Place:Shropshire, England

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NameShropshire
Alt namesSALsource: Curious Fox: UK Counties and Shires [online] (2002).
Salopsource: Wikipedia
Sciropesciresource: Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names (1998)
Shropssource: Wikipedia
TypeHistoric county, Administrative county, Modern county
Coordinates52.683°N 2.65°W
Located inEngland
Contained Places
Civil parish
Clungunford
Neen-Savage
General region
Soudley
Hamlet
Neen-Savage
Pixley
Inhabited place
Abcott
Abdon
Ackleton
Acton Pigott
Acton Round
Acton Scott
Adderley
Adeney
Admaston
All Stretton
Alveley
Anchor
Astley
Aston on Clun
Atcham
Barrow
Baschurch
Battlefield
Bayston Hill
Bedstone
Benthall
Birtley
Bishop's Castle
Bomere Heath
Bridgnorth
Broome
Broseley
Buildwas
Burford
Chelmarsh
Cherrington
Church Stretton
Cleehill
Cleobury Mortimer
Clive
Clun
Clunbury
Clungunford
Clunton
Coalbrookdale
Coalport
Condover
Cosford
Craven Arms
Cressage
Cross Houses
Crudgington
Dawley
Ditton Priors
Dorrington
Edgmond
Ellesmere
Farlow
Fitz
Ford
Gobowen
Grinshill
Hadley
Hampton Loade
Harmer Hill
High Ercall
Highley
Hodnet
Horsehay
Ironbridge
Islington
Jackfield
Kinnerley
Kinton
Knockin
Knowbury
Knowle
Kynnersley
Lilleshall
Little Stretton
Little Wenlock
Llanymynech
Llynclys
Longden
Longdon-on-Tern
Longford
Loppington
Ludlow
Lydbury North
Lydham
Madeley
Market Drayton
Melverley
Minsterley
Much Wenlock
Myddle
Nantmawr
Nash
Nesscliffe
New Invention
Newcastle
Newport
Oakengates
Oakly Park
Oswestry
Padmore
Pontesbury
Prees
Priestweston
Purslow
Quabbs
Quatt
Ratlinghope
Rhydycroesau
Roden
Rodington
Ruyton-Eleven-Towns
Shawbury
Sheriff Hales
Shifnal
Shrewsbury ( 400 - )
Snailbeach
St Martin's
Stiperstones
Stokesay
Stottesdon
Sutton Maddock
Telford
Tenbury
Ternhill
Tibberton
Ticklerton
Tong
Uffington
Upper Battlefield
Upton Magna
Walford
Wellington
Welshampton
Wem
West Felton
Westbury
Weston Lullingfields
Weston Rhyn
Whitchurch
Whittington
Withington
Woore
Worthen
Wrockwardine
Wroxeter ( 0050 - )
Yorton
Manor
Neen-Sollars
Parish
Acton Burnell
Alberbury
Albrighton
Astley-Abbotts
Dawley-Magna
Donington
Hopesay
Linley
Oldbury
Quatford
Registration district
Whitchurch Registration District
Township
Rudge
Unknown
Albrighton (near Shrewsbury)
Annscroft
Ash
Ashford-Bowdler
Ashford-Carbonell
Asterley
Aston
Aston-Botterell
Aston-Eyre
Badger
Beckbury
Berrington
Betton-Strange
Bettws
Beveley
Bicton
Billingsley
Bitterley
Blackford
Bolas Magna
Bomor-Heath
Boningale
Boraston
Boreatton
Boscobel
Bourton
Brace-Meole
Brockton
Bromfield
Brompton and Rhiston
Brompton
Broughall
Broughton
Bucknell
Burton
Burwarton
Calverhall
Cardeston
Cardington
Castlewright
Cause
Caynham
Cefn-y-Blodwel
Chapel Lawn
Cheney Longville
Cheswardine
Chetton
Chetwynd
Chetwynd-Aston
Childs-Ercall
Chirbury
Chorley
Church-Aston
Claverley
Clee-St. Margaret
Cleobury North
