Person:Thomas Jefferson (8)

     
President Thomas Jefferson
m. 03 Oct 1739
  1. Jane Jefferson1740 -
  2. Mary Jefferson1741 -
  3. President Thomas Jefferson1743 - 1826
  4. Elizabeth Jefferson1744 -
  5. Martha Jefferson1746 - 1811
  6. Peter Field Jefferson1748 -
  7. Son Jefferson1750 -
  8. Lucy Jefferson1752 - 1810
  9. Ann Scott Jefferson1755 - 1828
  10. Randolph Jefferson1755 - 1815
  • HPresident Thomas Jefferson1743 - 1826
  • WMartha Wayles1748 - 1782
m. 01 Jan 1772
  1. Martha Jefferson1772 - 1836
  2. Jane Randolph Jefferson1774 - 1775
  3. Peter Jefferson1777 - 1777
  4. Mary Jefferson1778 - 1804
  5. Lucy Elizabeth Jefferson1780 - 1781
  6. Lucy Elizabeth Jefferson1782 - 1785
  • HPresident Thomas Jefferson1743 - 1826
  • WSally Hemings1773 - 1835
m. bef. 1795
  1. Harriet Hemings1795 -
  2. Beverly Hemings1798 -
  3. Daughter Hemings1799 -
  4. Harriet Hemings1801 - aft 1863
  5. Madison Hemings1805 - 1877
  6. Eston Hemings1808 - 1856
Facts and Events
Name President Thomas Jefferson
Gender Male
Birth[1] 2 Apr 1743 Shadwell, Albemarle, Virginia
Marriage 01 Jan 1772 Virginia, USA
to Martha Wayles
Marriage bef. 1795 Not married
to Sally Hemings
Death[1] 4 Jul 1826 Charlottesville, Albemarle, Virginia, United States
Burial? Charlottesville, Albemarle, Virginia, United StatesMonticello


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Thomas Jefferson (April 13 [O.S. April 2] 1743 – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father, the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and the third President of the United States (1801–1809). He was a spokesman for democracy, and embraced the principles of republicanism and the rights of the individual with worldwide influence. At the beginning of the American Revolution, he served in the Continental Congress, representing Virginia, and then served as a wartime Governor of Virginia (1779–1781). In May 1785, he became the United States Minister to France and later the first United States Secretary of State (1790–1793) serving under President George Washington. In opposition to Alexander Hamilton's Federalism, Jefferson and his close friend, James Madison, organized the Democratic-Republican Party, and later resigned from Washington's cabinet. Elected Vice President in 1796 in the administration of John Adams, Jefferson opposed Adams, and with Madison secretly wrote the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, which attempted to nullify the Alien and Sedition Acts.

Elected president in what Jefferson called the "Revolution of 1800", he oversaw acquisition of the vast Louisiana Territory from France (1803), and sent out the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804–1806), and later three others, to explore the new west. Jefferson doubled the size of the United States during his presidency. His second term was beset with troubles at home, such as the failed treason trial of his former Vice President Aaron Burr. When Britain threatened American shipping challenging U.S. neutrality during its war with Napoleon, he tried economic warfare with his embargo laws, which only impeded American foreign trade. In 1803, President Jefferson initiated a process of Indian tribal removal to the Louisiana Territory west of the Mississippi River, having opened lands for eventual American settlers. In 1807 Jefferson drafted and signed into law a bill that banned slave importation into the United States.

A leader in the Enlightenment, Jefferson was a polymath in the arts, sciences, and politics. Considered an important architect in the classical tradition, he designed his home Monticello and other notable buildings. Jefferson was keenly interested in science, invention, architecture, religion, and philosophy; he was an active member and eventual president of the American Philosophical Society. He was conversant in French, Greek, Italian, Latin, and Spanish, and studied other languages and linguistics, interests which led him to found the University of Virginia after his presidency. Although not a notable orator, Jefferson was a skilled writer and corresponded with many influential people in America and Europe throughout his adult life.

As long as he lived, Jefferson expressed opposition to slavery, yet he owned hundreds of slaves and freed only a few of them. Historians generally believe that after the death of his wife Jefferson had a long-term relationship with his slave, Sally Hemings, and fathered some or all of her children. Although criticized by many present-day scholars over the issues of racism and slavery, Jefferson is consistently rated as one of the greatest U.S. presidents.

Jefferson's Relationship with Sally Hemings

Sarah "Sally" Hemings (Shadwell, Albemarle County, Virginia, circa 1773 – Charlottesville, Virginia, 1835) was a mixed-race slave owned by President Thomas Jefferson through inheritance by his wife. She was the half-sister of Jefferson's wife, Martha Wayles Skelton Jefferson by their father John Wayles. She was notable because most historians now widely believe that the widower Jefferson took her as a concubine, had six children with her. [Source: Wikipedia]

Sally Hemings was not married to Thomas Jefferson, thus her children took her surname. According to the Report of the Research Committee on Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings by the Thomas Jefferson Foundation in January 2000:

The DNA study, combined with multiple strands of currently available documentary and statistical evidence, indicates a high probability that Thomas Jefferson fathered Eston Hemings, and that he most likely was the father of all six of Sally Hemings's children appearing in Jefferson's records. Those children are Harriet, who died in infancy; Beverly; an unnamed daughter who died in infancy; Harriet; Madison; and Eston. [Source: Thomas Jefferson's Monticello Website].

External links

References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Thomas Jefferson, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.
Signers of U.S. Declaration of Independence
John AdamsSamuel AdamsJosiah BartlettCarter BraxtonCharles CarrollSamuel ChaseAbraham ClarkGeorge ClymerWilliam ElleryWilliam FloydBen FranklinElbridge GerryButton GwinnettLyman HallJohn HancockBenjamin HarrisonJohn HartJoseph HewesThomas HeywardWilliam HooperStephen HopkinsFrancis HopkinsonSamuel HuntingtonThomas JeffersonFrancis Lightfoot LeeRichard Henry LeeFrancis LewisLivingstonThomas LynchThomas McKeanArthur MiddletonLewis MorrisRobert MorrisJohn MortonThomas Nelson, Jr.William PacaRobert Treat PaineJohn PennGeorge ReadRodneyRossRushEdward RutledgeRoger ShermanSmithStocktonStoneTaylorThorntonWaltonWilliam WhippleWilliam WilliamsJames WilsonWitherspoonOliver WolcottWythe




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