Person:William Beverley (2)

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Col. William Beverley, of "Beverley Manor", Augusta County, VA
b.abt. 1698 Virginia
d.28 Feb 1756
m. abt. 1698
  1. Col. William Beverley, of "Beverley Manor", Augusta County, VAabt 1698 - 1756
  • HCol. William Beverley, of "Beverley Manor", Augusta County, VAabt 1698 - 1756
  • WElizabeth Bland1705 -
m. est. 1723-1725
  1. Anna Beverleyest 1724-1740 -
  2. Ursula Beverleybef 1725 -
  3. Elizabeth Beverley1725/26 - 1795
  4. John Beverleyest 1727-1743 - 1743
  5. Robert Beverley1740 - 1800
Facts and Events
Name Col. William Beverley, of "Beverley Manor", Augusta County, VA
Alt Name Col. William Beverley, of "Blandfield", Essex County, VA
Gender Male
Birth? abt. 1698 Virginia
Marriage est. 1723-1725 prob. Essex County, Virginiato Elizabeth Bland
Death? 28 Feb 1756

William Beverley was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

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Early Land Acquisition in Augusta County, VA

Image:BeverleyWilliam2050acres.jpg

William Beverley's land (Beverley Manor NE, 2,050 acres, 1748) as shown on the map meticulously drawn by J.R. Hildebrand, cartographer. This map is copyrighted©, used by permission of John Hildebrand, son of J.R. Hildebrand, April, 2009.

Biography of Col. William Beverley

William Beverley of "Blandfield," Essex County was the son of the historian, Robert Beverley of "Beverley Park," King and Queen county and was born about 1698. He was clerk of Essex county from 1716 to 1745, Burgess from Orange county in 1736 and from Essex in 1741, 1744, 1748, 1751 and doubtless in intervening years. Having large landed interests in the western part of the colony, he was appointed county lieutenant of Orange and Augusta counties and, in 1751, was made a member of the council. Col. Beverley was one of the commissioners from Virginia to meet those from other colonies and treat with the six nations at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in 1744. Beverley was also appointed by Lord Fairfax, one of the commissioners to settle in his behalf, the boundary of Northern Neck. He inherited large estates, including "Beverley Park," containing 7,600 acres, with "The Plains," of 1,200 acres adjoining, and "Blandfield" on the Rappahannock, in Essex, where he built the brick mansion which is one of the finest remaining examples of colonial architecture. He also became the possessor of immense tracts of land by patent. Besides several smaller grants of some thousand acres each, he obtained, Sept. 6, 1736, a grant of 118,420 acres lying around the present Staunton in Augusta county. This land, which he named "Beverley Manor," now the name of a magisterial district in Augusta, he patented in partnership with several persons, but on the day after the grant was made, they conveyed their interests to him. This estate he sold to settlers in smaller tracts. His death occurred about March 1, 1756.

(Source: Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume I, III--Colonial Councillors of State)

