Place:Bexleyheath, Kent, England

Watchers
NameBexleyheath
Alt namesBexley-Heathsource: Family History Library Catalog
TypeCivil parish
Coordinates51.462°N 0.139°E
Located inKent, England     ( - 1965)
See alsoBexley, Kent, Englandurban district and municipal borough of which it was part
Bexley (London Borough), Greater London, EnglandLondon Borough into which it was absorbed in 1965
source: Family History Library Catalog
the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Bexleyheath is a suburban district of south-east London, England, located since 1965 in the London Borough of Bexley. Bexleyheath is in Outer London (i.e., it was not in London until 1965) and is 12 miles (19.3 km) east-southeast of Charing Cross (the measurement point for London locations).

History

Until the early 19th century, Bexley Heath comprised an area of scrub-land with few buildings, although Bexley Heath windmill stood at the corner of what is today Erith Road and Mayplace Road. The heath bordered Watling Street. In 1766 Sir John Boyd had Danson House built in parkland (now Danson Park between Bexleyheath and Welling). In 1814 the land to the north of Bexley that would become Bexleyheath became subject to an Enclosure Act. In 1859 architect Philip Webb designed Red House for the artist, reforming designer and socialist William Morris on the western edge of the heath, in the hamlet of Upton-—before Upton became largely developed as a London suburb. The National Trust acquired the house in 2003. Morris wanted to have a "Palace of Art" in which he and his friends could enjoy producing works of art. The house is of red brick with a steep tiled roof and an emphasis on natural materials. Red House is in a non-historical, brick-and-tile domestic style. It is now a Grade I listed building. Morris lived with his wife Jane in the house for five years, during which time their two daughters, Jenny and May, were born. Forced to sell the house for financial reasons in 1865, Morris vowed never to return to it-—he said that to see the house again would be more than he could bear.

Bexleyheath's parish church, Christ Church, dates from 1841; and the parish of Bexleyheath from 1866; the building of the current church finished in 1877. Alfred Bean, railway-engineer and one-time owner of Danson House, furthered the development of Bexleyheath as a London suburb by championing the Bexleyheath [railway] Line in the 1880s to support the growth of estates around Danson Park. The clock-tower at the centre of the modern shopping area, built in 1912, commemorates the coronation of King George V. In the late 1970s the London Borough of Bexley built its headquarters, the Civic Offices, in Bexleyheath.

Bexleyheath was part of Bexley Municipal Borough. (Source:A Vision of Britain through Time)

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