nov 1962 New York City, New York, United States

Public Life

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States, holding the post from 1933 to 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt's four terms in office. President Harry S. Truman later called her the "First Lady of the World" in tribute to her human rights achievements.

A member of the Roosevelt and Livingston families, Eleanor had an unhappy childhood, suffering the deaths of both parents and one of her brothers at a young age. At 15, she attended Allenwood Academy in London, and was deeply influenced by feminist headmistress Marie Souvestre. Returning to the US, she married her fifth cousin, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, in 1905. The Roosevelts' marriage was complicated from the beginning by Franklin's controlling mother, Sara and after discovering Franklin's affair with Lucy Mercer in 1918, Eleanor resolved to seek fulfillment in a public life of her own. She persuaded Franklin to stay in politics following his partial paralysis from polio, and began to give speeches and campaign in his place. After Franklin's election as Governor of New York, Eleanor regularly made public appearances on his behalf. She had also shaped the role of First Lady during her tenure and beyond.

Though widely respected in her later years, Roosevelt was a controversial First Lady for her outspokenness, particularly her stands on racial issues. She was the first presidential spouse to hold press conferences, write a syndicated newspaper column, and speak at a national convention. On a few occasions, she publicly disagreed with her husband's policies. She launched an experimental community at Arthurdale, West Virginia, for the families of unemployed miners, later widely regarded as a failure. She advocated for expanded roles for women in the workplace, the civil rights of African Americans and Asian Americans, and the rights of World War II refugees.

Following her husband's death, Eleanor remained active in politics for the rest of her life. She pressed the US to join and support the United Nations and became one of its first delegates. She served as the first chair of the UN Commission on Human Rights, and oversaw the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Later she chaired the John F. Kennedy administration's Presidential Commission on the Status of Women. By her death, she was regarded as "one of the most esteemed women in the world" and "the object of almost universal respect". In 1999, she was ranked in the top ten of Gallup's List of Most Widely Admired People of the 20th Century.

Family Life

Eleanor's parents died when she was a child, and she was raised by her maternal grandmother Mary Ludlow Hall. After finishing school in England, she returned to New York and worked as a social worker on New York's East Side.

She met future President Franklin Roosevelt, her father's fifth cousin (through common ancestors Nicholas and Heyeltje Roosevelt), in 1902 when she was 17 and he was a 20-year-old Harvard student. They courted despite his mother's resentment, and were married in 1905. They lived in New York City until Franklin was elected to the state senate in 1911, and they then moved to Albany. They had six children between 1906 and 1916.

References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Eleanor Roosevelt, in National First Ladies Library, [1].


First Ladies of the United States
Martha Dandridge Washington · Abigail Smith Adams · Martha Jefferson Randolph · Dolley Payne Madison · Elizabeth Kortright Monroe · Louisa Johnson Adams · Emily Donelson · Sarah Yorke Jackson · Angelica Singleton Van Buren · Anna Symes Harrison · Jane Irwin Harrison · Letitia Christian Tyler · Priscilla Cooper Tyler · Julia Gardiner Tyler · Sarah Childress Polk · Margaret Smith Taylor · Abigail Powers Fillmore · Jane Appleton Pierce · Harriet Lane Johnston · Mary Todd Lincoln · Eliza McCardle Johnson · Julia Dent Grant · Lucy Webb Hayes · Lucretia Randolph Garfield · Mary Arthur McElroy · Rose Cleveland · Frances Folsom Cleveland · Caroline Scott Harrison · Mary Harrison McKee · Frances Folsom Cleveland · Ida Saxton McKinley · Edith Carow Roosevelt · Helen Herron Taft · Ellen Axson Wilson · Edith Bolling Galt Wilson · Florence Kling Harding · Grace Goodhue Coolidge · Lou Henry Hoover · Eleanor Roosevelt · Bess Wallace Truman · Mamie Doud Eisenhower · Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy · Lady Bird Taylor Johnson · Pat Ryan Nixon · Betty Bloomer Warren Ford · Rosalynn Smith Carter · Nancy Davis Reagan · Barbara Pierce Bush · Hillary Rodham Clinton · Laura Welch Bush · Michelle Robinson Obama


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Eleanor_Roosevelt. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.