Place:Carshalton, Surrey, England

Watchers
NameCarshalton
TypeDistrict
Located inSurrey, England
Also located inGreater London, England    
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Carshalton ( is a suburban area of the London Borough of Sutton, England. Part of Surrey until 1965, it is located 10 miles (16.1 km) south-southwest of Charing Cross, situated in the valley of the River Wandle, one of the sources of which is Carshalton Ponds in the centre of the village. The combined population of the five wards comprising Carshalton was 45,525 at the 2001 census. Sutton is centred west of the town centre of Carshalton.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

To the south of the area now known as Carshalton, remains of artefacts dating from the Neolithic to the Iron Age have been found, suggesting that this was an early place of habitation. Prior to the Norman Conquest it is recorded that there were five manors in this location owned by five freemen.

The village lay within the Anglo-Saxon administrative division of Wallington hundred.

Carshalton appears in Domesday Book as Aultone. It was held by Goisfrid (Geoffrey) de Mandeville. Its domesday assets were: 3½ hides; 1 church, 10 ploughs, 1 mill worth £1 15s 0d, of meadow, woodland worth 2 hogs. It rendered £15 10s 0d.

Carshalton was known for its springs; these may have given the place its name Cars - Aul - ton. Aul means well or spring. A ton is a farm which was in some way enclosed. The meaning of the Cars element is uncertain but early spellings (Kersaulton and Cresaulton) may indicate connection with a cross or perhaps cress, watercress having been grown locally.

In his book History of the Worthies of England, the 17th century historian Thomas Fuller refers to Carshalton for its walnuts and trout.

Land was primarily put to arable use and the river Wandle gave rise to manufacturing using water power. A water mill to grind corn was mentioned in the Domesday Book. By the end of the 18th century it was recorded that there were several mills for the production of paper and parchment, leather, snuff, log-wood and seed oil. There were also bleaching grounds for calico.[1][2] During the Victorian era and into the early 20th century, Carshalton was known for its lavender fields (also see below under "Landmarks"), but the increasing land demand for residential building put an end to commercial growing.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission lists 78 civilian casualties in Carshalton during World War II.

From 1894 to 1965 Carshalton formed part of the Carshalton Urban District.

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