Place:Utrecht, Netherlands

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NameUtrecht
Alt namesUtrecht provincesource: Getty Vocabulary Program
UTsource: Abbreviation
Provincie Utrecht
TypeProvincie
Coordinates52.083°N 5.133°E
Located inNetherlands
Contained Places
Unknown
Nederlangbroek
Neerlangbroek
Tricht
Area
Wiltsburg
Buurtschap
Achthoven ( 1818 - 1857 )
Cemetery
Begraafplaats Tolsteeg Utrecht ( 1931 - )
Gemeente
Baarn
Bunnik
Bunschoten
De Bilt
De Ronde Venen ( 1989 - )
Eemnes
Houten
IJsselstein
Leusden
Lopik
Montfoort
Oudewater ( 1970 - )
Renswoude
Rhenen
Schoonhoven ( - 1814 )
Soest ( 1000 - )
Stichtse Vecht ( 2011 - )
Veenendaal
Vianen ( 2002 - )
Wijk bij Duurstede
Willige Langerak ( 1818 - 1943 )
Woerden ( 1989 - )
Woudenberg
Zeist
Inhabited place
Austerlitz
Bilthoven
Molenvliet
Nieuwegein
Nieuwersluis
Oud-Zuilen
Randenbroek
Spakenburg
Uithoorn
Utrecht
Municipality
Soesterberg
Stad
Amersfoort ( 1000 - )
Unknown
Achterveld
Baambrugge
Blauwkapel
Botshol
Breudijk
Breukelerveen
Cattenbroek
De Haar
De Meije
Demmerik
Dijkveld-en-Rateles
Dwarsdijk
Emmeklaar
Galekop
Geerestein
Gieltjesdorp
Hamersveld
Hardenbroek
Heemstede
Heikoop
Honswijk
Houtdijken
IJsselvere
Isselt
Kortrijk
Kromwijk
Lage-Haar
Loenen aan de Vecht
Lopikerkapel
Maarschalkerwaard
Mastwijk
Mijnden
Nieuw-Maarsseveen
Nieuwer-Ter Aa
Oostveensche-Landen
Oud- en Nieuw-Maarsseveen
Oud-Over
Papendorp
Reenseveen
Reijerscop
Schagen
Soestbergen
Themaat
Utrechtse Heuvelrug
Vechten
Vijfhoeven
Vleuten-De Meern
Vlooswijk
Waijen
Waveren
Westveen
Zevenhoven
Zevenhuizen
Voormalige gemeente
's-Gravesloot ( 1818 - 1857 )
Abcoude ( 1941 - 2010 )
Abcoude-Baambrugge ( 1818 - 1941 )
Abcoude-Proostdij ( 1818 - 1941 )
Achttienhoven ( 1818 - 1954 )
Amerongen ( - 2006 )
Benschop ( - 1988 )
Breukelen ( 1949 - 2010 )
Breukelen-Nijenrode ( 1818 - 1949 )
Breukelen-Sint Pieters ( 1818 - 1949 )
Cabauw ( 1818 - 1857 )
Cothen ( - 1996 )
Darthuizen ( 1818 - 1857 )
De Vuursche ( 1818 - 1857 )
Doorn ( - 2006 )
Driebergen ( - 1931 )
Driebergen-Rijsenburg ( 1931 - 2006 )
Duist ( 1818 - 1857 )
Everdingen ( 2002 - )
Gerverskop ( 1818 - 1857 )
Haarzuilens ( 1818 - 1954 )
Harmelen ( - 2001 )
Hoenkoop ( 1818 - 1970 )
Hoogland ( - 1974 )
Indijk ( 1817 - 1821 )
Jaarsveld ( - 1943 )
Jutphaas ( - 1971 )
Kamerik ( 1857 - 1989 )
Kockengen ( - 1989 )
Laagnieuwkoop
Langbroek ( - 1996 )
Leersum ( - 2006 )
Linschoten ( - 1989 )
Loenen ( - 2011 )
Loenersloot ( 1818 - 1964 )
Loosdrecht ( 1819 - 2002 )
Maarn ( 1818 - 2006 )
Maarssen ( - 2011 )
Maarssenbroek ( 1818 - 1857 )
Maarsseveen ( 1818 - 1949 )
Maartensdijk ( - 2001 )
Mijdrecht ( - 1989 )
Nigtevecht ( 1818 - 1989 )
Odijk ( 1818 - 1964 )
Oud-Wulven ( 1818 - 1857 )
Oudenrijn ( 1818 - 1954 )
Oudhuizen ( 1818 - 1857 )
Polsbroek ( 1857 - 1988 )
Portengen ( 1818 - 1857 )
Rhijnauwen ( 1818 - 1857 )
Rijsenburg ( 1818 - 1931 )
Ruwiel ( 1818 - 1964 )
Schalkwijk ( - 1962 )
Schonauwen ( 1818 - 1857 )
Snelrewaard ( 1817 - 1989 )
Sterkenburg ( 1818 - 1857 )
Stoutenburg ( 1818 - 1969 )
Teckop ( 1817 - 1857 )
Tienhoven ( - 1957 )
Tull en 't Waal ( 1818 - 1962 )
Veldhuizen ( 1818 - 1954 )
Vinkeveen en Waverveen ( 1841 - 1989 )
Vinkeveen ( - 1841 )
Vleuten ( - 1954 )
Vreeland ( - 1964 )
Vreeswijk ( - 1971 )
Waverveen ( - 1841 )
Werkhoven ( - 1964 )
Westbroek ( - 1957 )
Willeskop ( 1818 - 1989 )
Wilnis ( - 1989 )
Wulverhorst ( 1818 - 1857 )
Zegveld ( - 1989 )
Zevender ( 1818 - 1857 )
Zuid-Polsbroek ( 1817 - 1857 )
Zuilen ( - 1953 )
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Utrecht is a province of the Netherlands. It is located in the centre of the country, bordering the Eemmeer in the north, the province of Gelderland in the east, the river Rhine in the south, the province of South Holland in the west and the province of North Holland in the north-west. With an area of approximately , it is the smallest of the twelve provinces. Apart from its eponymous capital, major cities in the province are Amersfoort, Houten, Nieuwegein, Veenendaal and Zeist.

