WeRelate Crowdsourcing Challenge

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WeRelate Crowdsourcing Challenge

WeRelate Crowdsourcing Challenge


The Challenge is intended to be a monthly feature, beginning on or around the 1st of each month and ending at the end of the month.

Thanks for playing. Good luck!


Contents

Current Challenges

Here are the current challenges for this month and last month.

This Month: June

People across the United States celebrate Flag Day on June 14th each year to honor the United States flag and to commemorate the flag’s adoption.

On June 14, 1777, the U.S. Continental Congress replaced the British symbols of the Grand Union flag with a new design featuring 13 white stars in a circle on a field of blue and 13 red and white stripes, one for each state. Although no longer certain based on recent analysis of evidence, the creation of this flag has historically been credited to the Philadelphia seamstress Betsy Ross, who was an official flag maker for the Pennsylvania Navy. In 1952, the U.S. Post Office issued a commemorative postage stamp to honor the 200th Anniversary/Bicentennial of her birth. The painting shown here is an artistic rendering of Betsy Ross presenting the original flag to General George Washington.

In June 1886, Bernard Cigrand, a Wisconsin native attending dental school in Chicago, made his first public proposal for the annual observance of the birth of the flag when he wrote an article titled “The Fourteenth of June” in the old Chicago Argus newspaper. Cigrand’s effort to ensure national observance of Flag Day finally came to fruition when President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation calling for a nationwide observance of the event on June 14, 1916. However, Flag Day did not become official until August 1949, when President Harry Truman signed the legislation and proclaimed June 14 as Flag Day. In 1966, Congress also requested that the President issue annually a proclamation designating the week in which June 14 occurs as National Flag Week. Cigrand is credited with being the "Father of Flag Day," with the Chicago Tribune noting that he "almost singlehandedly" established the holiday.

The American flag, also nicknamed as “Old Glory” or “star-spangled banner,” has changed designs over the past two centuries. It now consists of 13 equal horizontal stripes of red (top and bottom) alternating with white, with a blue rectangle in the canton bearing 50 small, white, five-pointed stars. Each of the 50 stars represents one of the 50 states in the United States and the 13 stripes represent the original 13 colonies that became the first states in the Union.

You can join this month's challenge and help bring the WeRelate pages on these two people to life.

Last Month: May

Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in service of the United States of America. It was borne out of the Civil War and a desire to honor our dead.

It was officially proclaimed on 5 May 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, in his General Order No. 11: “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land,” he proclaimed. The date of Decoration Day, as he called it, was chosen because it was not the anniversary of any particular battle.

In 1915, inspired by the poem “In Flanders Fields,” Moina Michael conceived of an idea to wear red poppies on Memorial day in honor of those who died serving the nation during war. She was the first to wear one, and sold poppies to her friends and co-workers with the money going to benefit servicemen in need. In 1948 the U.S. Post Office honored Ms. Michael for her role in founding the National Poppy movement by issuing a red 3 cent postage stamp with her likeness on it.

In 1968, President Johnson signed the Uniform Holiday Bill, permanently assigning the celebration of Memorial Day on the last Monday in May. The National Holiday Act of 1971 legally observed a three-day holiday commemoration for Memorial Day weekend. The “National Moment of Remembrance” resolution was passed in 2000 which pronounced 3 p.m. (local time) on each Memorial Day as a time for all Americans, “To voluntarily and informally observe in their own way a moment of remembrance and respect, pausing from whatever they are doing for a moment of silence or listening to ‘Taps'.”

Congratulations to the winners of May's Memorial Day personality challenge, User:Khaentlahn (for John Logan's page) and User:Btomp (for Moina Michael's page).

Challenge Details

Purpose, Objective & Goal

  • This challenge, primarily, is intended to be fun, educational and rewarding.
  • It is also designed to help users, participants and WeRelate members strengthen their research skills, enhance wiki-page proficiency, work toward data-entry mastery, and provide practical experience in validating and substantiating factual events with supporting sources in a collaborative, crowdsourcing environment.

How to Play the Game

  • Select the subject page or pages during the period of the challenge and add vital statistics, factual events, and historical data which is supported by reliable primary and secondary sources.
  • Whoever enters the most valid edits on the subject page(s) before the challenge is closed at the end of the month wins the challenge (as reviewed and approved by the program manager).
  • Save the page after each event post, fact update, or additional source inclusion.
  • Primary sources should be sought and used.
  • Keep in mind the basic WR guidelines about not entering any information about living people.
  • Ensure any images you add to the page(s) are in the public domain or meet acceptable exceptions to copyright laws.
  • Each challenge will end at midnight on the last day of each month.
  • Challenge winners will be determined by the contest manager.
  • Each winner will receive a special graphic badge added to their user page showing their research prowess.

Award Points

Challenge will be based on additions and edits of information, which will be awarded points for credit.

  • Contributors will receive one full point for each event addition or data edit on the page.
  • All genealogy event edits should be supported by valid sources recorded on the page for each event.
  • Each valid supporting source or bibliographical reference entered will also be given a full point.
  • Since the purpose of all genealogy is to expand family lines, challenge points will be granted for the addition of connected family members as well, such as identifying information and genealogical data for parents, spouse(s), and children not previously entered in WeRelate.

Examples of edits that will win points:

  • Reference to vital records such as birth, marriage and death certificates.
  • Census data linked to an online source.
  • Photos of the subject or source references.
  • Mention of the subject in a biography, history book or genealogy book.
  • Inclusion in a newspaper article.
  • Burial information and photos of a headstone.
  • Edits that correct an error or resolve a dispute of information gleaned from an earlier source may also receive a point at the discretion of the manager.
  • Finding and linking to subject's Wikipedia page or Wikidata reference. (Remember that Wikipedia and Wikidata are compiled "knowledge base" references, so should not be considered as primary sources.)

Past Subjects & Winners

Challenge Awards

  • A WINNER award badge will be posted on the user page of each challenge winner (with at least three creditable edits).
  • A PLAYER badge will be presented to other contenders who enter at least three approved edits on the subject page during the challenge period.
  • Subject pages not receiving at least three edits will be considered not to have a winner.