Person:Cuthbert Bullitt (1)

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Judge Cuthbert Bullitt
d.27 August 1791
m. 1723
  1. Joseph Bullitt1724 - 1792
  2. Col. Thomas BullittABT 1725 - 1778
  3. Seth 'Sythe' Harrison Bullitt1728 - 1810
  4. Elizabeth Bullitt1732 -
  5. Judge Cuthbert BullittABT 1733 - 1791
  • HJudge Cuthbert BullittABT 1733 - 1791
  • WHelen Scott1737 - 1797
m. 1760
  1. Alexander Scott Bullitt1762 - 1816
  2. Thomas James Bullitt1765 - 1840
  3. Frances Bullitt1767 -
  4. Sarah Bullitt1769 -
  5. Eleanor Bullitt1771 - 1815
  6. Sophia Bullitt1773 - 1803
Facts and Events
Name Judge Cuthbert Bullitt
Alt Name Judge Cuthbert Bullett
Gender Male
Birth? ABT 1733 Fauquier County, Virginia
Marriage 1760 to Helen Scott
Death? 27 August 1791

Cuthbert Bullitt was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

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the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia
Cuthbert Bullitt (c.1740–1791) was a planter and lawyer from Prince William County, Virginia. He was a local and colonial political leader during the American Revolution. Bullitt was descended from French Huguenot immigrants. Cuthbert was one of the five children of Benjamin and Sarah (Harrison) Bullet. He and his brother Thomas Bullitt both settled in Prince William County and became locally prominent, Cuthbert as a planter and lawyer and Thomas as a soldier. Bullitt developed his plantation, known as Mount View on a peninsula where Quantico Creek enters the Potomac River. He married Helen Scott in the summer of 1761, and the couple had six children (Alexander Scott who became a pioneer settler in Louisville, Kentucky, Thomas James, Frances, Sarah, Helen, and Sophia. As the revolution neared, Bullitt became more active politically. He joined Prince William County's Committee of Safety along with Lynaugh Helm and Henry Lee. In 1776 he and Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee were the county's delegates to a revolutionary Provincial Congress of Virginia. That meeting became a constitutional convention, producing an interim constitution used by the province for the next several years. Under the new state's government, Bullitt became the Commonwealth Attorney (prosecutor) in Prince William County. He held that post until appointed to the bench of a state court in 1780. When the Virginia Ratifying Convention met to ratify the United States Constitution in 1788, Judge Bullitt was again the delegate for the County. He remained a judge until his death at Mount View in 1791.

Early Land Acquisition in Virginia

Acquisition of Land from Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants:


  • N-18: Cuthbert Bullett of Fauquier County, 400 acres on Opeckon in Frederick county. Surv. Thoms Rutherford. Adj. Mr. Page, George Henry, Capt. Charles Smith, Meredith Helm. 3 June 1766. [Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, 1742-1775, Vol. 2, Gertrude E. Gray, pg. 169].
  • P-292: Mr. Cuthbert Bullitt of Prince William County, 192 acres on New Creek in Hampshire County. Surv'd 18 May 1763 for Bullett by John Moffett and forfeited by Advertisement and recorded in Book N. Deed to Bullitt. Adj. Solomon Hedge. 19 Sept. 1774. [Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, 1742-1775, Vol. 2, Gertrude E. Gray, pg. 226].
  • P-293: Mr. Cuthbert Bullitt of Prince William County, 297 acres on New Creek in Hampshire County. Surv'd 18 May 1763 for Bullett by John Moffett and forfeited by Advertisement and recorded in Book N. Deed to Bullitt. Adj. John Douthitt. 19 Sept. 1774. [Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, 1742-1775, Vol. 2, Gertrude E. Gray, pg. 226].
  • I-327: Mr. Cuthbert Bullitt of Prince William County, 112 acres on Potowmack River in said County. Surv. John Moffett. Adj. Linton & Chilton, Kentu's corner, below Cockpit Point. 19 Sept. 1778. [Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, 1742-1775, Vol. 2, Gertrude E. Gray, pg. 108].


Disposition of Land from Chalkley's:


  • Page 144.--4th September, 1789. Cuthbert Bullitt, of Prince William, to John Oliver, power of attorney to lease for 21 years lands in Warm Springs Valley, except 150 acres on which Hot Springs are, and a small tract on which a mine is supposed to be. Teste: Richard Cary, Michael Bowyer. Page 144.--Teste: Wm. McPheeters. If Mr. Oliver cannot vacate the promise given for the Warren Spring tract, I will confirm it.

