Person:Mary Roberts (197)

Watchers
m. 20 Jun 1812
  1. Jonathan RobertsAbt 1814 -
  2. Mary Jane Roberts1815 - 1898
  3. Martha RobertsAbt 1816 -
  4. Samuel Roberts, Jr.Abt 1820 -
  5. Allen William Roberts1827 - 1905
  6. Thomas H Roberts1828 - 1893
  7. Asbury Fletcher Roberts1829 - 1916
m. 23 Mar 1836
  1. Samuel Roberts Sutton1838 - 1913
  2. Patience Emily Sutton1840 - 1919
  3. William Gardner Sutton1843 - 1876
  4. Henry Allen Sutton, M.D.1847 - 1931
Facts and Events
Name Mary Jane Roberts
Gender Female
Birth[2] 4 Aug 1815 Berkeley, Virginia (now West Virginia), United States
Residence[2] Abt 1820 Chillicothe, Ross, Ohio, United States
Residence[2] Abt 1831 Greene, Ohio, United Statescame to Greene County with parents
Marriage 23 Mar 1836 Greene, Ohio, United Statesby Rev. Brown of the Ohio conference
to Daniel B Sutton
Residence[2] Abt 1845 Jay, Indiana, United Statescame to Jay County with husband
Census[3] 1850 Richland, Jay, Indiana, United Statesage 34 - family lives on the south end of Mary's father's land
Census[4] 1860 Richland, Jay, Indiana, United Statesage 44 -
Census[5] 1870 Richland, Jay, Indiana, United Statesage 54 -
Census? 1880 Richland, Jay, Indiana, United Statesage 64 -
Death? 8 Aug 1898 Redkey, Jay, Indiana, United States
Burial? Mount Vernon Cemetery, Redkey, Jay, Indiana, United States
References
  1.   Jay, Milton T., and M.W. Montgomery. History of Jay County, Indiana: including its world war record and incorporating the Montgomery history. (Indianapolis: Historical Pub. Co., 1922)
    242.

    A Remniscence of Other Days. - As a sidelight on pioneer conditions with respect to church going a bit of reminiscence written by Mrs. Mary Sutton, wife of the Rev. Daniel B. Sutton, of Redkey, some years before her death in the summer of 1898, is particularly illuminating. "When we had weekday preaching we would lay by our work and attend without fail," Mrs. Sutton wrote: "It would often last all day and sometimes part of the night. In times of quarterly or two-days meeting we would take with us fifteen or twenty persons. We worshipped in log houses or cabins. The dear Savior was with us and we were happy. Our benches were made of split timber and no one thought strange of it. *** In our united effort to serve the Lord we sometimes traveled through muddy roads and deep waters." Mr. and Mrs. Sutton were married in Greene county, Ohio, in 1836 and in 1845 came to Jay county, which then, as Mrs. Sutton observed in her reminiscences, "was almost a wilderness. Mr. Sutton had to open the road before we could get to our intended home. We soon erected a small cabin with four window lights in one side and with a stick chimney. We at first used blankets for doors. *** A great many wild animals then infested this uncultivated country, such as wolves and deer and turkeys and wild hogs, and some of the more dangerous would often approach the houses. Some ladies were brave enough to shoot at them, to the great delight of the settlers. *** But notwithstanding we had our disadvantages, we also had our pleasures. There was a grand quality of sociability among the people. On one occasion we had a great number visiting our house. I jestingly said to Mr. Sutton, 'Please step out and kill a wild turkey for dinner.' He took his gun and went out where they ranged and killed three at one shot. At another time he killed two deer at one shot. *** Sometimes wagon loads of friends would go and assist some lady to quilt. The gentlemen would gather at the same place and assist in rolling logs and in clearing. They would have great enjoyment in each others' society and would partake of a fine dinner."

  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Lynch, Martha C. M. Reminiscences of Adams, Jay and Randolph Counties, Indiana. (Ft. Wayne, Indiana: Lipes, Nelson & Singmaster, 1897)
    181.

