Place:Jefferson, Alabama, United States

NameJefferson
Alt namesJeffersonsource: Getty Vocabulary Program
TypeCounty
Coordinates33.583°N 86.867°W
Located inAlabama, United States     (1819 - )
See alsoWalker, Alabama, United StatesChild county (source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990)
Contained Places
Cemetery
Beth-El Cemetery
Forest Hill Cemetery
Moncrief Cemetery
Mount Calvary Cemetery ( 1830 - 2010 )
Census-designated place
Concord
Edgewater
McDonald Chapel
Minor
Rock Creek
Inhabited place
Acton
Adamsville
Alden
Alliance
Alton
Argo
Ayres
Bagley
Bartonville
Bay View
Belle Haven
Beltona
Belwood
Bessemer Junction
Bessemer
Bessie Junction
Bessie
Birmingham ( 1813 - )
Biscayne Highlands
Black Creek
Black Diamond
Blossburg
Blue Creek
Bluff Park
Bluff Ridge
Bon Air
Booker Heights
Boyles Highlands
Bradford
Breakstone Village
Brents Cross Roads
Brickyard Junction
Brighton
Brooklane Place
Brookside
Bullard Shoals
Bush
Cahaba Cove
Cahaba Crest
Cahaba Heights
Cahaba Village
Camp Oliver
Cane Creek
Cardiff
Center Point
Central Park Highlands
Chalkville
Chetopa
Clay
Coalburg
Coaldale
Collins
Columbus
Corner
Crest
Crestview Hills
Crockard Junction
Crocker Junction
Crosston
Crumley Chapel
Cunningham
Daisey City
Danville
Docena
Dogtown
Dolomite
Dolonar Junction
Dolonar
Driftwood
East Brighton
East Royles
East Thomas Gardens
East Trussville
Eastern Valley
Eden Ridge
Edgewater Junction
Edgewood
Ensley Junction
Exum
Ezra
Fairfield Village
Fairfield
Falls Junction
Fieldstown
Five Points South
Flat Creek
Flat Top
Flint Hill
Forest Acres
Forestdale by the Brook
Forestdale
Fox Trace
Franklin Gardens
Frenchtown
Fultondale
Gardendale
Garywood
Genery
Gilmore
Glendale
Grants Mill
Grayson Valley
Graysville Heights
Graysville
Greenleas Heights
Hayes Highland
Hickory Grove
High Point
Highland Crest
Hillview
Hoagtown
Hobson
Holiday Gardens
Homewood
Hooper City
Hoover
Hopkins
Hudson Grove
Hueytown
Humoro
Ingle Terrace
Interurban Heights
Irondale
Jefferson Park
Jet
Kilgore
Kimberly
Labuco
Laceys Chapel
Lakeview Park
Lakewood Hills
Lawsontown
Leeds
Liberty Highlands
Lindbergh
Linn Crossing
Linton
Lipscomb
Little Italy
Little Shoal
Littleton
Lola City
Loveless Park
Lovick
Lowetown
Majestic
Mars Hill
Masseyline
Maxine
Maytown
McCalla
McCombs
Media
Midfield
Mineral Springs
Minniesville
Mobile Junction
Moore Corner
Morris
Mount Olive
Mountain Brook
Mud Creek
Mulga
Muscoda
New Castle
New Town
New Village
North Johns
North Lake Park
Oak Grove
Oak Lawn
Oak Park
Old Jonesboro
Overton
Oxmoor
Palmerdale
Palos
Park Courts
Park Place
Parkwood Hills
Parkwood
Partridge Crossroads
Pauls Hill
Pawnee Heights
Petes Crossroads
Pine Crest
Pinkney City
Pinson
Plain View
Pleasant Grove
Pleasant Hill
Port Birmingham
Porter
Powhatan
Praco
Providence
Queenstown
Raimund
Red Hill Heights
Red Wine
Republic
Rice
Robbins Crossroads
Robinwood
Rockdale
Rocky Ridge Manor
Rocky Ridge
Roebuck Plaza
Rolling Ridge
Roosevelt Cairo Village
Roosevelt
Roper
Rose Hill
Russet Woods
Rutledge Springs
Sayre
Sayreton
Scarlet Town
Scott City
Scott Crest
Self Creek
Seloca
Shades Acres
Shades Cliff
Shades Run
Shady Brook
Shadyside
Shadywood
Shannon
Sherman Heights
Sherwood Hills
Short Creek
Sloss
Smithson
Snowtown
South Vestavia Hills
Starvacre Ford
Sueann
Summit Farm
Sunnyside
Sunset Mountain
Sylvan Springs
Tarrant Heights
Tarrant
The Drifttracks
Timbercrest
Toadvine
Trafford
Trussville Manor
Trussville
Tuxedo Heights
Union Grove
Upper Coalburg
Valhalla
Valley Creek
Vanns
Vestavia Hills
Village Creek Junction
Village Springs
Vines Mill
Virginia
Walnut Grove
Warrior
Watson
Weller
West Ensley
West Jefferson
West Sayre
Westfield
Westwood
Wheeling Crossroad
Whispering Oaks
Wilderness Garden
Williamsburg
Windover
Wine Ridge
Winetka
Woodward Junction
Woodward
Unknown
Crumly Chapel
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Jefferson County is the most populous county in the U.S. state of Alabama. Its county seat is Birmingham. As of the 2010 census, the population of Jefferson County was 658,466. Jefferson County is the principal and most populous county in the Birmingham metropolitan area.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Jefferson County was established on December 13, 1819, by the Alabama Legislature.[1] It was named in honor of Thomas Jefferson.[1] The county is located in the north-central portion of the state, on the southmost edge of the Appalachian Mountains, in the center of the (former) iron, coal, and limestone mining belt of the Southern United States. Jefferson County is bordered by Blount County, Bibb County, St. Clair County, Shelby County, Tuscaloosa County, and Walker County, in Alabama. Jefferson County has a land area of about . Well-before Birmingham was even founded (in 1871), the county seat of Jefferson County was located at Carrollsville (1819 – 21) and Elyton (1821 – 73), and since 1873 it has been located in Birmingham, which was named for the English city of the same name in Warwickshire. That city had long been a center of iron and steel production in Great Britain. Note that Elyton has long been a part of Birmingham itself, since Birmingham was established by the merger of three towns, and the city has a long history of annexing its neighboring towns and villages, including North Birmingham.

