Place:Hungary

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NameHungary
Alt namesHongarijesource: Engels Woordenboek (1987) p 336
Hongriesource: Cassell's French Dictionary (1981) p 246
HU00source: NIMA, GEOnet Names Server (1998-2000) accessed 01/20/99
Hungarian People's Republicsource: Cambridge World Gazetteer (1990) p 275-277
Hungriasource: Novo Dicionário Aurélio (1975) p 735
Hungríasource: Cassell's Spanish Dictionary (1978) p 817
Magyar Köztársaságsource: Britannica Book of the Year (1992) p 617; Britannica Book of the Year (1993) p 625
Magyar Köztársaságsource: Wikipedia
Magyar Népköztársaságsource: Britannica Book of the Year (1989) p 618
Magyarországsource: Getty Vocabulary Program
Magyarországsource: Wikipedia
Republic of Hungarysource: Wikipedia
Ungarnsource: Cassell's German Dictionary (1982) p 1111
Ungheriasource: Cassell's Italian Dictionary (1983) p 776
TypeNation
Coordinates47°N 20°E
Contained Places
County
Baranya
Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén
Bács-Kiskun
Békés
Csongrád
Fejér
Győr-Sopron
Hajdú-Bihar
Heves
Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok
Komárom-Esztergom
Nógrád
Pest
Somogy
Szabolcs-Szatmár
Tolna
Vas
Veszprém
Zala
Former county
Abauj-Torna ( - 1920 )
Alsó-Fehér ( 1867 - 1920 )
Arad ( - 1920 )
Baranya
Bars ( - 1920 )
Belovár-Körös ( - 1920 )
Bereg ( - 1920 )
Beszterce-Naszód ( 1867 - 1920 )
Bihar ( - 1920 )
Borsod ( - 1920 )
Brassó ( 1867 - 1920 )
Bács-Bodrog ( - 1920 )
Békés
Csanád ( - 1920 )
Csik ( 1867 - 1920 )
Csongrád
Esztergom ( - 1920 )
Fejér
Fogaras ( 1867 - 1920 )
Győr ( - 1920 )
Gömör-Kishont ( - 1910 )
Hajdu ( - 1920 )
Heves
Hont ( - 1920 )
Hunyad ( 1867 - 1920 )
Háromszék ( 1867 - 1920 )
Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok
Kis-Küküllő ( 1867 - 1920 )
Kolozs ( 1867 - 1920 )
Komárom ( - 1920 )
Krassó-Szörény ( - 1920 )
Külső-Szolnok ( - 1500 )
Lika-Korbava ( - 1920 )
Liptó ( - 1920 )
Maros-Torda ( 1867 - 1920 )
Modrus-Fiume ( - 1920 )
Moson ( - 1920 )
Máramaros ( 1876 - 1920 )
Nagy-Küküllő ( 1867 - 1920 )
Nyitra ( - 1920 )
Nógrád
Pest-Pilis-Solt-Kis-Kun ( 1876 - 1920 )
Pozsega ( - 1920 )
Pozsony ( - 1920 )
Somogy
Sopron ( - 1920 )
Szabolcs ( - 1918 )
Szatmár ( - 1920 )
Szeben ( 1867 - 1920 )
Szepes ( - 1920 )
Szerém ( - 1920 )
Szilágy ( 1876 - 1920 )
Szolnok-Doboka ( 1867 - 1920 )
Sáros ( - 1920 )
Temes ( - 1920 )
Tolna
Torda-Aranyos ( 1867 - 1920 )
Torontál ( - 1920 )
Trencsén ( - 1920 )
Turócz ( - 1920 )
Udvarhely ( 1867 - 1920 )
Ugocsa ( 1876 - 1920 )
Ung ( - 1920 )
Varasd ( - 1920 )
Vas
Verőcze ( - 1920 )
Veszprém
Zala
Zemplén ( - 1920 )
Zágráb ( - 1920 )
Zólyom ( - 1920 )
Árva ( - 1920 )
Former district
Fiume ( - 1920 )
Former province
Bácska ( - 1920 )
Horvát-Szlavonia ( - 1920 )
Szlovákia ( - 1920 )
Former region
Erdély ( 1867 - 1920 )
Inhabited place
Budapest
Hajdúsámson
Region
Dunántúl
Hortobágy
Kárpátalja ( - 1920 )
Transilvania ( 1867 - 1918 )
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Hungary is a landlocked country in Central Europe. It is situated in the Carpathian Basin and is bordered by Slovakia to the north, Ukraine and Romania to the east, Serbia and Croatia to the south, Slovenia to the southwest and Austria to the west. The country's capital and largest city is Budapest. Hungary is a member of the European Union, NATO, the OECD, the Visegrád Group, and the Schengen Agreement. The official language is Hungarian, which is the most widely spoken non-Indo-European language in Europe.