Map of "Beverley Manor" in Augusta County

Image:BeverleyFullMap.GIF


Will of William Beverley

  • In the name of God, Amen. I, William Beverley of Blandfield in the parish of St. Ann in the county of Essex, Virginia, Esquire, being in tolerable health and of sound mind & memory do make this my last will and testament in manner and form following:
Imprimis. I do order my executors herein after named to pay all my just debts that I owe to my several creditors.
Item. I do lend unto my dear and loving wife Elizabeth during her natural life and in full consideration of her thirds dower or child’s part of all my estate real and personal and in lieu thereof all my lands and plantations in the county of Essex together with all my slaves, cattle, horses, hogs, and sheep usually kept thereon, and I also give her on the said consideration all my household goods, carts, and tools with corn belonging to the said plantation, also my household goods and plate which I now have in England, also my chair and coach if Mr. Edward Athawes has bought one for me at the time of my death as I have directed him, all this in full consideration as aforesaid.
Item. Whereas I have already given unto my son-in-law James Mills in money & slaves to the value of one thousand pounds sterling, I do therefore give and bequeath unto my dear daughter Elizabeth, now the wife of the said James Mills, and her heirs forever the further sum of five hundred pounds sterling.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my dear daughter Ursula, now the wife of William Fitzhugh, and her heirs forever the sum of five hundred pounds sterling, having also paid her said husband the sum of one thousand pounds sterling, memorandum that these legacies are in full of my said two daughters’ marriage portions.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my dear daughter Anna Beverley ( ) to be paid her on the day of her marriage or when she comes to the age of twenty-one years, whichever shall first happen, and in the meantime I order that she be maintained out of her brother’s estate.
Item. I do give and bequeath unto my dear son Robert and to his heirs forever, all the rest of my estate both real and personal and the fee simple of the estate above devised to his dear mother, but if she shall happen to depart this life before he shall attain to the age of twenty-one years (which God forbid), then and in such case I give and bequeath unto my daughter Elizabeth Mills and the heirs of her body lawfully begotten forever all my lands in the counties of King & Queen and Essex, and my lands called Pewmazeno situated lying and being on both sides of the mill pond of the mill commonly called Taliaferro’s Mill in the county of Caroline and now belonging to Thomas Roy and Adam Lindsey, together with one-third of all the Negroes left my wife and son, and all these lands and Negroes are to go to and descend together in manner to my dear daughter Elizabeth as aforesaid, but on expressed condition that she and her heirs shall convey unto my dear daughter Anna all their right and title of in and to my tract of land of four thousand acres called Elkwood, situated in the county of Culpepper which was settled by act of assembly in the year of our Lord seventeen hundred and twenty-two and in the same manner as therein in this my will, shall give it to her, & if my said daughter Mills and her heirs shall refuse to convey it to her as aforesaid then and in such case all the said tracts of land, herein bequeathed to my dear daughter Mills to go to my dear daughter Anna & to descend in the same manner as the other lands will in this my will, be given to her as appointed to go and descend and not otherwise, and then my said dear daughter Mills to have all these lands. I shall give and bequeath to my dear daughter Anna on the same terms as I give and bequeathed in King & Queen, Essex, and Caroline to her. And in case of failure of issue of the body of my said dear daughter Mills lawfully begotten, I give and bequeath all the said lands and slaves to my dear daughter Ursula Fitzhugh and the heirs of her body lawfully begotten forever, and on failure of such issue I give and bequeath all the said lands and slaves to my dear daughter Anna and the heirs of her body lawfully begotten forever.
Item. In case of the death of the death of my dear son Robert as foresaid I give and bequeath unto my dear daughter Ursula Fitzhugh and the heirs of her body lawfully begotten forever one-third of all the Negroes left my wife and son and all my lands in the county of Caroline containing about fourteen thousand one hundred and seventy-four acres commonly called Beverley Chance, be the same more or less and my lots in Port Royal and, on failure of such issue, I give the said lands and slaves unto my dear daughter Elizabeth Mills and to the heirs of her body lawfully begotten forever.
Item. In case of the death of the death of my dear son Robert Beverley as foresaid, I give and bequeath unto my dear daughter Anna Beverley and to the heirs of her body lawfully begotten forever one-third part of all my slaves and all my lands in the counties of Culpepper and Prince William and my lots in Falmouth & Fredericksburg and, on failure of such issue, I give the said lands, lots, and slaves to my dear daughter Elizabeth Mills & the heirs of her body lawfully begotten forever and, on failure of such issue, I give the said slaves, lands, and lots to my dear daughter Ursula Fitzhugh and to the heirs of her body lawfully begotten forever.
Be it remembered that it is my intention that in all these bequests of slaves to my dear daughter, the increase of them to go, and descend in the several entails as if they had been expressly named.
Item. I desire my executors will buy for each of themselves a pair of good horses fit for coach or chair and charge my estate with their cost.
Item. I desire my executors will send to London for a neat marble tombstone and have it placed over his (Robert Beverley, his father) body at the charge of my estate, he having departed this life at Beverley Park the 21st of April 1722, new style and lies buried there.
Item. It is my desire that my body may be interred as privately as may be without any pomp or funeral sermon.
Item. I do nominate and appoint my well beloved wife and my cousin * friend John Robinson, Esq., of King & Queen, executors of this my last will and testament and guardian of my dear son Robert and my dear daughter Anna. And it is my will and desire that my son may remain under the care of Mr. Edward Athawes of London, merchant, till he thinks proper to send him unto this country. And it is also my intent that my wife is not to make up the loss or decrease of the horses, cattle, sheep, or hogs or other personal estate. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this third day of December in the year one thousand seven hundred and fifty-five, being all written with my own hand and the several obligations also made by myself.
W. Beverley (L. S.)
Item. My will and desire is and I do empower either of my executors to sell all my lands in Augusta and Isle of Wight and add the proceeds to my personal estate.
Item. If money should be wanted for the payment of my debts and legacies before my crops & rents and other profits of my estate can raise money sufficient for the payment of them, I do hereby empower my executors to borrow enough money for the payment thereof at interest. In testimony whereof I have to this my last will and testament set my hand and seal the day and year first above written.
W. Beverley (L. S.)
Sealed & declared to be the last will and testament of the within named William Beverley by him in the presence of us: Archibald Ritchie, Ch. Mortimer, John Corrie, James Emerson
At a general court held at the capitol the 3rd day of May 1756. This will was proved according to law by the oaths of John Corrie and James Emerson, witnesses thereto & ordered to be recorded. And, on the motion of John Robinson, Esq., one of the executors therein named who made oath according to law, certificate was granted him for obtaining a probate thereof in due form, giving security whereupon he together with Ralph Wormeley and Bernard Moore, Gent., his securities entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of ten thousand pounds current money conditioned as the law directs, liberty nevertheless being reserved to Elizabeth Beverley, the executrix named in the said will to join in the probate thereof when she shall think fit.
Teste: Ben Waller, C. Cur.


Records in Orange County, VA

Petition of Robert Green that having land on the side of Muddy Run in the great fork of Rappahannock River, he desires to build a mill on the run. The opposite land being the estate of Coll. Wm. Beverley, he cannot have one acre contiquous although he offered to purchase it at any reasonable price. Prays for order that one acre may be laid out for the use of the mill. [Orange County, Virginia Judgements 1735, Dorman, pg. 75].