In the International Organization for Standardization world region code system Utrecht makes up one region with code -UT.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

The Bishopric of Utrecht was established in 695 when Saint Willibrord was consecrated bishop of the Frisians at Rome by Pope Sergius I. With the consent of the Frankish ruler, Pippin of Herstal, he settled in an old Roman fort in Utrecht. After Willibrord's death the diocese suffered greatly from the incursions of the Vikings. Better times appeared during the reign of the Saxon emperors, who frequently summoned the Bishops of Utrecht to attend the imperial councils and diets. In 1024 the bishops were made Princes of the Holy Roman Empire and the new Prince-Bishopric of Utrecht was formed. In 1122, with the Concordat of Worms, the Emperor's right of investiture was annulled, and the cathedral chapter received the right to elect the bishop. It was, however, soon obligated to share this right with the four other collegiate chapters in the city. The Counts of Holland and Guelders, between whose territories the lands of the Bishops of Utrecht lay, also sought to acquire influence over the filling of the episcopal see. This often led to disputes and consequently the Holy See frequently interfered in the election. After the middle of the 14th century the popes repeatedly appointed the bishop directly without regard to the five chapters.

In 1527, the Bishop sold his territories, and thus his secular authority, to Holy Roman Emperor Charles V and the principality became an integral part of the Habsburg dominions, which already included most other Dutch provinces. The chapters transferred their right of electing the bishop to Charles V and his government, a measure to which Pope Clement VII gave his consent, under political pressure after the Sacco di Roma. However, the Habsburg rule did not last long, as Utrecht joined in the Dutch Revolt against Charles' successor Philip II in 1579, becoming a part of the Dutch Republic.

In World War II, Utrecht was held by German forces until the general capitulation of the Germans in the Netherlands on May 5, 1945. It was occupied by Canadian Allied forces on May 7, 1945. The towns of Oudewater, Woerden and Vianen were transferred from the province of South Holland to Utrecht in 1970, 1989 and 2002 respectively. In February 2011, Utrecht, together with the provinces of North Holland and Flevoland, showed a desire to investigate the feasibility of a merger between the three provinces. This has been positively received by the Dutch cabinet, for the desire to create one Randstad province has already been mentioned in the coalition agreement. The province of South Holland, part of the Randstad urban area, visioned to be part of the Randstad province, and very much supportive of the idea of a merger into one province, is not named. With or without South Holland, if created, the new province would be the largest in the Netherlands in both area and population.

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Utrecht (province). The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
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