Place:Russia


NameRussia
Alt namesR.S.F.S.R.source: Encyclopedia Britannica Online (1994-2001) accessed 8/01
Rossijskaja Sovetskaja Federativnaja Socialističeskaja Respublikasource: Rand McNally Atlas (1986) I-180
Rossiyasource: Getty Vocabulary Program
Rossiyskayasource: Cambridge World Gazetteer (1990) p 547
Rossiyskaya Federatsiyasource: Wikipedia
Rossiyskaya SFSRsource: Times Atlas of the World (1988)
Rusiasource: Cassell's Spanish Dictionary (1978) p 526
Ruslandsource: Engels Woordenboek (1987) I, 620
Russian Federationsource: Wikipedia
Russian SFSRsource: Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1984)
Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republicsource: Encyclopedia Britannica Online (1994-2001) accessed 8/01; Times Atlas of World History (1993) p 354
Russiesource: Cassell's French Dictionary (1981) I, 663
Russlandsource: Cassell's German Dictionary (1982) p 504
Rússiasource: Rand McNally Atlas (1994) p 320
TypeCountry
Coordinates60°N 47°E
Contained Places
Unknown
Wesselowka
Country
Georgia (country) ( 1783 - 1918 )
Kazakhstan
Kurland ( 1795 - 1918 )
County
Kexholm ( 1721 - 1917 )
Kovna
District
Tbilisi ( 1801 - 1918 )
District & city
Kutaisi ( 1810 - 1991 )
Federal district
Dalnevostochny
Privolzhsky
Severo-zapadny
Sibirsky
Tsentralny ( 2000 - )
Uralsky
Yuzhny
General region
Outer Manchuria
Russian Far East
Sibir'
Geographic region
Kuban
Historic region
Kondia
Historical district
Khotin ( 1812 - 1918 )
Melitopol′
Historical general region
Soviet Far East
Historical province
Amur
Arkhangel'sk
Astrakhan
Baku ( 1813 - 1991 )
Bessarabia ( 1812 - 1917 )
Bessarabia ( 1711 - )
Chernigov
Dagestan
Ekaterinoslav
Elisavetpol'
Erivan
Estonia
Grodno
Irkutsk
Kaluga
Kamchatka
Kars
Kazan′
Khar′kov ( - 1932 )
Kherson
Kiev ( - 1991 )
Kostroma
Kovna
Kuban
Kurland ( 1795 - 1918 )
Kursk
Kutais
Livonia ( 1721 - 1917 )
Minsk ( - 1991 )
Mogilev
Moscow
Nizhny Novgorod
Novgorod
Olonet︠s︡
Orel
Orenburg
Penza
Perm
Podol′e
Poltava
Primor'e
Primorsky
Pskov
Ryazan
Saint Petersburg
Samara
Saratov
Simbirsk
Smolensk
Stavropol
Suvalki ( 1831 - )
Tambov
Tavrida ( 1783 - 1918 )
Terek
Tiflis ( 1801 - 1921 )
Tobol′sk
Tomsk
Tver
Ufa
Vil′na
Vitebsk
Vi︠a︡tka
Vladimir
Vologda
Volyn′ ( 1795 - 1939 )
Voronezh
Yaroslavl
Zabaĭkal'e
Zakataly
Historical region
Kavkaz
Outer Manchuria
Historical region/province
Tula
Historical territory
Don Cossacks
Kazakhstan
Inhabited place
Erivan
Khotin ( 1812 - 1918 )
Kisheuef
Włocławek ( - 1918 )
Łążyn
Krai
Kamchatka
Primorsky
Modern voivodship
Bydgoszcz ( 1815 - 1919 )
Oblast
Amur
Arkhangel'sk
Astrakhan
Irkutsk
Kaluga
Kherson
Kostroma
Kursk
Moscow
Nizhny Novgorod
Novgorod
Orel
Orenburg
Penza
Pskov
Ryazan
Samara
Saratov
Simbirsk
Smolensk
Tambov
Tomsk
Tula
Tver
Vi︠a︡tka
Vladimir
Vologda
Voronezh
Yaroslavl
People's republic voivodship
Bydgoszcz ( 1815 - 1919 )
Populated place
Skolki
Province
Elisavetpol'
Grodno
Kars
Region
Kavkaz
Republic
Dagestan
Kazan′
Territory
Stavropol
Unknown
Glazmanka (township)
Kiev
Ural Mountains
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Russia or, also officially known as the Russian Federation, is a country situated in northern Eurasia. It is a federal semi-presidential republic, comprising 83 federal subjects. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (both with Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia, and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk and the U.S. state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. At , Russia is the largest country in the world, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area. Russia is also the world's ninth most populous nation with 143 million people as of 2012. Extending across the entirety of northern Asia and much of Eastern Europe, Russia spans nine time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms.

The nation's history began with that of the East Slavs, who emerged as a recognizable group in Europe between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Founded and ruled by a Varangian warrior elite and their descendants, the medieval state of Rus arose in the 9th century. In 988 it adopted Orthodox Christianity from the Byzantine Empire,[1] beginning the synthesis of Byzantine and Slavic cultures that defined Russian culture for the next millennium. Rus' ultimately disintegrated into a number of smaller states; most of the Rus' lands were overrun by the Mongol invasion and became tributaries of the nomadic Golden Horde. The Grand Duchy of Moscow gradually reunified the surrounding Russian principalities, achieved independence from the Golden Horde, and came to dominate the cultural and political legacy of Kievan Rus'. By the 18th century, the nation had greatly expanded through conquest, annexation, and exploration to become the Russian Empire, which was the third largest empire in history, stretching from Poland in Europe to Alaska in North America.

Following the Russian Revolution, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic became the largest and leading constituent of the Soviet Union, the world's first constitutionally socialist state and a recognized superpower, which played a decisive role in the Allied victory in World War II. The Soviet era saw some of the most significant technological achievements of the 20th century, including the world's first spacecraft, and the first astronaut. The Russian Federation became the successor state of the Russian SFSR following the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, and is recognized as the continuing legal personality of the Union state.[2]

The Russian economy ranks as the eighth largest by nominal GDP and sixth largest by purchasing power parity.[3] Russia's extensive mineral and energy resources, the largest reserves in the world, have made it one of the largest producers of oil and natural gas globally.[4][5] The country is one of the five recognized nuclear weapons states and possesses the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction.[6] Russia is a great power and a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council, a member of the G8, G20, the Council of Europe, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation, the Eurasian Economic Community, the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), and the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and the leading member of the Commonwealth of Independent States.

Contents

How places in Russia are organized

In 1719 the Russian Empire was divided into 50 provinces, growing to just over 100 by World War I. These divisions are labeled "historical provinces". Today Russia is divided into seven "federal districts", which are further divided into 85 "federal subjects".

The standard at WeRelate is to title Russian place pages according to their historical province when it is known, with also-located-in links to the federal subject when it is known.

All places in Russia

Further information on historical place organization in Russia

Research Tips

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Russia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.