Sewer construction and bond swap controversy

Two extremely controversial undertakings in the 2000s left the county in extreme debt, eventually leading to a 2011 bankruptcy. First was a massive overhaul of the county-owned sewer system, and second was a series of risky bond-swap agreements. Both have been scrutinized by federal prosecutors, with several former county officials convicted of bribery and corruption.[2]

A series of controversial interest rate swaps, initiated in 2002 and 2003 by former Commission President Larry Langford (removed as the mayor of Birmingham after his conviction), were intended to lower interest payments, but in fact, had the opposite effect, increasing the county's indebtedness to the point that a bankruptcy ensued. The bond swaps were at the center of an investigation by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission.

In late February 2008 Standard & Poor's lowered their rating of Jefferson County bonds to "junk" status. The likelihood of the county filing for Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection was then debated in the press. In early March 2008, Moody's followed suit and indicated that it would also review the county's ability to meet other bond obligations.

On March 7, 2008, Jefferson County failed to post $184 million collateral as required under its sewer bond agreements, thereby moving into technical default.

In February 2011, Lesley Curwen of the BBC World Service interviewed David Carrington, the newly appointed president of the county commission, about the risk of defaulting on bonds issued to finance “what could be the most expensive sewage system in history.” Carrington said there was “no doubt that people from Wall Street offered bribes” and “have to take a huge responsibility for what happened.” Wall Street investment banks including JP Morgan and others arranged complex financial deals using swaps. The fees and penalty charges increased the cost so the county in 2011 had $3.2 billion outstanding. Carrington said one of the problems was that elected officials had welcomed scheduling with very low early payments so long as peak payments occurred after they left office.

The SEC has awarded the county $75 million in compensation relation to “unlawful payments” against JP Morgan and in addition the company will forfeit $647 million of future fees.

2011 Bankruptcy filing

Jefferson County filed for bankruptcy on November 9, 2011. Valued at $4.2 billion, with debts of $3.14 billion relating to sewer work, this was at the time the most expensive municipal bankruptcy ever in the U.S., surpassed only by the Detroit bankruptcy filed in 2013. The County requested Chapter 9 relief under federal statute 11 U.S.C. §921. The case was filed in the Northern District of Alabama Bankruptcy Court as case number 11-05736.

, Jefferson County has slashed expenses and reduced employment of county government workers by more than 700.

Timeline

Date Event Source
1819 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1819 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1819 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1823 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1830 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1881 Birth records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1890 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1830 6,855
1840 7,131
1850 8,989
1860 11,746
1870 12,345
1880 23,272
1890 88,501
1900 140,420
1910 226,476
1920 310,054
1930 431,493
1940 459,930
1950 558,928
1960 634,864
1970 644,991
1980 671,324
1990 651,525

Research Tips

The Tannehill Iron Works (on Tannehill Parkway, Lat: 33.2487264, Long: -87.0694386) is included in the Ghost Town USA's Guide to the Ghost Towns of Alabama, hosted on RootsWeb.


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Jefferson County, Alabama. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.