WeRelate Crowdsourcing Challenge

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WeRelate Crowdsourcing Challenge

WeRelate Crowdsourcing Challenge


The Challenge is intended to be a monthly feature, beginning on or around the 1st of each month and ending at the end of the month.

Thanks for playing. Good luck!


Contents

Current Challenges

Here are the current challenges for this month and last month.


This Month: August

August is known as American Art Appreciation Month. But I thought we would extend the borders of this month's Challenge to celebrate the interesting lives and creative artistic accomplishments of two international artists that have made me look at art in a new light and inspired me to wonder at their own inspiration for such unique works.

Gustav Klimt was an Austrian symbolist painter and one of the most prominent members of the Vienna Secession movement. He is noted for his paintings, murals, sketches, and other objets d'art. He is still remembered as one of the greatest decorative painters of the 20th century, while also producing one of the century's most significant bodies of erotic art. Although known to be extremely discrete about his personal life, he apparently led a fascinating life away from his art. See if you can find glimpses and details of that private life. He died 100 years ago.

Widely regarded as the most influential Mexican artist of the twentieth century, Diego Rivera was truly a larger-than-life figure who spent significant periods of his career in Europe and the U.S., in addition to his native Mexico. His large frescoes helped establish the Mexican mural movement in Mexican art. Between 1922 and 1953, Rivera painted murals in Mexico City, Chapingo, Cuernavaca, San Francisco, Detroit, and New York City. In 1931, a retrospective exhibition of his works was held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Rivera had a volatile relationship with a fellow Mexican artist, which was reproduced and represented in many forms in his own art. He died 60 years ago.

You can join this month's challenge and help bring the WeRelate pages related to these two well known international artists to life.


Last Month: July

On July 14, 1868, the design of a spring measuring tape in a circular case was patented by a man named, Alvin Fellows of New Haven, Connecticut. Although this was the first United States patent for a spring tape measure, Fellows’ patent was actually an improvement to an earlier design. The invention was originally patented in Sheffield, England by a man named James Chesterman in 1829.

Chesterman was in the business of making “flat wire” for the fashion industry. Dressmakers used loops of it to hold the shape of the crinoline hoop skirts that were trending at the time. A fluffed-out, layered hoop skirt could use as much as 180 feet of the wire. Chesterman had developed a heat-treating process that made the flat wire stronger and easier to produce in continuous, unbroken lengths. But as fashion trends change, the hoop skirts were soon out of style, which left the Chesterman with a large surplus of metal tape. Chesterman decided to put graduated marks on very long steel tapes so he could market them to surveyors as a lightweight “Steel Band Measuring Chain.” In contrast to heavy, bulky surveyors’ chains, he said that his product “has equal strength, greater correctness, is easier to clean, and to coil and uncoil, and is very much lighter and more compact.” Lightweight or not, Chesterman’s tapes had a hefty price. They sold in the United States for $17 — about $300 in today’s money.

Fellows’ improvement to it was a new way to attach the spring clip, allowing the tape to be locked in any position until the clip was released. Because it was expensive, this type of measuring tape did not immediately replace folding wooden rulers but it was the basis for the locking steel tape measures used today. Even so, the click-spring, steel tape measure did not attain immediate widespread use. The carpenter's folding wooden ruler remained the most popular collapsible measuring device in the United States until at least the 1940s.

Congratulations to User:Sorghumgrass who made the most additions and changes to Alvin Fellows and related pages. User:Cos1776 was a diligent contender on those pages as well. Congratulations to User:Btomp who made the most additions and changes to the WeRelate pages associated with James Chesterman. User:Sorghumgrass followed closely with other substantial additions.

Challenge Details

Purpose, Objective & Goal

  • This challenge, primarily, is intended to be fun, educational and rewarding.
  • It is also designed to help users, participants and WeRelate members strengthen their research skills, enhance wiki-page proficiency, work toward data-entry mastery, and provide practical experience in validating and substantiating factual events with supporting sources in a collaborative, crowdsourcing environment.

How to Play the Game

  • Select the subject page or pages during the period of the challenge and add vital statistics, factual events, and historical data which is supported by reliable primary and secondary sources.
  • Whoever enters the most valid edits on the subject page(s) before the challenge is closed at the end of the month wins the challenge (as reviewed and approved by the program manager).
  • Save the page after each event post, fact update, or additional source inclusion.
  • Primary sources should be sought and used.
  • Keep in mind the basic WR guidelines about not entering any information about living people.
  • Ensure any images you add to the page(s) are in the public domain or meet acceptable exceptions to copyright laws.
  • Each challenge will end at midnight on the last day of each month.
  • Challenge winners will be determined by the contest manager.
  • Each winner will receive a special graphic badge added to their user page showing their research prowess.

Award Points

Challenge will be based on additions and edits of information, which will be awarded points for credit.

  • Contributors will receive one full point for each event addition or data edit on the page.
  • All genealogy event edits should be supported by valid sources recorded on the page for each event.
  • Each valid supporting source or bibliographical reference entered will also be given a full point.
  • Since the purpose of all genealogy is to expand family lines, challenge points will be granted for the addition of connected family members as well, such as identifying information and genealogical data for parents, spouse(s), and children not previously entered in WeRelate.

Examples of edits that will win points:

  • Reference to vital records such as birth, marriage and death certificates.
  • Census data linked to an online source.
  • Photos of the subject or source references.
  • Mention of the subject in a biography, history book or genealogy book.
  • Inclusion in a newspaper article.
  • Burial information and photos of a headstone.
  • Edits that correct an error or resolve a dispute of information gleaned from an earlier source may also receive a point at the discretion of the manager.
  • Finding and linking to subject's Wikipedia page or Wikidata reference. (Remember that Wikipedia and Wikidata are compiled "knowledge base" references, so should not be considered as primary sources.)

Past Subjects & Winners

Challenge Awards

  • A WINNER award badge will be posted on the user page of each challenge winner (with at least three creditable edits).
  • A PLAYER badge will be presented to other contenders who enter at least three approved edits on the subject page during the challenge period.
  • Subject pages not receiving at least three edits will be considered not to have a winner.