Person:Warren Weydemeyer (1)

Watchers
Warren I. Weydemeyer
b.18 May 1846 Flint, Genesee, MI
d.16 Jul 1928 Toledo, Lincoln, OR
  1. Sarah Elizabeth Weydemeyer1833 - 1913
  2. Philetus Robert Weydemeyer1838 - 1927
  3. Warren I. Weydemeyer1846 - 1928
m. 16 Mar 1873
  1. Helen Mabel Weydemeyer1877 - 1960
  2. Frederick Weydemeyer1882 - 1886
Facts and Events
Name Warren I. Weydemeyer
Gender Male
Birth? 18 May 1846 Flint, Genesee, MI
Marriage 16 Mar 1873 Elkland, Tuscola, MIto Harriet Elizabeth Predmore
Death? 16 Jul 1928 Toledo, Lincoln, OR
Burial? Toledo, Lincoln, Oregon

CENSUS: 1860 Federal Census, Tuscola Co., MI. Page 8, Elkland, post office = Watsonville. Ann Weydemeyer, age 44, female, domestic, real estate = $300, personal estate = $100, born NJ. Philetus R. Weydemeyer, age 21, male, farmer, real estate = $300, born NJ. Warren Weydemeyer, age 14, male, born MI.


1870 Federal Census, Tuscola Co., MI. Elkland, page 11. Philetus R. Weydemeyer, age 31, M, W, general merchant, real estate = $1300., personal estate = $1000., born NJ. Mary E. Weydemeyer [wife], age 25, born MI, keeps house. Homer Weydemeyer, age 2, born MI. Warren Weydemeyer, [no age], dealer in dry goods, real estate = $1300., personal estate = $1000., born MI.


http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1880usfedcen&h=6773929&indiv=try&o_iid=024455&o_lid=024455&offerid=76%3a0%3a0 1880 United States Federal Census about W. Weydmeyer Name: W. Weydmeyer Home in 1880: Precinct 5, Fannin, Texas Age: 33 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1847 Birthplace: Michigan Relation to Head of Household: Self (Head) Spouse's Name: H. E. Father's birthplace: New Jersey Mother's birthplace: New Jersey Occupation: Farmer Marital Status: Married Race: White Gender: Male Household Members: Name Age W. Weydmeyer 33 H. E. Weydmeyer 20 M. H. Weydmeyer 3 92 93 Weydmeyer W., w, m, 33, _, _, _, married, farmer, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, MI, NJ, NJ. H. E., w, f, 20, _, wife, married, keeps house, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, MI, NJ, NJ. M. H., w, f, 3, _, dau, single, at home, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, MI, NJ, NJ. Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: Precinct 5, Fannin, Texas; Roll: T9_1303; Family History Film: 1255303; Page: 559.3000; Enumeration District: 129; .



1900 Federal Census, Arenac Co., MI, Turner twp. Weydemier, Warren, head of household, white, male, b. May 1846 in MI, age 54, married 27 yrs, father b. PA, mother b. NJ, hotel keeper, employed year round, owns own home free of mortgage. Also listed in this household are his wife; brother, Philetus; his mother-in-law, Hattie Predmore; Etta Predmore; plus 8 boarders and 3 servants. This household was made up of items 81 thru 96 on the census sheet. 1900 Federal Census, Arenac Co., MI, Turner twp; 2 June 1900. Warren Weydemier, head of household, white, male, born May 1846, age 54, married 27 years, born MI, father born Penn., mother born NJ, Hotel Keeper, employed year round, owns house free of mortgage. Hattie Weydemier, wife, white, female, born March 1857, age 43, married 27 years, 2 children, 1 living; born MI, both parents born NJ. Philetus R. Weydemier, brother, white, male, born Dec. 1838, age 61, married 35 years, born NJ, Merchant, employed year round, owns home free of mortgage. Hattie Predmore, mother-in-law, white, female, born Oct. 1830, age 69, widow, married 52 years, 5 children, 4 living, she and both parents born NJ. Etta Predmore, sister-in-law, white, female, born Aug. 1855, age 44, married 25 years, had 1 child, 0 children living; born MI, father born PA, mother born NJ. There were 8 boarders and 3 servants living with the Warren Weydemeyer family. They were probably operating a boarding house as they later did in Moscow, ID. Warren's daughter, Mable Johnson and family were apparently living in the adjoining residence. This family were items 97, 98, and 99 on the census sheet. [Howard Johnston note]. 12 July 1984].


