Person:John Riley (37)

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John Riley, of Botetourt County, VA
b.abt. 1741
 
  • F.  Riley (add)
m. bef. 1739
  1. Daniel Riley, of Washington County, VAAbt 1739 - 1837
  2. John Riley, of Botetourt County, VAAbt 1741 -
  3. Nathaniel Riley, of Washington County, VAAbt 1745 -
  4. Patrick RileyEst 1748 - Bef 1824
  • HJohn Riley, of Botetourt County, VAAbt 1741 -
  • W.  Elizabeth (add)
m. bef. 1771
Facts and Events
Name John Riley, of Botetourt County, VA
Gender Male
Birth? abt. 1741
Marriage bef. 1771 to Elizabeth (add)

John Riley was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

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Early Land Acquisition in Augusta County, VA

  • 1,004 acre tract patented to John Riley on September 16, 1765 on a branch of Catawba Creek formerly in Augusta County. [Source: The Family of Daniel Riley of Washington County, Virginia, by Michael A. Ports]

Disposition of Land from Botetourt County, VA Records::

  • August 14, 1771. David Lyttle, from Thomas Stockton and Mary—-210 acres on both sides of Catawba; William Preston, from John Riley and Elizabeth - 195 acres on a branch of Catawba. Sold to Robert Caldwell, October 26, 1779.
References
  1.   The Family of Daniel Riley of Washington County, Virginia, by Michael A. Ports.

    One of the first lands surveyed on the waters of the Holston and Clinch Rivers is the 120 acre tract on Sinking Creek a branch of the Holston River for John Riley on February 13, 1774. This may have been the same John and Elizabeth Riley of Botetourt County, who sold to William Preston for 15 pounds Virginia money a 195 acre part of the 1004 acre tract patented to John Riley on September 16, 1765 on a branch of Catawba Creek formerly in Augusta County. John Riley served as a private under Captain Evan Shelby on the expedition against the Indians, which culminated on October 10, 1774 in the Battle of Point Pleasant, the only battle in Dunmore's War. Captain Shelby's Company of Fincastle County Militia had been raised along the waters of the Holston River. That strategic victory over the Indians opened Kentucky and Tennessee for settlement and provided a buffer to the Clinch settlements. However, Indian depravations continued well into the mid 1790's. In early 1775, a Committee of Safety was formed to govern Fincastle County, with William Russell in attendance. In response to provocations from the English crown, the Committee of Safety issued the Fincastle Resolutions. That now famous statement of opposition to the royal government of George III demonstrated that the leaders on the frontier were willing to fight for their freedom. Undoubtedly, many of the settlers agreed.

    2. John Riley moved further down the Holston River and took up 200 acres of land in what was then Washington County, Tennessee on March 30, 1778. On November 10, 1784, the State of North Carolina granted to John Riley 200 acres of land on Indian Creek, including the plantation formerly occupied by William Ashurt. John Riley purchased a second grant from the State of North Carolina for 200 acres of land on both sides of Indian Creek, a branch of the Holston River, on July 29, 1793. In 1784, John paid 10 pounds per 100 acres for his grant. Nine years later, he paid only 50 shillings per 100 acres. On December 10, 1794, John Riley sold one of his 200 acre tracts located on the waters of the Holston River on both sides of Indian Creek for 50 pounds to John Hughes. Then, on March 4, 1800, John Riley sold his remaining tract of 200 acres located on the south side of the Holston River on waters of Indian Creek to Andrew Riley for $1000. There were at least two men named Andrew Riley. One was the son of Daniel and one was the son of John. As a result of a suit against John Riley, the Sullivan County Sheriff Frances Gaines sold at public auction a 200 acre tract on Indian Creek with improvements to John Fagan for $21. For such a small price, the sheriff's sale must surely not have included the 200 acre tract. In any event, Andrew sold a 200 acre tract on Indian Creek for $540 to William Scott on February 19, 1807. Andrew Riley and James B. Riley, sons and heirs of John Riley deceased, sold to John Rhea on June 13, 1821 on behalf of their sisters and other heirs the 209 acre tract in Carter County (formerly Sullivan County) on the south side of the Holston River on southeast branch of Indian Creek for $200. The tract contained 209 acres "pursuant to a patent grant issued to John Rhea by the State of North Carolina one undivided 1/3 part conveyed to John Riley now deceased."
    Soon after the Revolutionary War, on June 24, 1783, another John Riley received from the State of Virginia Bounty Land Warrant No. 1101 for 200 acres as partial payment for his military service. The land was located in Kentucky. Whether or not this John Riley may have been related is not known. At least several men named John Riley served Virginia during the Revolution. One of them served in Captain Robert Vance's Company in the 13th Virginia Regiment. Five of the companies in the regiment served with Muhlenberg's brigade in the northern campaigns, while the remaining five were stationed at Fort Pitt and Fort Randolph at Point Pleasant. According to an affidavit filed by Captain Robert Vance, this John Riley had died by 1806. More research is needed to properly identify and separate all of the men named John Riley.