Person:Joseph Smith (37)

m. ABT 1719
  1. Capt. Abraham SmithABT 1722 - 1782
  2. Col. Daniel SmithABT 1724 - 1781
  3. Henry SmithABT 1727 - BEF 1792
  4. Patrick Smithabt 1728 - abt 1756
  5. Lt. John SmithABT 1730 - 1756
  6. Joseph SmithABT 1734 - 1756
  7. Margaret 'Louisa' Smith1741 - 1823
  8. David Smith1741 -
  9. Jonathan Smith1744 -
  10. unproven Jordan SmithBEF 1753 -
  11. William Smith1753 -
  12. James Smith1753 -
Facts and Events
Name Joseph Smith
Gender Male
Birth[1][2][3] ABT 1734 of, Ulster, Ireland
Alt Birth? 1734 Chester County, Pennsylvania
Death[4][5] 1756 Taken Prisoner at Fort Vause by Shawnee Indians, Died on the Way to Canada
Burial[6]

Joseph Smith was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

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Indian Attacks of 1755-1758 in Augusta County, VA

According to records in Augusta County, Joseph Smith was captured and taken into captivity by Shawnee Indians in the Indian Attacks of 1755-1758 in Augusta County, Virginia. According to other sources, Joseph Smith died on the way to Canada.


Information on Joseph Smith

Ancestral File Number:<AFN> Q65B-QT

Joseph Smith: a. Joseph Smith is listed as in 1740 Importation of John Smith as one of “his own Charges from Ireland to Philadelphia & from thence into this Colony” [Orange County, Virginia.]

b. 1753 will of John Smith: what Ever of my Land Remains un sold to pay of my Debts to be Divided Equally between my sons William Joseph David Jonathan and James Jordan

c. Smith Cousins Four: Joseph, born 1734, in Chester County, Pennsylvania (?), was captured with his father at Ft. Vause, June 25, 1756, and died a prisoner on the way to [Canada]. [Smith Cousins Four compiled by Zula Wood Atwood, Frank L. Eddens, Jr, Mildred Smith Shumaker, & Guy R. Smith.]

d. Note from Guy R.. Smith [Historian for the Col. John Smith Society]: The three sons John lost in the war: Lt. John Smith, Joseph Smith, and most likely a Patrick Smith. The State historical Library in Wisconsin has Preston Papers which summarized from 1754 to end of war the people killed Feb 1756 Chalkely Vol 2-March 1756 Robert Looney was killed (he was a neighbor of the Smith family),.. Patrick Smith was killed. He was probably born in the colonies because he was not listed in the importation papers.

e. Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia Monday April 3d 1758, a Memorial was read - "To the President, Council, and House of Burgesses and referred to Consideration of the House", stating that in June 1756, the said Smith then in Fort Vaufs [sic], in Augusta, was attacked by the enemy, his eldest son killed and he was captured. "He has lost three sons and a great part of his Fortune in the service of his country." [Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia 1752-1755, 1756-1758].

d. Note from Guy R.. Smith [Historian for the Col. John Smith Society]: The three sons John lost in the war: Lt. John Smith, Joseph Smith, and most likely a Patrick Smith. The State historical Library in Wisconsin has Preston Papers which summarized from 1754 to end of war the people killed Feb 1756 Chalkely Vol 2-March 1756 Robert Looney was killed (he was a neighbor of the Smith family),.. Patrick Smith was killed. He was probably born in the colonies because he was not listed in the importation papers.

References
  1. Court records, p. 205, 1740.

    John Smith made oath that he imported himself, Margaret his wife, Abraham, Henry, Daniel, John & Joseph Smith & Robert Mc Dowel, as his own Charges from Ireland to Philadelphia & from thence into this Colony & that this is the first time of his proving his & their rights in order to obtain land.---

    Orange County, Virginia Order Book II, Circuit Court of Orange County, Orange, Virginia, 1740 p. 205


    [Note: There is no proof of any last name for Margaret, John’s wife. Guy Smith has a theory that perhaps Robert McDowel could be a relative of Margaret.]