WEYDEMEYA, WARREN (1910 U.S. Census) IDAHO , LATAH, W MOSCOWAge: 0, Male, Born: MISeries: T624 Roll: 225 Page: 209 215 227 Weydemeyer, Warren, head, w, m, 63, m1, -, -, -, MI, NJ, NJ, -. -, English, fruit grower, OA, -, -, yes, yes, -, O, F, F, 2, 0, 0.

                                   Hattie, wife, w, f, 52, m1, 25, 3, 1, MI, NJ, NJ, -. -, English, housekeeper, ?, -, -, yes, yes, -, -, N, G.
              Johnson, Mable, dau, w, f, 32, m1, 12, 2, 2, MI, MI, MI, -, -, English, -, -, -, -, -, yes, yes
                             Rosco C., son in law, m, w, 36, m1, -, -, MI, Canada, Canada, -. -, English, none, -, -, -, -, yes, yes
                             Harry, son, m, w, 10, s, -, -, -, MI, MI, MI, -. -, English, -, -, -, yes, 6, yes, yes, yes.
                             Vernon, son, m,w, 6, s, -, -, -,  MT, MI, OH, -. -, English, -, -, -, -, -, yes, yes, yes.
             Marston, Bert, partner, m, w, 33, s, -, -, -, MI, WI, ?, -. -, English, -, -, -, -, -, yes, yes.

JOHNSTON, ROSCO C (1920 U.S. Census) OREGON , LINCOLN, N TOLEDO PCTAge: 47, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: MISeries: T625 Roll: 1495 Page: 135 73 73 Johnston, Rosco C., head, O, M, m, w, 47, m, -, -, -, -, yes, yes, B. Mich., f. b. Maine, m. b. Canada, English, yes, farmer, general, O.A., 61. Mable H., wife, -, -, f, w, 42, m, -, -, -, -, yes, yes, she & parents b. Mich., yes, none. Vernon, son, -, -, m, w, 18, s, -, -, -, yes, yes, yes, b. *Mich., parents b. Mich., yes, none. Weydemeyer, Warren, father-in-law & partner, m, w, 72, Wd, -, -, -, -, yes, yes, b. Mich., parents b. NJ, yes, none. Philetus, R., X, -, -, m, w, 81, Wd, -, -, -, -, yes, yes, he & parents b. NJ, yes, none, Johnson, Matilda R., mother, -, -, f, w, 75, Wd, Un, Un, -, -, yes, yes, b. Canada, LC, f. b. England, English, m. b. England, English, yes, none. Resides Pioneer Road.

  • obvious mistake by census taker - well documented he was born in Montana.

MARRIAGE: Warren Weydemeyer of Elkland, age 27, born MI, marries Hattie E. Predmore of Elmwood, age 16, born MI, on March 16, 1873. Marriage performed by James S. Deming, minister of the gospel. Witnesses: Ephraim deming and James Adamson of Elkland. Marriage took place at Elkland. Recorded Apr. 2, 1873. Source: Vol. 3, page 40, Tuscola Co., MI Marriage Records SLC FILM 983816 6/12/85.

MARRIAGE: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/mi/county/huron/HuronMarriages.html

Huron County Marriages --  From the Dibean Collection

1,WEYDEMEYER_W,WARREN I WEYDEMEYER(1),PREDMORE,HARRIET ELIZABETH PREDMORE,HURON,YES,16 MAR 1873,(/),dibeanjack@juno.com

RESIDENCE: http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=flmtkal1905&h=2384&indiv=try&o_iid=024455&o_lid=024455&offerid=76%3a0%3a0 Flathead County, MT, 1905 - 1906 Kalispell City Directory and Flathead County Directory about W Weydemeyer Given Name: W Surname: Weydemeyer Land Status: homestead Land Description: $50 City: Harrisburg Source Information: Sewell, Patricia, comp. Flathead County, MT, 1905 - 1906 Kalispell City Directory and Flathead County Directory [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2001. Original data: R.L. Polk & Co's Kalispell City Directory and Flathead County City Directory 1905-1906. R.L. Polk & Co; Evans & McMurray Publishers, 1905-1906. Mansfield Library, Special Collections Section, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, 59802.

HISTORY: Warren Weydemeyer was appointed Postmaster of Cass City, MI, Feb. 17, 1876, when he replaced his brother-in-law, John C. Laing. Warren was replaced as postmaster March 4, 1878. Warren was again appointed postmaster Dec. 29, 1881 and served in that post until Sept. 2, 1885.