    "VINE COTTAGE, REDKEY, May 5th 1896 - Rev. D.B. Sutton, local elder in the M.E. church and one of the local pioneer ministers of Jay County, Indiana, was born March 18th, 1816, in Ohio, Green County. He is the youngest except one, of a family of ten children. All except him have gone to the great beyond or glory world. He received such education as the school privileges of that time and period offered. He was early converted at a camp meeting held in Green County, Ohio, sixty-five years ago. Through all these years that have intervened since that hour, he has never wavered in his faith not faltered in his duty. In the meantime his interest in the M.E. church began to attract attention, and his brethren recognizing his ability and integrity and seeing in him the requisite qualities of leaderhip, called him early to engage in public service. During his early days his parents moved to Green County, Ohio, where he resided till the date of his marriage, which was March 23, 1836, when he was united in holy matrimony to Miss Mary Roberts, by Rev. Brown, of the Ohio conference.

    She was born in Berkley County, Virginia, August 4th, 1815. She came with her parents early in life to Chillecothe, Ross County, Ohio. This was my earliest recollection of a home, my parents having settled there shortly after their marriage, where they established a home like the ancient Patriarch. They erected an altar from which each morning and evening ascended the inscene of prayer and praise. They also furnished a chamber for the prophets, and many of the toil worn preachers rested there. If any of those veterans are still livng they may perhaps remember my sainted mother and father, and recollect incidents of association with them. My ancestors were nearly all Methodists. I can recollect Father Finley, Father Collins and Mr. Bascom in his oratoral brilliancy. Those I heard proclaim a full and free salvation. When I was 16 my father moved to Green County, Ohio, where Mr. Sutton and I were united in marriage. The pleasant associations that we enjoyed while living in Green County have been the subject of grateful recollection, and it is with feelings of no ordinary character that I address these few lines. It recalls vividly to my mind many pleasant scenes.

    In 1845 we bid adieu to our home and all its hallowed associations, the friends of our youth. We came to Jay County, which was almost a wilderness. Mr. Sutton had to open the road before we could get to our intended home. We soon erected a small cabin with four window lights in one side and stick chimney, and blankets for doors. Here as formerly our room was soon enlivened by the cheerful presence of kind friends. By industry and economy and proper improvement of time we soon became more comfortably situated. There was a great many wild animals infested this uncultivated country, such as wolves and deers, and turkeys, and wild hogs, and some of the more dangerous animals would often approach the houses. Some ladies were brave enough to shoot at them to the great delight of the settlers, and sometimes would meet one of the reptile tribe that tempted Eve. Sometimes they would offer battle and effect their designs, to the great suffering of individuals. But notwithstanding, we had our disadvantages we had our pleasures. There was a grand quality of socibility among the people. One instance we had a great number visiting at our house, I jestingly said to Mr. Sutton, "Please step out and kill a wild turkey for dinner." He went to where they ranged and killed three in one shot. They were sitting on the fence. It gave great amusement to the visitors. At another time he killed two deers at one shot. Many others were fortunate in obtaining wild meat for their families.

    Sometimes there would be wagon loads of friends go and assist some lady quilt and the gentlemen would gather at the same place and assist in rolling logs and clearing. They would have grand enjoyment in each others society and partaking of a fine dinner, such as the new country afforded, rare delacacies. When we had week day preaching we would lay our work by and attend without fail. It often would last all day and sometimes part of the night. In times of quarterly or two days' meetings, we would take home with us fifteen or twenty persons. We worshiped in log houses or cabins. The dear Savious (sic) met with us and we were happy. Our benches were made of split timber, and no person thought strange of it. I could name many things that would seem strange to the people in this advanced age. In our united efforts to serve the Lord we sometimes traveled thrugh muddy roads and deep water. It will not be long until all of those land marks will be one and will be known only in the hearts of grateful people. We may forget the gratitude we owe to those brave men and families. They have toiled and denied themselves the comforts of life to give the following generation. The have endured the forest and subdued the wilderness and made it to but and blossom as the rose with the richest flowers, and to bring forth fruit in most bountiful profusion for the enjoyment of rising generations. How thankful we ought to be, how sacredly should we cherish their memory. They occupy in the temple of fame a place which in the great rush of modern life, people are apt to pass by unnoticed. If their had labors of years ago were borne in mind they would be recognized as being the more worthy of earth.