Records of Cutberth Bullitt in Augusta County, VA

From Chalkley’s Augusta County Records:


  • Page 376.--5th April, 1761. Same to Francis McBride, £150, 300 acres on Linvel's Creek, part of 500 acres purchased of Joseph Bryan, which is part of 1500 acres surveyed for William Linvells. Teste: Cuthbert Bullett Delivered: Francis McBride, June, 1762.
  • Page 147.--21st November, 1766. Thomas Bullett, of Fauquier County, of 1st part; Thomas and Andrew Lewis, of 2nd part. The parties had taken up 300 acres including the Little Warm Springs, and entered into agreement in regard to a division thereof and managament. This is a deed of partition. Delivered: Hon. Cuthbert Bullitt. 10th September, 1789.
  • P-263: John Cunningham of Frederick County, 157 acres on Opeccon in said County. Surv. Thomas Rutherford. Adj. Meredith Helm, William Helm, Mr. Page or Carter, Cuthbert Bullitt. 21 Apr. 1774. [Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, 1742-1775, Vol. 2, Gertrude E. Gray, pg. 224].
  • Page 144.--4th September, 1789. Cuthbert Bullitt, of Prince William, to John Oliver, power of attorney to lease for 21 years lands in Warm Springs Valley, except 150 acres on which Hot Springs are, and a small tract on which a mine is supposed to be. Teste: Richard Cary, Michael Bowyer.
  • Vol. 2 - McPheeters vs. Moffett--Original deed, William McPheeters, Sr., to William McPheeters, Jr., 1755. Copy deed, Beverley, to William Vance, 23d July, 1740. Deposition of Margaret Brown, 25th August, 1798: She lived on the land in dispute 60 years ago. Memorandum, 1790-91. Memorandum for Mr. Williams. Enquire after Elliott Rutherford, executor to his brother, Thomas Rutherford, who died about 20 years ago. Spencer Hill married Mary Rutherford, daughter of Thomas Rutherford, deceased, and her fortune is in the hands of Elliott, who lives about one mile from Rockingham Courthouse. Joseph Borden, letter to Cosen Jacob Peck. Cuthbert Bullett's letter. Alexander Stuart's letter, 12th February, to Mr. John Wilson, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, says John is eldest son and heir of George Wilson, deceased, who sold a lot in Staunton to Mr. Mathew Reid. Part of purchase money is due which Archibald offers to pay upon making a deed. James Russell's letter, 24th March, 1791, brother of Joseph Russell. Edward Day's petition for help in support of his family, three children, one an idiot. Edward is old and infirm. 14th April, 1791. W. Erwin's letter to William Anderson, 17th March, 1791. William is brother of Samuel Anderson. Owen Owens' letter, 29th July, 1791, to James Lyle.
  • Vol. 2 - Trigg and wife vs. Reuben Slaughter--O. S. 357; N. S. 129--Bill, 6th August, 1808, by Clement Trigg and wife Sarah. On 17th of September, 1775, Thomas Bullett made his will, devising to Sarah, then infant, land on Kenawha. Orator and oratrix moved to the land and found it claimed by defendant. The remainder of the tract was devised to Cuthbert Bullitt, who is dead. On 24th October, 1805, Barbara Bullitt and Susannah Redd certified that they believed Sarah Trigg to be the natural daughter of Col. Thos. Bullitt on Martha Bronsant. Will of Thomas Bullitt of Fauquier. Brother, Joseph Bullitt; devisee, Sarah Bronauant, daughter of Martha Bronaunt; sister, Seth Combs; legatee, Benj. Harrison. Ditto Cuthbert Combs. Brother, Cuthbert Bullitt. Dated 17th September, 1775. Proved in Fauquier, 23d February, 1778.


Information on Cuthbert Bullitt

John Baylis was killed in a duel at Dumfries, Virginia on September 24, 1765. The facts about the unfortunate duel that led to his death are generally agreed upon, but there are several versions of the circumstances leading up to the duel. John Scott, the eighteen-year-old son of Reverend James Scott, challenged John Baylis to a duel. At the appointed time John Scott appeared with his brother-in-law, Cuthbert Bullitt, as his second. Bullitt took the place of John Scott and in the ensuing confrontation shot John Baylis in the groin. Baylis died about five hours later at Rippon Lodge, where - it is believed - he is also buried. While a jury acquitted Cuthbert Bullitt, feeling against John Scott as the challenger of the duel was so high that Scott had to leave Virginia. Bullitt also soon left Virginia and settled in Kentucky.
[Source: http://erwinbagpiper.com/baylis_family.htm]


From "Annals of Bath County, Virginia", by Oren F. Morton, pg. 47:


As early a 1778, Cuthbert Bullitt, then a resident of this valley, petitioned the assembly that 50 acres of his land be laid off into lots and a town established at "Little Warm Springs," this being the early name for the Hot Springs. He remarks that it was extremely difficult to procure building materials.


From "Historical sketches of Virginia Hot Springs, Warm Sulphur Springs and Bath County, Virginia", by Joseph Thompson McAllister:


In 1791, Cuthbert Bullitt, who was at the time a resident of Prince William County, died. By his will be disposed of a large landed estate, some of which was in Kentucky. He, or his executors, conveyed the Hot Springs to Nathaniel Wilkinson, or Henrico County, who very soon associated with him in the ownership of John Oliver, John Carter Littlepage, Miles King and Benjamin Thompson.
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