HISTORY:

       RECALLS TRIP TO THE U. P. LUMBER WOODS BACK IN 1886 
    When G. A. Striffler, who has just reached his 81st milestone in life's journey, read recently about the old ferry S. S. Algomah being retired from active service and being now used as a part of a breakwater at Mackinaw City, he recalled to mind that he crossed the Straits of Mackinaw on the Algomah on May 1, 1888.  It was on the "up" trip Mr. Striffler made when he started working in the lumber woods in the Upper Peninsula.  The Algomah was then seven years old.  Henry Ford, as a mechanic's apprentice, helped install the engines in the boat back in 1881 when she was built in Detroit. 
    Mr. Striffler was employed by the firm of Weydemeyer & Work.  Members of the firm were Warren and P. R. Weydemeyer, Wilson Kane, and King Work, names familiar to pioneer residents of this community.  These early residents of Cass City had purchased timber land on the Escanaba River and Mrs. Warren Weydemeyer and her 12-year-old daughter, Mabel, were the camp cooks. 
    "When we stopped at Negaunee on the trip to the woods, King Work and I went to see an iron mine," Mr. Striffler remarked.  "The mine shaft was about five feet in diameter and as King Work glanced down the hole, he remarked, 'I wouldn't work down there for $5 a day.'  A big Swede, standing by, replied, 'I'd like to get a job there at $1.50 a day.'  That, of course, was 59 years ago." 

From a newspaper clipping from an unidentified newspaper found in Mabel Johnston's Bible.

HISTORY: "A good share of the homesteaders who came to the Fortine area at this time settled in the Mud Creek - Grave Creek section. From Michigan came a whole tribe of relatives and acquaintances from the vicinity of Detroit, some of whom remained to become long-time residents of the valley. On upper Mud Creek there were Mr. & Mrs. Warren Weydemeyer and their daughter & son-in-law, the Roscoe Johnsons (who later went on to the Oregon coast); Mrs. Warren Weydemeyer's mother, Mrs. Predmore; Warren's brother, P. R. Weydemeyer and his wife, her brother, Emory Nash, and their son, Harry, and Harry's wife, the former Margaret Campbell. Margaret Weydemeyer's parents and brothers and sisters livere also for a year or two, and in later years became residents of Kalispell, where Grant and Harry Campbell still live. P. R. Weydemeyer filed one of the earliest water-rights on Grave Creek." By Margaret & Harry Weydemeyer, page 164, "The Story of the Tobacco Plains Country", edited by Olga Weydemyer (Mrs. Pete Johnson), published 1950 by the "Pioneers of the Tobacco Plains Country."

LAND: Book 20, page 471. Philetus R. Weydemeyer to Warren Weydemeyer. Recorded April 23, 1869. Indenture made 20 March 1869. Philetus R. Weydemeyer & wife Mary of Tuscola Co. to Warren Weydemeyer of same place, for $30., all the undivided 1/2 of lot 1 and the undivided 1/2 of the N 1/2 of lots 7 & 8 in Block 3 in Cass City. Witness: John C. Laing. SOURCE: Tuscola Co., MI Deeds, Vol. 19 & 20, SLC FILM 980668 5/16/85. < http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txfannin/top2.html Fannin County TXGenWeb This map was provided by Billy Suitor who has the original. The scans were pieced together. This was published first in 1927, by the Texas State Agricultural System This copy is from the 1939 reprint of the 1927 edition. I have added the arrows as not all the names were easy to read in the scans. The red Circles were already on the original copy. Notes below the map. (Image of the area at this site - HVJ note). Michigan School (Many people settled here from Michigan) names settling there first: Weydemeyer, Kane, Zinnecker, Miller, Brode, Saylor, Birsall, Hixons, Meyers, Morris, Fox, Sherwood. School used until c1935 < TEXAS LAND RECORDS

   Obligation To Settle 

The State of Texas, County of Fannin. I, Warren Weidemeyer having purchased from the State of Texas 160 acres of land being the SE 1/4 of Section No. 8 as surveyed by the M E & P RR Co., situated in Fannin County, do promise and agree to settle upon and improve said land within 12 months from this date as required by the provisions of Section 5 of the act of April 24th 1874. And it is expressly understood that I am to comply strictly with all the conditions and requirements and am subjected to all the Penalties contained and prescribed in said act of April 24th 1874. /s/ Warren Weydemeyer dated 5 August 1878. <