    The great foundation that was laid by our pioneer citizens; the wilderness was cleared, but on it was made the great and marvelous improvemnt of to-day. Too much credit cannot be given to these enterprising citizens for the grand work that has been accomplished, to the great advantage of all the people of Jay County. The original town of Redkey was laid out under the name of Mount Vernon about the year 1848. The first store and first postoffice was established one-half mile south of the present location. From that time forward to the time of finding of large quantities of gas, the town has steadly increased. Redkey has enjoyed a steady growth; the population is 4000. We have three large glass factories, heading and hub factory, slate factory, three saw mills, one grist mill, one fine elevator, a very fine $25,000 school building, and a new M.E. church costing neear $15,000, and square after square of imposing and city-like brick business blocks, miles and miles of cement and brick sidewalks. With our large natural gas territory and the prospect of oil in the near future, will make Redkey the metropolis of the great Indiana gas and oil field. We are situated at the crossing of the Panhandle and the L.E. & W. railroads. It gives great opportunity for shipping. We are favored with one of the best lumber yards in the state, and also a fine printing press and postoffice of modern style. The muddy roads have given place to miles of fine pike; the log cabins are something of the past, and instead there are large and valuable frame and brick residences, and grandly improved farms. We cannot do justice between now and fifty years past, the contrast is too great.

    VINE COTTAGE, REDKEY, May 9th, 1896. - Dear Sister Lynch: - I have not been well since you was at our house. I fear I have not done justice to this imperfect history. But I have done the best I could under the circumstances. Some pieces of history that I will send have been printed years ago. The one on temperance I composed and wrote years ago, to be read at a temperance meeting. An editor was there and wished to print it. It recalls to my mind the real circumstances in connection with it, that you may please return the history. I have had a very imperfect education. I only went to school six months in all, and that was to a country school. Mr. Sutton and I have been married sixty years last March, 23rd, 1836. He was born March 8th, 1816, and I was born August 4th, 1815, so we are 80 years old. He engages in all the activities of life, in matrimony and church services, and I continue to write history and compose poetry, as I have done for years past, ever since I could write. Dear sister, you must excuse mistakes that I have made in writing or spelling, especially.
    -- MARY SUTTON, Wife of Rev. D.B. Sutton

  3. Jay, Indiana, United States. 1850 U.S. Census Population Schedule. (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration Publication M432).

    Year: 1850; Census Place: Richland, Jay, Indiana; Roll: M432_153; Page: 358B; Image: 165.
    -----
    Name: Mary J Sutton Age: 34 Birth Year: abt 1816 Birthplace: Ohio Home in 1850: Richland, Jay, Indiana Gender: Female Family Number: 56

  4. Jay, Indiana, United States. 1860 U.S. Census Population Schedule. (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration Publication M693).

    Year: 1860; Census Place: Richland, Jay, Indiana; Roll: M653_269; Page: 102; Image: 102; Family History Library Film: 803269.
    -----
    Name: Mary J Sutton
    Age in 1860: 43
    Birth Year: abt 1817
    Birthplace: Virginia
    Home in 1860: Richland, Jay, Indiana
    Gender: Female
    Post Office: Halfway

  5. Jay, Indiana, United States. 1870 U.S. Census Population Schedule. (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration Publication M593).

    Year: 1870; Census Place: Richland, Jay, Indiana; Roll: M593_327; Page: 155B; Image: 314; Family History Library Film: 545826.
    -----
    Name: Mary J Sutton
    Age in 1870: 53
    Birth Year: abt 1817
    Birthplace: Virginia
    Home in 1870: Richland, Jay, Indiana
    Race: White
    Gender: Female
    Post Office: Red Key