    Importation of the John Smith family in the Orange County, Virginia Order Book II, Circuit Court of Orange County, Orange, Virginia, 1740 p. 205--document provided by Guy R. Smith--see text and image

  2. Will, p. 205, 1753.

    JOHN SMITH - Will of 1753

    Copied from:
    Settlers by the Long Grey Trail
    A contribution to: The History and Genealogy of Colonial Families of Rockingham County, Virginia
    by J. Houston Harrison C. J. Carrier Company Harrison burg, Virginia 1975
    Page 199:
    "It has been well said that the Harrisons of Rockingham were intimately connected with the Smiths. Reference here is to the family of the immigrant Capt. John Smith, some account of whom has been given, and the accidental finding of whose will among the unindexed records at Staunton has been noted. (See pp. 8, 37, 86, 141). This will, in the original, was written on a single sheet of paper on the back of which occurs the notation: "John Smith Senr. Will," is dated May 7, 1753, and reads as follows-

    "IN THE NAME OF GOD AMEN-
    I John Smith of Augusta County and Colony of Virginia being very Sick in Body but in my perfect Sences do make this my Last will and testament first of all I Leave to Margaret my well beloved wife all my Stock of Horses and Cattle Household Goods and all my Movables Whatsoever She shall also make Choice of any one Tract of Land that I have which She is to hold During her Life and at her Death the sd. Land to fall to my daughter Louisa I also Constitute and appoint Daniel Harrison Silas Hart and my son Abraham Smith to be my Executors and it is my will that they Shall Sell all or so much of my Land Excepting the above Tracts as will Pay all of my Debts and funeral Charges and what Ever of my Land Remains un sold to pay of my Debts to be Divided Equally between my sons William Joseph David Jonathan and James Jordan my Executors to Pay five Shillings Each to my Sons Abraham Henry Daniel and John & I Do hereby Revoke make null and void all other wills made by me before this Date and hereby Pronounce and Publickly Declare this to be my Last Will and Testament in Witness whereof I have Hereunto Set my hand an Seal this Seventh Day of May on Thousand Seven Hundred & Fifty Three- "In Presents of James Patton, Robt. Renick, Humphrey Madison
    "Jno. Smith (seal)
    (See original wills, Box 3, Staunton, Virginia) [Note: John Smith had at least 2 wills. This one dated 1753 and a final one dated April 26, 1779.]

    "The signature of Capt. Smith is in a very bold hand.

    The seal is of red wax bearing embossed on it the figure of a "horn of Plenty," out of which pours a "fleur-de-lis", and water (?), onto a sprig, or branch of a vine, placed underneath, and a curved as an inverted rainbow. The fleur-de-lis was the Royal emblem of France, and is also the same for a species of iris. Probably the vine of the seal alludes to the latter, particularly as the iris of mythology was associated with the rainbow. In one way or another the fleur-de-lis occurs frequently in the arms of Smith families. Its significance pouring from a horn of plenty would seem to be evident. On the Arms of Richard Smith, the Smithtown, Long Island, immigrant, the fleur-de-lis was a prominent figure. (See p. 37)….
    Note from Guy Smith-the seal is reversed in this image.

    "The will is interesting, in that it mentions more children than appear to have heretofore been credited to Capt. Smith. At the proving of his importation at Orange (see p. 8), he included his wife Margaret, and sons Abraham, Henry, Daniel, John, and Joseph. Of these Abraham, b. in Ulster, Ireland, 1722, m. Sarah Caldwell, of Augusta County; Daniel, b. in Ulster, 1724, m. about 1751, Jane, the daughter of Capt. Daniel Harrison; Henry, b. 1727, m. Camey ___ [Amy/Amey/Amelia-various spellings from land records]; John Jr., born 1730, was killed at Ft. Vause, June 25, 1756; and Joseph, born 1734, in Chester County, Pennsylvania (?), was captured with his father at Ft. Vause, June 25, 1756, and died a prisoner on the way to [Canada]. A daughter, Margaret, (according to Boogher p. 330) b. 1741, married Hugh Reece Bowen, who died October 7, 1780. The will names a daughter, Louisa, probably Margaret Louisa, and adds sons William, David, Jonathan, and James Jordan. The last may have been named for his mother's family. Evidently these five were the youngest children.
    [Note from Guy Smith: Very few Jordan in records of Augusta Co. No James Jordan.]