                     Application 

To the county surveyor Fannin County. In accordance with the provisions of an act to provide for the sale of the alternate sections of lands as surveyed by Railroad companies and set apart for the benefit of the common school fund approved April 24th 1874, the undersigned intending to settle within the time prescribed in the above recited act. hereby applies for a survey as follows. In Fannin County known as the South East Quarter of section no. 8, as surveyed by the M E & P RR Co. /s/ Warren Weydemeyer date 5 August 1878. < Vol. 9, #613. L. S. Ross, governor of Texas, grants to Warren Weydemeyer 160 acres of land: In Fannin Co., being subdivision No. 4, the SE 1/4 of Sect. 8 surveyed by MEP & P RR CO. Cert. No. 69 on the waters of Sanders Creek about 18 miles N E from Bonham, Said Land having been purchased and fully paid for in accordance with an act to provide for the sale of alternate sections of Lands Surveyed by RR Co's & set apart for the benefit of the common school fund approved April 24, 1874. Dated 8 January 1890 at the city of Austin. < http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=txlandgrants&h=140968&indiv=try&o_iid=024455&o_lid=024455&offerid=76%3a0%3a0 Texas Land Title Abstractsabout Warren Weydemeyer Grantee: Warren Weydenmeyer Patentee: Warren Weydemeyer Patent Date: 8 Jan 1890 Acres: 160 District: Fannin County: Fannin File: 1652 Survey/Blk/Tsp: SE 1/4 8 League 12- Patent #: 613 Patent Volume: 9 Class: School Source Information: Ancestry.com. Texas Land Title Abstracts [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000. Original data: Texas General Land Office. Abstracts of all original Texas Land Titles comprising Grants and Locations. Austin, TX, USA. < LATAH CO., ID LAND RECORDS 11 June 1906. REAL MORTGAGE. Instrument # 40592. Hattie E. & Warren Weydemeyer mortgage a piece of property, 75 acres for $450. Two years. 7% interest. 11 June 1906. Instrument # 40591. Hattie Weydemeyer purchases 80 acres from Matilda and S. H. Knepper for $1600. 11 June 1906. Instrument # 40593. Hattie & Warren Weydemeyer sell 4 acres to Nettie Brickey. 3 April 1908. Instrumen # 63929. Netherlands American Mortgage Bank certifies the mortgage taken out on 11 June 1906 by Hattie & Warren Weydemeyer is fully paid and satisfied on 3 April 1908. Filed for record, June 9, 1913. 11 June 1913. Instrument # 63930. Hattie & Warren Weydemeyer take a $440. mortgage on some property with the Netherlands American Mortgage Bank. 22 Dec. 1913. WARRANTY DEED. Instrument # 65804. Hattie & Warren Weydemeyer sell property to Mr. & Mrs. George Wolfbrandt for $4500. 12 July 1919. Hattie & Warren Weydemeyer pay off the mortgage of $440. taken out June 11, 1913 with the Netherlands American Mortgage Bank. Research by Howard Johnston, 4 Jan. 1985, in Moscow, ID.

DEATH: Oregon State Board of Health Certificate of Death; State # 34; Local # 27. Cause of death given as senility. Age at death: 83 yrs 1 mo 26 days. Date of Birth listed as: 20 May 1835. [An obvious mistake. Howard Johnston note.] Birthplace listed as Flint, MI. Father is listed as John Weydemeyer, born PA scratched out, NJ written after that. Mother's maiden name listed as Kane, born NJ. Informant is listed as Roscoe Johnston. Date of death listed as July 16, 1928. SOURCE: Records of Howard Johnston.

LAND: Index to the 1894 and 1906 Land and Plat Atlas, Sanilac County, Michigan. This is an index to the Patrons Directory at the rear of the atlas. This index does not include the individual map pages. A great big special THANKS to Judith King for her hard work providing this information.

 name                     yr         twp        section

Weydemeyer, W.; 1894; Greenleaf; 34. [Don't really know if this if for "my" Warren Weydemeyer or not - Howard Johnston note. Found on Internet: http://www.rootsweb.com/~misanila/


LAND: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/c/o/l/Dan--Collins/GENE19-0005.html?Welcome=1000268651

