Place:Fauquier, Virginia, United States

NameFauquier
Alt namesFauquiersource: Getty Vocabulary Program
TypeCounty
Coordinates38.733°N 77.817°W
Located inVirginia, United States     (1759 - )
See alsoPrince William, Virginia, United StatesParent county
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Fauquier is a county located in the United States Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 65,203. The county seat is Warrenton. In 2011, Fauquier County was number eight on the U.S. Census Bureau list of highest-income counties in the United States.[1]

Fauquier County is part of the Washington Metropolitan Area.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

In 1608, the first European to explore in the vicinity, Captain John Smith, reported that the Whonkentia (a subgroup of the Siouan-speaking Manahoac tribe) inhabited the area. The Manahoac were forced out around 1670 by the Iroquois (Seneca), who did not resettle the area. The Conoy camped briefly near The Plains, from 1697 to 1699. The Six Nations ceded the entire region including modern Fauquier to Virginia Colony at the Treaty of Albany, in 1722.

Fauquier County was established on May 1, 1759, from Prince William County. It is named for Francis Fauquier, Lieutenant Governor of Virginia at the time, who won the land in a poker game, according to legend.

American Civil War battles in Fauquier County included (in order) the First Battle of Rappahannock Station, the Battle of Thoroughfare Gap, the Battle of Kelly's Ford, the Battle of Aldie, the Battle of Middleburg, the Battle of Upperville, the First and Second Battle of Auburn, the Battle of Buckland Mills, and the Second Battle of Rappahannock Station.

Fauquier County celebrated its 250th anniversary in 2009 with year-long events. The festivities were kicked off with the African-American Historical Association celebrating Black History Month in February. The grand events took place on May 1 when Main Street was filled with guests and residents who enjoyed entertainment by historians, demonstrations, performances, contests, activities, lectures, Kid’s Corner, and live music. Birthday cakes were assembled and shared with the Fauquier Food Distribution Coalition. There were historical site visits including some of the confederate battlefields. Many of the local churches participated in this event with homecoming celebrations. Festivities were concluded with the First Night Warrenton on December 31. This family-oriented event included musical performances, puppet shows and a magician.

Timeline

Date Event Source
1759 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1759 Court records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1759 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1759 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1759 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1790 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1790 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1853 Birth records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1790 17,892
1800 21,329
1810 22,689
1820 23,103
1830 26,086
1840 21,897
1850 20,868
1860 21,706
1870 19,690
1880 22,993
1890 22,590
1900 23,374
1910 22,526
1920 21,869
1930 21,071
1940 21,039
1950 21,248
1960 24,066
1970 26,375
1980 35,889
1990 48,741

Research Tips

Online Records

http://www.lva.virginia.gov/whatwehave/land/index.htm

Statutes at Large, Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia from the First Session of the Legislature in the Year 1619 by W. W. Hening - online!

Abstracts of wills, administrations, and marriages of Fauquier County, Virginia, 1759-1800
at http://www.archive.org/details/essaisdelittrat00guizgoog

Fauquier County Books

If you know any of these are available online, please add the link.

Fauquier County, Virginia Deeds 1759 - 1778 compiled by John K. Gott

Abstracts of Fauquier County, Virginia Wills, Inventories and Accounts 1759-1800 by John K. Gott

Abstracts of Fauquier County, Virginia Wills, Inventories & Accounts 1800-1865 Dee Ann Buck

Fauquier County, Virginia 1759-1854 Marriages by John K. Gott

Fauquier County Virginia Court Records John K Gott

Fauquier County, Virginia Deeds 1778-1785 Compiled by John K. Gott

Abstracts of Virginia's Northern Neck Warrants & Surveys Dunmore, Shenandoah, Culpeper, Prince William, Fauquier & Stafford Counties 1710 - 1780 Volume III compiled by Peggy Shomo Joyner.

Military Records, Certificates of Service, Discharge, Heirs, & Pension Declarations and Schedules From The Fauquier County, Virginia Court Minute Books 1784 - 1840 compiled by Joan W. PETERS.

Fauquier County, Virginia Clerks Loose Papers - A Guide to the Records 1759 - 1919 by Joan W. Peters. C.G.R. S.

Fauquier County, Virginia Guardian Bonds 1759-1871 by Dee Ann Buck

Fauquier County, Virginia Guardian Bonds 1759-1871 by John K. Gott, Heritage Books.


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