Person:Hugh Torbett (2)

Find records: birth marriage death
Hugh Torbett, of Chester County, PA and Pine Run, Augusta County, VA
m. ABT 1720
  1. John Torbett1721 - ABT 1763
  2. Robert Torbett1724 - 1795
  3. Hugh Torbett, of Chester County, PA and Pine Run, Augusta County, VA1730 - 1802
  4. Jane Torbett1734 -
  5. Elsie Torbett1736 - 1763
  6. Catherine Torbett1739 - 1763
  7. Margaret Torbett1740 -
  8. Allen Torbett1741 -
  9. David Torbett1742 -
  10. Elizabeth Torbett1743 - 1763
  11. Jannet TarbetABT 1748 - AFT 1763
  12. Nathaniel Torbett1779 -
  • HHugh Torbett, of Chester County, PA and Pine Run, Augusta County, VA1730 - 1802
  • WJane "Jenny" McEwenABT 1735 - 1828
m. Abt. 1763
  1. Samuel Torbett1764 - 1843
  2. Hugh Torbet1767 - 1829
  3. David TorbettABT 1770 -
  4. John Torbett1775 - 1849
  5. Easter Torbet1777 -
  6. Nathaniel Torbett1779 -
  7. Mary Torbett1785 -
Facts and Events
Name Hugh Torbett, of Chester County, PA and Pine Run, Augusta County, VA
Gender Male
Birth? 1730 Chester County, Pennsylvania
Marriage Abt. 1763 Chester County, Pennsylvaniato Jane "Jenny" McEwen
Death? Apr 1802 Greenville, Augusta County, Virginia

Hugh Torbet, Jr. was one of the Early Settlers of Old Chester County, Pennsylvania and an Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

Contents

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Old Augusta

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Beverley Manor
Borden's Grant
Register
Data
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Index

……………………..The Tapestry
Families Old Chester OldAugusta Germanna
New River SWVP Cumberland Carolina Cradle
The Smokies Old Kentucky

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Early Land Acquisition in Augusta County, VA

Land Survey in Augusta County, Virginia:


  • Page 203 - Hugh Tarbut, 400 acres, South River. Adjoining William Camble [Gamble], Beverley patent. October 24, 1772. [Abstract of Land Grant Surveys, 1761-1791, Augusta & Rockingham Counties, Virginia, by Peter Cline Kaylor, pg. 73]. (Note: this tract was located on "Pine Run" a stream that was a tributary of the South River, that was just outside of the Beverley Patent on its south-west end, likely adjoining a portion of Patrick Campbell's original 1,546-acre patent).

Estate Administration Record of Hugh Torbett in Augusta County, VA

  • 27th April, 1802--Saml. and Jno. Torbet, administrators of Hugh Torbet.


Records of Hugh Torbet in Chester County, PA

From Proprietary tax lists of the county of Chester, PA, by William Henry Egle, pg. 36:

Chester County Tax Rates, 1765: Hugh Torbet, Jr., 70 acres, 2 Horses, 2 Cattle, 0 Sheep, 0 Servants.


Records of Hugh Torbett in Augusta County, VA

  • Vol. 2 - Torbett vs. Torbett--O. S. 29; N. S. 10--Augusta. Hugh and Robert Torbett were brothers. Samuel Torbett was son of Hugh. Anthony Black married Hugh Torbett's daughter.
  • Vol. 2 - Torbett's heirs vs. Campbell--O. S. 47; N. S. 16. Bond 18th November, 1771, by Wm. Campbell and John Tate to Hugh Torbet, of Chester County, and Alexander Mitchel, of Pennsylvania, Lancaster County. Answer of Sarah Buchanan Preston, 1805, that she is only child now living of Wm. Campbell, deceased. She married Francis Preston. Her father died August, 1781. Defendants are, viz: Arthur Campbell, surviving executor of Margaret Campbell and Francis Preston; and Sarah, his wife, late Campbell, heiress of Wm. Campbell, deceased. Plaintiffs are, viz: Saml. Torbett, Anthony Black and Catharine, his wife, late Torbett; Hugh and David Torbett, Andrew Lockridge and Easter, his wife, late Torbett; Jane and Nathaniel Torbett, Mary Torbet, an infant, heirs-at-law of Hugh Torbett, deceased. Bill says: Charles Campbell died 1767 testate, leaving wife Margaret (father and mother of Gen. Wm. Campbell). Margaret died about November, 1777. Genl. Wm. Campbell died about 1782, leaving only one child Sarah, since married to Francis Preston. Thomas Tate married one of the daughters of Margaret Campbell, deceased. Arthur Campbell says Genl. William died August, 1781. Charles Campbell died January, 1767. Copy of Gen. William Campbell's will dated 28th September, 1780, proved in Washington County, 16th April, 1782. Wife Elizabeth, son Charles Henry, daughter Sarah Buchanan Campbell. Copy of Margaret Campbell's will dated 13th October, 1777, proved in Washington County 18th March, 1778. Son William; daughters Elizabeth Taylor, Jean Tate, Margaret Campbell, Ann Poston; son-in-law Arthur Campbell.
  • Vol. 2 - March, 1796 (A to C). - Buchanan vs. McCutchen.—Deed by Alexander Douglas to Andrew Duncan conveys a tract in Beverley Manor, 233 acres, joining Patrick Campbell's and Charles Campbell's and Brownlee's land, and a tract known as the Pine Run, where Francis Beatty once lived, 230 acres. Dated 16th October, 1746. Witnesses: Robert and John Cunningham.
Suit between Samuel Buchanan and Elizabeth, his wife; David Craig and Mary, his wife; John Edmonson and Jennet, his wife; John McKinny and Jane, his wife; James Brownlee and Florence, his wife, vs. William McCutchen, John McCutchen and John McCutchen, Jr., heirs-at-law of Wm. McCutchen.—Spa. 23d July, 1791. Writ, redocketing, 27th September, 1793. Whereas, I, Andrew Duncan, of Lincoln County, have authorized and given to James Brownlee, Sr., of Augusta County, power of attorney to convey a tract of land on Pine Run, joining Hugh Torbet and William Brownlee and John Shields, which McCutchen claims by caveat from Andrew Duncan, heir by law. 25th May, 1785. Witnesses: Alexander Brownlee, Jr., and John Brownlee. James Brownlee and Florence Brownlee, heirs-at-law of Andrew Duncan, deceased; all the above wives were daughters of Andrew Duncan, deceased, who left also a son, Andrew. Andrew, Sr.'s widow was Jannet. Andrew, Jr., was dead, 1791, intestate. Widow Jannet married William McCutchen. Alexander Douglas bought the land from Francis Beatty. William McCutchen was dead, 1791, as also Jannet. Francis Beatty first improved the land. Francis Beatty, shortly after making his entry, went to Carolina. William McCutchen entered a caveat versus Beatty and obtained judgment in 1769 and a patent in 1773. William Alexander deposes that in 1766, November, he was with William McCutchen at Williamsburg, when William McCutchen told him he had put in a friendly caveat to save the land for Andrew Duncan's children.