HISTORY OF MICHIGAN PRAIRIE By Ms. Flora Brode McKee, Honey Grove, TX

    In 1877, there were only two or three families living on a broad prairie of several square miles along the eastern edge of Fannin County, about eight miles northeast of Honey Grove. 
    That year two brothers Warren and Philetus Weydemeyer came from Michigan looking for new country. They learned of this prairie as Public School lands available for $2.50 per acre and immediately bought, prepared to build and sent for their families. 
    Glowing reports reached Michigan and soon other families sold and headed for the Lone Star State. They came bv train, the Texas & Pacific Railway having been built through Honey Grove about 1873.   Among the first to come in the Spring of 1878 were the David Kane and Charles Zinnecker families. They were followed by Jerry and John Miller, Robert Brode, the Saylors, Birdsalls, Hixons, Meyers, Morrises, Foxes, Sherwoods, and others — 25 to 30 families. All bought land, some a section, some a half or quarter section. They erected substantial and some handsome homes. 
    They engaged in farming, some, especially the Weydemeyers and Zinneckers, in cattle and horses. At first the wild land was unfenced, but soon the pastures had to be fenced and grazing was not so profitable. 
    The community was called "Michigan Prairie" and had a Church and School District for many years. The church burned in the 1920's, but the school operated until consolidation with Honey Grove in about 1935 or 1940. 
    Gradually the farming land changed to grazing. People moved and houses were deserted, so that the area lost its identity as a neighborhood. It is identifiable now by names of land surveys on the Fannin County Map, such as: Thos. Sherwood, John Miller, John Kane, Massengale and Weidedenger (this last one being in error for the original Weydemeyer which can be found on an older map cica 1890). 

WHEN MICHIGAN MOVED TO TEXAS (Honey Grove SIGNAL, 1927)

    For half a century there has been a community seven miles northeast of Honey Grove known as the "Michigan Settlement".  While very few if any of those who came to us from Michigan reside there now the name still clings to the community and will do so perhaps until the end of time. 
    It was in 1877, 50 years ago, that this section of country received its name. Prior to that time, that portion of the country that had been sparsely settled, only two or three families living on the broad prairie of several square miles. In 1877 Warren Wydemeyer and his brother Philetus, tiring of their residence in Michigan and being of a somewhat restless nature, accepted the advice of Horace Greeley and turned their faces westward. One fine day they shows up in Honey Grove and began looking over the country, contiguous thereto.   They wandered out northeast to the prairie which now bears the name of Michigan, and were charmed with the country. Upon

investigation they learned that this particular section of the moral vineyard was state school land and could be purchased for the modest sum of $2.50 per acre. They immediately purchased land and made ready to build, in the meantime sending for their families.

    They sent such glowing reports of Texas back to Michigan that a furor was created in the community in which they had lived and the Texas fever spread from family to family. They sold their possessions there and headed for the Lone Star State. Among the first to follow the Weydemeyers were David Kane and wife and their seven children. Mr. Kane soon after his arrival made a large purchase of land. The next spring Charles Zinnecker came. He bought land and began the erection of a home. Six months later, upon the completion of his residence he was joined by his family. By this time an organized line of immigration was formed from Michigan to Texas. Among those who came were Jerry and John Miller, R. Brode, the Emorys, Saylors, Birdsalls, Hixons, Meyers, Morris, Sherwoods, Foxes and others. The names of all who came cannot be given, but there were 25 to 30 families and

from 100 to 150 people in the settlement. All who came bought land, some a section, some a half-section and some a quarter-section. All built homes, most of the houses being handsome and substantial structures. All of the settlers engaged in farming, but some gave special attention to cattle and horses. This was especially true of the Weydemeyers and Zinneckers.

    None of the wild land was fenced at that time, and cattle had a wide range. Soon, however, the pastures were fenced and cattle raising was not so profitable. The Weydemeyers and Mr. Zinnecker took their cattle to the Wichita country. In order to get the benefit of pasture, they had to take up government land. This they soon relinquished, the land not being worth the taxes. These lands are now in the center of a big oil field, worth thousands of dollars per acre. 
    Of the heads of families who came from Michigan fifty years ago and established the Michigan settlement, it is believed that W.C. Zinnecker is the only one now living.

DIRECTORY:

     Surname: Weydemeyer
     Given Name: W
     Land Status: homestead
     Land Description: $50
     City: Harrisburg

Source: Flathead County, MT, 1905 - 1906 Kalispell City Directory and Flathead County Directory.

DEATH: http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=ordeath&h=180718&indiv=try&o_iid=024455&o_lid=024455&offerid=76%3a0%3a0 Oregon Death Index, 1903-98 about Warren Weydemeyer Name: Weydemeyer, Warren County: Lincoln Death Date: 16 Jul 1928 Certificate: 34

BURIAL: "Weydemeyer, Warren (1845-1928)" Toledo Pioneer Cemetery, Toledo, Oregon http://ftp.wi.net/~census/lesson18.html