Place:County Tipperary, Republic of Ireland

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NameCounty Tipperary
Alt namesCo. Tipperary
Contae Thiobraid Árannsource: Wikipedia
County Tipperarysource: Blue Guide: Ireland (1979); USBGN: Ireland (1950)
Thiobrad Árannsource: Cambridge World Gazetteer (1990) p 649
Tiobraid Árannsource: Encyclopedia Britannica Online (2002-) "Tipperary." accessed 21 Oct. 2003
Tipperarysource: Getty Vocabulary Program
TypeFormer county
Located inRepublic of Ireland
Also located inIreland     ( - 1898)
See alsoNorth Tipperary, Republic of Irelandnew covering northern part of Tipperary established 1898
South Tipperary, Republic of Irelandnew covering souther part of Tipperary established 1898
Contained Places
Unknown
Dundrum
Inhabited place
Ahenny
Ardcrony
Ballagh
Ballingarry
Ballyporeen
Bansha
Borrisokane
Borrisoleigh
Cahir
Carrick-on-Suir
Carrigahorig
Cashel
Castletownarra
Clogheen
Cloghjordan
Clonmel
Cloughjordan
Fethard
Golden
Holycross
Killenaule
Lorrha
Mullinahone
Nenagh
Newcastle
Newinn
Newport
Roscrea
Silvermines
Swiss cottage
Templemore
Thurles
Tipperary
Toomyvara
Unknown
Aghacrew
Aghnameadle
Aglishcloghane
Ardfinnan
Ardmayle
Athassel and Relickmurry
Athnid
Ballingarry (Slievardagh Barony)
Ballintemple
Ballybacon
Ballycahill
Ballyclerahan
Ballygibbon
Ballygriffin
Ballymackey
Ballymurreen
Ballynaclogh
Ballysheehan
Baptistgrange
Barnane-ely
Barrettsgrange
Borrisnafarney
Bourney
Boytonrath
Brickendown
Bruis
Buolick
Burgesbeg
Carrick
Clogher
Cloghprior
Clonbeg
Clonbulloge
Cloneen
Clonoulty
Clonpet
Colman
Cooleagh
Coolmundry
Corbally
Cordangan
Corroge
Crohane
Cullen
Dangandargan
Derrygrath
Dogstown
Dolla
Donaghmore
Donohill
Dorrha
Drangan
Drom
Dromineer
Emly
Erry
Fennor
Fertiana
Finnoe
Gaile
Galbooly
Garrangibbon
Glenbane
Glenkeen
Grangemockler
Graystown
Horeabbey
Inch
Inishlounaght
Isertkieran
Kilbarron
Kilbragh
Kilcash
Kilclonagh
Kilcomenty
Kilconnell
Kilcooly
Kilcornan
Kilfeakle
Kilfithmone
Kilgrant
Kilkeary
Killardry
Killavinoge
Killea
Killeenasteena
Killodiernan
Killoscully
Killoskehan
Kilmastulla
Kilmore (Barony of Kilnamanagh Lower)
Kilmore (Barony of Ormond Upper)
Kilmucklin
Kilmurry
Kilnaneave
Kilnarath
Kilpatrick
Kilruane
Kilshane
Kilsheelan
Kiltegan
Kiltinan
Kilvellane
Kilvemnon
Knigh
Knockgraffon
Latteragh
Lattin
Lickfinn
Lisbunny
Lismalin
Lisronagh
Loughkeen
Loughmoe East
Loughmoe West
Magorban
Magowry
Modeshil
Modreeny
Molough
Monsea
Mora
Mortlestown
Mowney
Moyaliff
Moycarky
Moyne
Neddans
Newchapel
Newtownlennan
Oughterleague
Outeragh
Peppardstown
Rahelty
Railstown
Rathcool
Rathkennan
Rathlynin
Rathnaveoge
Rathronan
Redcity
Rochestown
Shanrahan
Shronell
Shyane
Solloghodbeg
Solloghodmore
St. Johnbaptist
St. Johnstown
St. Patricksrock
Temple-etney
Templeachally
Templebeg
Templederry
Templedowney
Templemichael
Templence
Templeneiry
Templenoe
Templeree
Templetenny
Templetouhy
Terryglass
Toem
Tubbrid
Tullaghmelan
Tullaghorton
Tullamain
Twomileborris
Upperchurch
Uskane
Whitechurch
Youghalarra
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

County Tipperary is a county in Ireland. For Irish local government, it is divided into two counties, North Tipperary and South Tipperary. The Local Government Bill 2013 proposes to reunite the two counties into one, with effect from the 2014 local elections. It is located in province of Munster. The North, whose county council is based in Nenagh, is in the Mid-West Region; while the South, whose county council is based in Clonmel, in the South-East Region. The county is named after the town of Tipperary, and was established in the early thirteenth century, shortly after the Norman invasion of Ireland. The population of the entire county was 158,754 at the 2011 census.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Tipperary was a county by 1210, when the sheriffdom of Munster shired after the Norman invasion of Ireland was split into separate shires of Tipperary and Limerick. In 1328, Tipperary was granted to the Earls of Ormond as a county palatine or liberty.[1] The grant excluded churchlands, including the archiepiscopal seat of Cashel, which formed the separate county of Cross Tipperary.[1] Though the Earls gained jurisdiction over the churchlands in 1662, "Tipperary and Cross Tipperary" were not definitively united until the County Palatine of Tipperary Act 1715, when the 2nd Duke of Ormond was attainted for supporting the Jacobite rising of 1715.

The county was divided once again in 1838. The county town of Clonmel, where the grand jury held its twice-yearly assizes, is at the southern limit of the county, and roads leading north were poor, making the journey inconvenient for jurors resident there.[2] A petition to move the county town to a more central location was opposed by the MP for Clonmel, so instead the county was split into two "ridings"; the grand jury of the South Riding continued to meet in Clonmel, while that of the North Riding met in Nenagh.[2] When the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898 established county councils to replace the grand jury for civil functions, the ridings became separate "administrative counties" with separate county councils.[2] Their names were changed from "Tipperary North/South Riding" to "North/South Tipperary" by the Local Government Act 2001, which redesignated all "administrative counties" as simply "counties". The Local Government Bill 2013 proposes to amalgamate the two counties and restore a single county of Tipperary.

Notable people

For more information, see the EN Wikipedia article County Tipperary. especially the section "Geography and political subdivisions" and its subsections "Baronies", "Civil parishes and townlands", and "Towns and villages"

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at County Tipperary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.