Cockshutt
Cold-Weston
Colemere
Coreley
Coton
Cound
Criftins-by-Ellesmere
Cruckmeole
Culmington
Cwm Head
Dawley-Parva
Deuxhill
Diddlebury
Dodington
Donington-Wood
Dovaston
Dowles
Drayton-Parva
Duddleston
Eardington
East Hamlet
Easthope
Eaton-Constantine
Eaton-under-Heywood
Eaton-upon-Tern
Edgton
Edstaston
Ellerdine
Eyt
Eyton-upon-the-Wild-Moors
Fauls
Frankton
Frodesley
Gatten
Glazeley
Great Dawley
Great Hanwood
Great Ness
Greet (near Burford)
Greet
Grimpo
Habberley
Hadnall
Halford
Halston
Hanwood
Harley
Haughmond
Haughton
Heath
Hengoed
Hinstock
Holdgate
Hollinwood
Hope-Baggot
Hope-Bowdler
Hopton Bank
Hopton Castle
Hopton Crangeford
Hopton Wafers
Hordley
Horton
Hughley
Ightfield
Kemberton
Kenley
Ketley Bank
Ketley
Kinlet
Lawley
Leaton
Lee-Brockhurst
Leebotwood
Leighton
Lightmoor
Little Berwick
Little Ness
Llanvair-Waterdine
Llanyblodwell
Long Stanton
Longnor
Loughton
Lower Maesbrook
Ludford
Lydley-Hayes
Lyneal
Lyth Hill
Mainstone
Malinslee
Marton
Mawley-Hall
Middleton
Middleton-Priors
Middleton-Scriven
Milson
Mindtown
Monk-Hopton
Montford
More
Moreton
Moreton-Corbet
Moreton-Say
Morvill
Mossey Green
Mossfield
Mucclestone
Munslow
Nabb
Neenton
Nethercot
New Dale
Newtown
Norbury
Norton
Norton-in-Hales
Old Park
Onibury
Petton
Pitchford
Plealey
Plowdon
Posenhall
Pradoe
Preen-Church
Preesgweene
Preston-Brockhurst
Preston-Gubbals
Preston-on-the-Weald-Moors
Priors-Lee
Pulverbatch
Richards-Castle
Romsley
Rowton
Ruckley and Langley
Rushbury
Ruyton-of-the-Eleven-Towns
Ryton
Sambrook
Selattyn
Shavington
Sheinton
Shelton and Oxon
Shelve
Shipton
Shrawardine
Sibdon-Carwood
Sidbury
Silvington
Smethcott
Snedshill
Soughton
St. Alkmond
St. Chad
St. George
St. Julian
Stanton-Lacy
Stanton-upon-Hine-Heath
Stapleton
Stirchley
Stockton
Stoke-St. Milborough
Stoke-upon-Tern
Stottesden
Stowe
Sutton (near Shrewsbury)
Sutton
Tasley
Tetchill
Tilstock
Trefonen
Trench
Tugford
Uckington
Upper Maesbrook
Uppington
Upton-Cressett
Upton-Waters
Wattlesborough
Weirbrook
Wenlock
Wentnor
West Cotton
Westanswick
Westhope
Weston and Wixhill under Redcastle
Weston
Weston-Lullingfield
Weston-under-Redcastle
Wheathill
Whitton
Whixhall
Wigmore
Wilcott
Willey
Wistanstow
Wollaston
Wollerton
Wombridge
Woodcote
Woodhouse
Woodseaves
Woolstaston
Worfield
Wrockwardine-Wood
Yockleton
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Shropshire ( or ; alternatively Salop;[1] abbreviated, in print only, Shrops) is a county in the West Midlands of England. It borders Wales to the west, Cheshire to the north, Staffordshire to the east, Worcestershire to the south-east and Herefordshire to the south. Shropshire Council was created in 2009, a unitary authority taking over from the previous county council and five district councils. The borough of Telford and Wrekin has been a separate unitary authority since 1998 but continues to be included in the ceremonial county.