    The seal and signature are from Guy R. Smith historian for the Col. John Smith Society.

    JOHN SMITH - Will of 1753-- names wife and children-- see text
    Copied from: Settlers by the Long Grey Trail
    document provided by Guy R. Smith

  3. Court records, p. 205, Proved, 18th August, 1756.

    John Smith Jr. [son of Captain John & Margaret Smith b.1730], was killed at Fort Vause, June 25, 1756. John Smith's will P. 155 Wills--22 January, 1756 …to John Smith, son of brother Daniel Smith, the plantation on North River, Shanedoe, [Shenandoah ?] which testator bought of Silas Hart; to brother Daniel; to brother Abraham Smith; to brother Henry Smith. Executor, brother Daniel Smith. Proved, 18th August, 1756

    Either John or Joseph may have been the oldest son of Col. John and Margaret Smith if the House of Burgesses report is correct.]
    John Smith Jr. [son of Captain John & Margaret Smith b.1730], was killed at Fort Vause, June 25, 1756. John Smith's will P. 155 Wills--22 January, 1756 names several brothers. Proved, 18th August, 1756-- see actual text for partial transcription
    document provided by Guy R. Smith

  4. Court records, Proved, 18th August, 1756.

    John Smith Jr. [son of Captain John & Margaret Smith b.1730], was killed at Fort Vause, June 25, 1756. John Smith's will P. 155 Wills--22 January, 1756 …to John Smith, son of brother Daniel Smith, the plantation on North River, Shanedoe, [Shenandoah ?] which testator bought of Silas Hart; to brother Daniel; to brother Abraham Smith; to brother Henry Smith. Executor, brother Daniel Smith. Proved, 18th August, 1756

    John Smith Jr. [son of Captain John & Margaret Smith b.1730], was killed at Fort Vause, June 25, 1756. John Smith's will P. 155 Wills--22 January, 1756 names several brothers. Proved, 18th August, 1756-- see actual text for partial transcription
    document provided by Guy R. Smith

