Person:Richard Mather (1)

m. 14 Sep 1591
  1. Rev. Richard Mather1596 - 1669
  2. Margaret Mather1598 -
  3. Ellin Mather1598 -
  4. Elizabeth Mather1618 - 1690
m. 29 Sep 1624
  1. Rev. Samuel Mather1626 - 1671
  2. Timothy Matherest 1628 - 1684/85
  3. Rev. Nathaniel Mather1630 - 1697
  4. Joseph Matherest 1632 -
  5. Rev. Eleazer Mather1637 - 1669
  6. Rev. Dr. Increase Mather1639 - 1723
m. 26 Aug 1656
Facts and Events
Name[3] Rev. Richard Mather
Gender Male
Birth[3][5] cal 1596 Lowton, Lancashire, England
Education[3] 1618 Brasenose College, Oxford.
Occupation[5] bet 1618 and 1633 Lancashire, EnglandMinister at Toxteth and Prescott
Marriage 29 Sep 1624 Bury, Lancashire, Englandto Katherine Holt
Emigration[3] 1635 On the James of Bristol.
Residence[3] 1635 Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States
Residence[3] 1636 Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States
Occupation[5] bet 1636 and 1669 Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United StatesMinister at Dorchester
Marriage 26 Aug 1656 Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United Statesto Sarah Hawkredd
Will[3] 16 Oct 1661
Will[3] 21 Sep 1664 Codicil.
Death[3][5] 22 Apr 1669 Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States
Probate[3] 24 May 1669 Will proved.
Burial[6] Dorchester North Burying Ground, Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Richard Mather (1596 – 22 April 1669), was a Puritan clergyman in colonial Boston, Massachusetts. He was father to Increase Mather and grandfather to Cotton Mather, both celebrated Boston divines.


The son of Thomas Mather and Margarite Abrams of Lowton, England, Richard was fortunate enough to go to grammar school at his parents insistence, even though he didn't think so at the time. His education was harsh and included daily beatings by the school master. In spite of that he developed a love of learning and became largely self educated after grammar school, a fact that set him apart from his peers. Upon completing his course of study at age 15, he took a position as school teacher in Toxteth. After 3 years of teaching he started studying at Oxford, but dropped out to take a position as a preacher at Toxteth. At this time in England, the Anglican church was the absolute governing authority, and preachers were expected to conform in every way. The puritan ethic was beginning to take hold, however, and Richard embraced it. Desiring not to engage in the puritan "sin of conformity" Richard refused to wear the "Surplice", a papal robe. For 15 years he preached as he saw fit, until he was finally silenced in 1633 by the ecclesiastical authorities for "non-conformity". He was briefly reinstated, then silenced again, permanently, in 1634. At this time he decided to bring his young family to New England.

The journey took a total of six weeks, three of which were spent at sea. Richard kept a log of the journey in which he describes the hardships and storms at sea which they endured to get here. Less than a week after his arrival on August 17, 1636, he accepted the ministry of the North Church in Dorchester, MA and remained there for 50 years. Upon their arrival, Richard and Katherine were given more than 100 acres of land in Dorchester to support themselves and their family. Katherine managed the household, making the decisions about hiring farmhands, buying and selling cattle, and the planting and harvesting, as well as schooling the children, although Richard took over the children's education once they had learned to read. It was customary for boys to leave home at an early age in those days. Thus, four of Richard's five sons went to board at Harvard between the ages of 12 and 16. Timothy was apprenticed out as a farmer. The religious battle Richard waged was as much a political war as a revolution in belief. He wrote four books & sent them to London to be published in an effort to explain and recommend the Congregation form of church. Two of his sons moved back to England to continue the effort there.

http://www.matherclan.com/trees/getperson.php?personID=I40&tree=Mather

References
  1.   Richard Mather, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2.   Mather, Richard, in American National Biography Online.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 Richard Mather, in Anderson, Robert Charles; George F. Sanborn; and Melinde Lutz Sanborn. The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635. (NEHGS, 1999-2011), 5:84-90.

    ORIGIN: Much Woolton, Lancashire [Mather Life 52 (50 - "After his Marriage, he removed his Habitation three miles from Toxteth, to Much-Woolton, having there purchased a House of his own …"]
    MIGRATION: 1635 on the James of Bristol [Young's First Planters 447-81].
    OCCUPATION: Minister. For many years Richard Mather was paid £100 a year for serving as Dorchester minister {DTR 63, 69, 89, 93, 98, 99, 102, 103, 108, 109]. Beginning in 1662, from which date he shared the Dorchester ministerial duties with William Stoughton, Mather received diminished compensation, with the annual salary for the last few years of his live settling at £80 [DTR 112, 116, 123, 128, 136, 145, 155, 162, 163].
    CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: On 25 October 1635, "Richard Mather and Katherine his wife" were admitted to Boston church (BChR 19]. On 23 August 1636, after the first church organized at Dorchester had removed to Windsor, a second church was organized, with Richard Mather as minister. Among the founders of this church, "Katharin Mather" was second in the list of women members [DChR 1-2].
    EDUCATION: Admitted to Brasenose College, Oxford, 9 May 1618, but did not take a degree [Foster 3:987; Morison 388-89].
    BIRTH: About 1596 (aged 22 at admission to Oxford on 9 May 1618 [Foster 3:987]; d. 22 April 1669 in "the 73 year of his age" [DVR 27]), son of Thomas and Margaret (Abraham) Mather of Lowton, Lancashire [Magnalia 444; NEHGR 54:348-49].
    DEATH: Dorchester 22 April 1669 ("Mr. Richard Mather, the Reverend Teacher of the Church of Dorchester, departed this life, the 22d (Month 2) 1669, the 73 year of his age" [DVE 27; see also Hull 229]).