The county's population and economy is centred on five towns: the county town of Shrewsbury, which is culturally and historically important and is located in the centre of the county; Telford, a new town in the east which was constructed around a number of older towns, most notably Wellington, Dawley and Madeley, which is today the most populous; and Oswestry in the north-west, Bridgnorth just to the south of Telford, and Ludlow in the south. The county has many market towns, including Whitchurch in the north, Newport north-east of Telford and Market Drayton in the north-east of the county.

The Ironbridge Gorge area is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, covering Ironbridge, Coalbrookdale and a part of Madeley. There are, additionally, other notable historic industrial sites located around the county, such as at Shrewsbury, Broseley, Snailbeach and Highley as well as the Shropshire Union Canal.

The Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty covers about a quarter of the county, mainly in the south. Shropshire is one of England's most rural and sparsely populated counties, with a population density of 136/km2 (350/sq mi). The Wrekin is one of the most famous natural landmarks in the county, though the highest hills are the Clee Hills, Stiperstones and the Long Mynd. Wenlock Edge is another significant geographical and geological landmark. In the low-lying northwest of the county overlapping the border with Wales is the Fenn's, Whixall and Bettisfield Mosses National Nature Reserve, one of the most important and best preserved bogs in Britain. The River Severn, Great Britain's longest river, runs through the county, exiting into Worcestershire via the Severn Valley. Shropshire is landlocked and with an area of is England's largest inland county.

The county flower is the round-leaved sundew.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

The area was once part of the lands of the Cornovii, which consisted of the modern day counties of Cheshire, Shropshire, north Staffordshire, north Herefordshire and eastern parts of Powys. This was a tribal Celtic iron age kingdom. Their capital in pre-Roman times was probably a hill fort on The Wrekin. Ptolemy's 2nd century Geography names one of their towns as being Viroconium Cornoviorum (Wroxeter), which became their capital under Roman rule and one of the largest settlements in Britain. After the Roman occupation of Britain ended in the 5th century, the Shropshire area was in the eastern part of the Welsh Kingdom of Powys; known in Welsh poetry as the Paradise of Powys. It was annexed to the Angle kingdom of Mercia by King Offa in the eighth century, at which time he built two significant dykes there to defend his territory against the Welsh or at least demarcate it. In subsequent centuries, the area suffered repeated Danish invasion, and fortresses were built at Bridgnorth and Chirbury.

After the Norman Conquest in 1066, major estates in Shropshire were granted to Normans, including Roger de Montgomerie, who ordered significant constructions, particularly in Shrewsbury, the town of which he was Earl. Many defensive castles were built at this time across the county to defend against the Welsh and enable effective control of the region, including Ludlow Castle and Shrewsbury Castle. The western frontier with Wales was not finally determined until the 14th century. Also in this period, a number of religious foundations were formed, the county largely falling at this time under the diocese of Hereford and that of Coventry and Lichfield. Some parishes in the north-west of the county in later times fell under the diocese of St. Asaph until the disestablishment of the Church in Wales in 1920, when they were ceded to the Lichfield diocese.

The county was a central part of the Welsh Marches during the medieval period and was often embroiled in the power struggles between powerful Marcher Lords, the Earls of March and successive monarchs.

The county also contains a number of historically significant towns, including Shrewsbury, Ludlow and Oswestry. Additionally, the area around Coalbrookdale in the county is seen as highly significant, as it is regarded as one of the birthplaces of the Industrial Revolution. The village of Edgmond, near Newport, is the location of the lowest recorded temperature (in terms of weather) in England and Wales.[2]


Etymology

The origin of the name "Shropshire" is the Old English "Scrobbesbyrigscīr" (literally Shrewsbury -shire).

Salop is an old abbreviation for Shropshire, sometimes used on envelopes or telegrams, and comes from the Anglo-French "Salopesberia". It is normally replaced by the more contemporary "Shrops" although Shropshire residents are still referred to as "Salopians".[1] Salop however is also used as an alternative name for the county town, Shrewsbury, which also shares the motto of Floreat Salopia.

When a county council for the county was first established in 1889, it was called Salop County Council. Following the Local Government Act 1972, Salop became the official name of the county, but a campaign led by a local councillor, John Kenyon, succeeded in having both the county and council renamed as Shropshire in 1980. This took effect from 1 April of that year.

County extent

The border with Wales was defined in the 16th century – the hundreds of Oswestry (including Oswestry) and Pimhill (including Wem), and part of Chirbury had prior to the Laws in Wales Act formed various Lordships in the Welsh Marches.

The present day ceremonial county boundary is almost the same as the historic one. Notably there has been the removal of several exclaves and enclaves. The largest of the exclaves was Halesowen, which became part of Worcestershire in 1844 (now part of the West Midlands county), and the largest of the enclaves was Herefordshire's Farlow in South Shropshire, also transferred in 1844, to Shropshire. Alterations have been made on Shropshire's border with all neighbouring English counties over the centuries. Gains have been made to the south of Ludlow (from Herefordshire), to the north of Shifnal (from Staffordshire) and to the north (from Cheshire) and south (from Staffordshire) of Market Drayton. The county has lost land in two places – to Staffordshire and Worcestershire.

External Links

  1. GENUKI Shrophsire
  2. Shropshire Archives
  3. Shropshire FS Research Wiki


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Shropshire. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.