  5. Court records, Proved, 18th August, 1756.

    JOHN SMITH’S FT. VAUSE ADVENTURE
    1754-1763: French and Indian War. According to the World Book Encyclopedia, that war was the last and most important conflict over French and British possessions in North America. John Smith fought under George Washington in an unsuccessful attempt to force the French to leave their chain of forts along the Allegheny River in Pennsylvania in 1754. The French forces defeated them at Fort Duquesne (now Pittsburg, Pennsylvania). That campaign was the first battle of the French and Indian War. [Jean Carr & World Book Encyclopedia]
    1755 John Smith was Captain of Rangers. His company was at Fort Vause at the head of the Roanoke River (Shawsville) in the present county of Montgomery, about ten miles from Christiansburg, Virginia. He served until 1763. (Sandra's note: This differs from the Abercrombie report which calls him Major because according to Guy Smith, John Smith was in two different military units with different ranks in each.) (CF)
    1756 May 18, 1756: Formal declaration of war by England. June 9, 1756: Formal declaration of War by France.
    Major John Smith fought at Fort Vause, Virginia, which fell to French and Indian troops under the command of Monssieur Belester, commander of the Miamee Fort (Fort Miamee is near Toledo, Ohio). Major John Smith was captured by the French and held for two years. (CF)
    The original document of the Abercrombie extract #16 will provide…illuminating historical facts…concerning Col. John Smith's Fort Vause Adventure. The original document…can be found in the Public records office in London, England…The reference number is PRO 30/8/95. [Sandra's note: Apparently, Major John Smith wrote a journal during the time he was captured and transported. He described the Forts and the French forces and numbers of guns each fort held. He also took note of each Native American tribe, their size and feelings towards the British and Americans. Major John Smith gave this information to the British to help with the war efforts. Mr. Abercrombies's letter of Nov. 16th, 1757 to Mr. Wood contains extracts from Major (John) Smith's journal, 1756/7.]
    "…Major John Smith, Commander of a Company of Rangers on the Frontiers of Virginia, was prisoner for eleven months, taken with his party of ten men in a blockhouse towards the head of James River on the 25th of June 1756 by Monsieur Belester Com.der of Miamee Fort (about 500 miles from the head of James River) at the head of 205 Indians and 25 French Canadians of which party Major Smith killed 40 (and ) obliged Captain Belester to return without penetrating [Warwick] within 60 miles from Williamsburgh where he intended. According to the information of his [Shawnee] Indians, his spies who passed through the settlements of Virginia some [months] before as Cherokees and our friends... [Abercrombie 'extract' #16 page 2 of John Smith's journal transcribed by Guy Smith]
    "Putoataways [Guy Smith's note: probably Pottawatomie (Algonquian) tribe]. …of their towns, about 2000, inclined to come over to English for better trade…took Major Smith, into their counsel as a Sachem [a supreme or Political leader], went to their king, danced under the English colours, taken from Gen'l Bradock, and fired through the French colours, held council with Major Smith, agreed with him in a project formed by him for taking Fort Dequesne by their assistance with 1500 of their people. The intimacy [between] them and the Major being suspected, he was removed. He speaks the language." [Abercrombie 'extract' #16 page 3 of John Smith's journal transcribed by Guy Smith]
    Monday April 3d 1758, a Memorial was read - "To the President, Council, and House of Burgesses and referred to Consideration of the House", stating that in June 1756, the said Smith then in Fort Vaufs [sic], in Augusta, was attacked by the enemy, his eldest son killed and he was captured. "He has lost three sons and a great part of his Fortune in the service of his country." [Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia 1752-1755, 1756-1758].
    Note from Guy Smith: The three sons John lost in the war: Lt. John Smith, Joseph Smith, and most likely a Patrick Smith. The State historical Library in Wisconsin has Preston Papers which summarized from 1754 to end of war the people killed Feb 1756 Chalkely Vol 2-March 1756 Robert Looney was killed (he was a neighbor of the Smith family),.. Patrick Smith was killed. He was probably born in the colonies because he was not listed in the importation papers.
    John Smith Jr. [son of Captain John & Margaret Smith b.1730], was killed at Fort Vause, June 25, 1756. John Smith's will P. 155 Wills--22 January, 1756 …to John Smith, son of brother Daniel Smith, the plantation on North River, Shanedoe, [Shenandoah ?] which testator bought of Silas Hart; to brother Daniel; to brother Abraham Smith; to brother Henry Smith. Executor, brother Daniel Smith. Proved, 18th August, 1756

    Some sources list a son of Captain John Smith named Joseph, taken prisoner at Ft. Vause along with his father. [More information is found in Smith Cousins Four compiled by Zula Wood Atwood, Frank L. Eddens, Jr, Mildred Smith Shumaker, & Guy R. Smith hereafter referred to as (CF)]

    Monday April 3d 1758, a Memorial was read - "To the President, Council, and House of Burgesses and referred to Consideration of the House", stating that in June 1756, the said Smith then in Fort Vaufs [sic], in Augusta, was attacked by the enemy, his eldest son killed and he was captured. "He has lost three sons and a great part of his Fortune in the service of his country." [Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia 1752-1755, 1756-1758]. document provided by Guy R. Smith

  6. Utah Digital Newspapers. Newspaper article: Garfield County News. (http://www.lib.utah.edu/digital/unews/).

    Garfield County News. Newspaper 1927-05-27 page 5
    Source: D:\CDMPS\Utah-Garfield1\Stage4\gcn_19251106-19281130_78.prd
    Jessie Jolley, Leona Jolley and Ada Barton are working at Bryce Lodge.
    21 [May 1927, a girl born to] Mr. and Mrs. Leo Barton [another article has her born on 22 May]
    Mr. and Mrs. Harold Heaton and Mrs. Will Cox are here visiting relatives for one week.
    Leo Barton offered the invocation and Frank Riding the benediction at the funeral of Rebecca Quilter Allen {Mrs. Ellis H. Allen], 19 May 1927.

    Garfield County News. Newspaper 1927-05-27 page 5