Following centuries of successive habitation by Celts, Romans, Huns, Slavs, Gepids, and Avars, the foundation of Hungary was laid in the late 9th century by the Hungarian grand prince Árpád in the Honfoglalás ("homeland-conquest"). His great-grandson Stephen I ascended to the throne in 1000 AD, converting the country to a Christian kingdom. By the 12th century, Hungary became a middle power within the Western world. Following the Battle of Mohács in 1526, Medieval Hungary collapsed and succumbed to 150 years of partial Ottoman occupation (1541–1699). Hungary eventually came under Habsburg rule, and later formed a significant part of the Austro–Hungarian Empire (1867–1918).

Hungary's current borders were first established by the Treaty of Trianon (1920) after World War I, when the country lost 71% of its territory, 58% of its population, and 32% of ethnic Hungarians. Following the interwar period, Hungary joined the Axis Powers in World War II, suffering significant damage and casualties. Hungary came under the influence of the Soviet Union, which contributed to the establishment of a four-decade long communist dictatorship (1947–1989). The country gained widespread international attention regarding the Revolution of 1956 and the seminal opening of its previously-restricted border with Austria in 1989, which accelerated the collapse of the Eastern Bloc.

On 23 October 1989, Hungary again became a democratic parliamentary republic, and is recognized today as a developed country. Hungary is a popular tourist destination attracting 10.2 million tourists a year (2011). It is home to the largest thermal water cave system and the second largest thermal lake in the world (Lake Hévíz), the largest lake in Central Europe (Lake Balaton), and the largest natural grasslands in Europe (the Hortobágy).

Contents

How places in Hungary are organized

Prior to World War I, Hungary was divided into 64 counties (according to Statoids) or 71 counties (according to Wikipedia). After World War I, the old counties were abolished and Hungary was divided into 19 counties. At WeRelate the pre-WWI counties are called "former counties" and the post-WWI counties are called "counties".

The standard at WeRelate is to title Hungarian place pages according to their former county when the former county is known, with also-located-in links to the modern county when it is known.

Map of counties of Kingdom of Hungary (Hungary proper and Croatia & Slavonia), 1886-1918
Enlarge
Map of counties of Kingdom of Hungary (Hungary proper and Croatia & Slavonia), 1886-1918
Counties of Kingdom of Hungary 1886-1918
Counties (Kingdom of Hungary) Abaúj-Torna · Alsó-Fehér · Arad · Árva · Bács-Bodrog · Baranya · Bars · Békés · Bereg · Beszterce-Naszód · Bihar · Borsod · Brassó · Csanád · Csík · Csongrád · Esztergom · Fejér · Fogaras · Gömör-Kishont · Győr · Hajdú · Háromszék · Heves · Hont · Hunyad · Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok · Kis-Küküllő · Kolozs · Komárom · Krassó-Szörény · Liptó · Máramaros · Maros-Torda · Moson · Nagy-Küküllő · Nógrád · Nyitra · Pest-Pilis-Solt-Kiskun · Pozsony · Sáros · Somogy · Sopron · Szabolcs · Szatmár · Szeben · Szepes · Szilágy · Szolnok-Doboka · Temes · Tolna · Torda-Aranyos · Torontál · Trencsén · Turóc · Udvarhely · Ugocsa · Ung · Vas · Veszprém · Zala · Zemplén · Zólyom
Corpus separatum Fiume (Rijeka)
Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia Bjelovar-Križevci · Lika-Krbava · Modruš-Rijeka · Požega · Srijem · Varaždin · Virovitica · Zagreb


Image:Österreich-Ungarns Ende.PNG

  • Map of ende Österreich-Ungarns, 1919
  • Line gray is: Border of Austria-Hungary in 1914
  • Line black is: Borders in 1914
  • Line red is: Borders in 1920

██ Empire of Austria in 1914

██ Kingdom of Hungary in 1914

██ Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1914


All places in Hungary

Further information on historical place organization in Hungary

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Hungary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.