Place:Down Ampney, Gloucestershire, England

NameDown Ampney
Alt namesAmpney-Downsource: Family History Library Catalog
Down-Ampneysource: Family History Library Catalog
Omeniesource: Domesday Book (1985) p 112
Coordinates51.683°N 1.85°W
Located inGloucestershire, England
See alsoCrownthorne and Minety (hundred), Gloucestershire, Englandhundred in which the parish was located
Cirencester Rural, Gloucestershire, Englandrural district in which it was situated 1894-1974
Cotswold (district), Gloucestershire, Englandmunicipal district of which it has been a part since 1974
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Down Ampney is a medium-sized village located in Cotswold district in Gloucestershire, in England.

It is off the A417 which runs between Cirencester and Faringdon (in Oxfordshire) on the A420, and about 5 km north of Cricklade, which is on the A419 which runs from Cirencester to Swindon, Wiltshire.

Down Ampney was notable in medieval times as one of the principal seats of the powerful Hungerford family (their principal seat was at Farleigh Hungerford, Somerset) and a number of elaborate family monuments survive in the village church.

The Old Vicarage in Down Ampney was the birthplace of Ralph Vaughan Williams in 1872. A tune he composed, used for the hymn "Come Down, O Love Divine", is titled "Down Ampney" in its honour.

During World War II, the airfield RAF Down Ampney saw action, with planes flying to and from the runway whilst serving in the war. The church has a stained glass window in commemoration of the planes that flew from the airfield for the Battle of Arnhem, 1944.

Aside from the airfield, a school older than 150 years, a multi-use games area for younger residents, a tennis club, a village hall, a small village shop, and the church mentioned above, which evidently dates back to before the bubonic plague, are also present in the current arrangement of the village.

Registration Districts

Research Tips

Online sources which may also be helpful:

  • GENUKI gives pointers to other archive sources as well as providing some details on each parish in the county. The emphasis here is on ecclesiastical parishes (useful before 1837)
  • A listing of all the Registration Districts in England and Wales since their introduction in 1837 and tables of the parishes that were part of each district and the time period covered with detailed notes on changes of parish name, mergers, etc. Do respect the copyright on this material.
  • The FamilySearch Wiki for Gloucestershire provides a similar but not identical series of webpages to that provided by GENUKI
  • A Vision of Britain through Time has a group of pages of statistical facts for almost every parish in the county
  • Unfortunately, A History of the County of Gloucester in the Victoria County History series provided by the website British History Online does not cover this part of the county
  • has recently added Gloucestershire Burials, 1813-1988; Confirmations, 1834-1913; Baptisms, 1813-1913; Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1813; and Marriages and Banns, 1754-1938. (entry dated 1 Aug 2015)
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