Person:James Walker (103)

Watchers
James Walker
b.3 Jun 1767 PA
d.8 Jan 1848
m. Est 1762
  1. Samuel Walker1763 - 1832
  2. John Walker1764 - 1841
  3. James Walker1767 - 1848
  4. William Walker1770 - 1844
  5. Robert Walker1773 - 1855
  6. George Walker1780 - 1845
  7. Sarah Walker1780 - Aft 1840
  8. Mary Walker1781 -
  9. Margaret Walker1781 - 1858
Facts and Events
Name James Walker
Gender Male
Birth[1] 3 Jun 1767 PA
Marriage 26 Feb 1807 Trumbull, Ohio, United Statesto Sarah Burnett
Death[2] 8 Jan 1848
Burial[3] Walker Family Cemetery, Pleasant Valley, Johnson, Iowa

Contents

Walker Tapestry
Register
Data
Notebooks
Analysis
Bibliography
Graphics
Index
YDNA. Walker
Chalkley's

……………………..The Tapestry
Families Old Chester OldAugusta Germanna
New River SWVP Cumberland Carolina Cradle
The Smokies Old Kentucky

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Related

Notebook:James Walker (103) for data capture.
Robert Walker 1630-1690 Descendancy
YDNA Walker Group 33

Overview

YDNA Group-33 Reconstruction

In their personal biographies (History of Johnson County, Iowa) Joseph, Henry, and James, sons of James Walker and Mary/Sarah Burnett, both give their places of birth as Portage, Ohio. There is a record for a James Walker in Portage County in 1830, lilving in Streetsboro, Portage County. Though the record is almost entirely unreadable this could be a record for James (103).

This James Walker was apparent forced to leave the community in 1827:

The Overseers of the Poor, who more properly should have been termed the Rooters-out of the Poor, were very efficient officers, and were determined that Streetsboro should have no poor to oversee; so, accordingly, three days after the election of those officials, they issued an order to Constable Thomas to notify James Walker and family to leave the township, to which they paid no attention, but a second order being served some time afterward on Walker, ac- companied by the information that if he did not wish himself and family to be put up for sale to the highest bidder, they quickly took themselves off.History of Portage County, Ohio, Internet Archive

This is consistent with a story told by dscendant Robert Walker

An oral history is alive and kicking, however, in 75-year-old Robert Walker, who lives with his wife near the original Walker homestead. He's the kind of guy who stuffs his overall pockets with film canisters in which the innards represent riddles. And he loves to tell stories.... The Walkers had been kicked out of Portage County, Ohio, for being poor, Walker said.
"They had about nine kids, and they were poor," he said. "So two brothers came in the spring, and two in the fall, and the four of them built a house. They went over to Davenport to cut wood for the steam ship in the wintertime to make money."

Those first settlers were Robert, Samuel, James and Joseph Walker, who were probably somewhere between 18 and 28 at the time.

IOWA GenWeb, Walker Pioneer Family originally published in the IOwa City Press Citizen, Sarah Langenberger, 2001.

Where James (103) and family were living after 1827 is not clear, but it seems likely that he soon returned to Streetsborough, as a James Walker appears there in the 1830 census [4]

Notes

  1. Interpolated from Gravestone. See Notebook:James Walker (103) for details
  2. From Gravestone. See Notebook:James Walker (103) for details
  3. See Ancestry Tree, Miller Family Tree, image of Gravestone, viewed 23 August, 2011
  4. The census record is largely unreadable. Even the name "James Walker" is difficult to see.

This line is identified as that of a Walker YDNA project participant whose YDNA signature matches that of the Walkers Creek Line of Wigton Walkers. The Walkers Creek line traces descent to John Walker I of Wigton Scotland, though this can be questioned. Those pursuing the line of this James Walker, trace their descent to a line of Walkers who settled in the Cumberland Valley of PA, and ultimately to a Robert Walker who lived in Letterkenny, Ireland in the late 1600's. If the lineage is correct, this would seem to indicate that there were two independent immigrations to America involved.