  4.   Savage, James. A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England: Showing Three Generations of Those Who Came Before May, 1692, on the Basis of Farmer's Register. (Boston: Little, Brown, and Co, 1860-1862), 3:174.

    Richard (Mather), Dorchester, s. of Thomas, b. 1596, of an ancient fam. as his gr.s. Cotton in Magn. III. c. 20, assures us, at Lowton, in the parish of Winwick, Lancash. was employ. in teach. a sch. some yrs. bef. going to the Univ. but at length, on 9 May 1618, was ent. of Brazen Nose Coll. Oxford, yet soon call. to Toxteth, where he had taught the sch. preach. his first sermon 30 Nov. of the same yr. There most faithful. he serv. 15 yrs. and was then suspend. for non-conform. and feeling the true sense of his office, resolved on expatriat. In disguise he emb. at Bristol in the James, arr. 17 Aug. 1635, aft. peril in the remarka. storm two days bef. and on 25 Oct. with w. Catharine join. the ch. of Boston. He had m. 29 Sept. 1624, that d. of Edmund Holt, Esquire, of Bury, in Lancash. had Samuel, b. 13 May 1626, H. C. 1643; Timothy; Nathaniel, 20 Mar. 1630, H. C. 1647, bef. ment.; and Joseph, wh. d. in childhood; aft. com. to N. E. had Eleazer, 13 May 1637, H. C. 1656; and Increase, 21 June 1639, H. C. 1656, bef. ment. He was a man of excel. discretion, of less learning, it is prob. than his ambitious s. Increase, and less brilliancy, it is clear, than his eccentr. gr.s. the never dying author of Magnalia, but in true serv. as min. happier than either, and better than both. He was sett. at D. 23 Aug. 1636; his w. d. 1655, and he m. 26 Aug. 1656, Sarah, wid. of his great friend John Cotton, and d. 22 Apr. 1669. A few days bef. he had met a great indignity, in being refus. adm. with sundry others, sent by an ecclesiast. council, met at Boston, to attempt conciliat. in the first ch. there, as John Hull, one of the aggriev. mem. relates in his Diary, p. 229 of the Vol. pub. by the Antiq. Soc of Worcester. The wid. made her will 3 May 1670, but did not d. for six yrs. His life, written by Increase, print. 1670, is condensed in the Magn. the author of wh. could never be scrupulous in use of materials; and of course he shows that he had not resort. to the MS. of the journal of his gr.f. Yet the slight extracts from the interesting work, caused a desire for the orig. wh. in Young's Chron. was print. from the autogr. 210 yrs. aft. its date.

  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Richard Mather, in Weis, Frederick Lewis. The Colonial Clergy and the Colonial Churches of New England. (Lancaster, Massachusetts: The Society of the Descendants of the Colonial Clergy, 1936), 136.

    Richard Mather, b. Lowton, Winwick, Lancashire, England, 1596, son of Thomas and Margaret Mather; Brazenose Coll., Oxford, matric. May 6, 1618; Ord. Toxteth, Co. Lancaster, 1618; Toxteth and Prescott, Lancashire, 1618-1633; suspended 1633, for non-conformity; came to N. E. 1635; inst. Dorchester, Aug. 23, 1636; sett. Dorchester, 1636-1669; published the Bay Psalm Book and other works; Artillery Election Sermon, 1656; Election Sermons, 1660, 1664; his portrait is owned by the American Antiquarian Soc.; d. Dorchester, Apr. 22, 1669.

  6. Rev Richard Mather, in Find A Grave.
The James of Bristol (1635)
At least three ships called the James sailed in 1635 from England to New England. This one sailed with the Angel Gabriel and three smaller ships, the Bess, the Diligent, and the Mary. The James and the Angel Gabriel were caught in a great storm off the coast of North America. The Angel Gabriel wrecked off the coast of Maine, the James survived barely, making it to Boston after more than 12 weeks at sea.
Sailed: 4 June 1635 from King's Road, Bristol, England under Master John Taylor
Arrived: 17 Aug 1635 at Boston, Massachusetts.

Passengers:
at least 28
Thomas Armitage and family - Barnabas and Dina Fawer - George and Jane Kendrick - Richard Mather and family - Rev. Daniel Maude - Matthew Mitchell and family - John Smith and family - Nathaniel Wales

Resources: Richard Mather's Journal - Passenger List


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Richard Mather. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.