Place:Washington, Tennessee, United States

Watchers
Contained Places
Cemetery
Leesburg Presbyterian Church Cemetery
Census-designated place
Gray
Midway
Oak Grove
Inhabited place
Adams Mill
Arbor Heights
Asbury
Austin Springs
Austin Village
Avondale Forest
Bald Crossing
Beechwood Court
Bel Air One
Bel Air Two
Belmont Acres
Big Cherokee
Big Sandy
Boone Trail
Boone
Boones Creek
Bowmantown
Breezy Hills
Brookmead
Brownsboro
Broylesville
Buckstone Hills
Buffalo Ridge
Camelot Two
Camelot
Camp Wildwood
Carmol
Carter Crossing
Carter Sell
Charbray
Cherokee Gardens
Cherokee Hills
Cherokee
Christie
Clark Manor
Clarkson
Colony Park
Conklin
Crouch Crossroad
Dogwood Acres
Dove
Dry Creek
Ducktown
East Park
East Ridge
El Rancho
Embreeville
Englewood
Fairlawn
Fairview
Fall Branch
February
Flourville
Ford Crossing
Forest Hills
Forest View
Fourville
Foxxborough
Gabtown
Garber
Garland Acres
Georgia Terrace
Gilmer Park
Gladstone
Glen Ridge
Glendale
Gomp Addition
Graham Mill
Gravel Hill
Green Valley
Greenacres
Greenfield Heights
Greenfields
Greenwood
Hacker
Hale
Harmony
Hartmantown
Haws Crossroads
Hickory Lake
Hill-N-Dale
Hillrise
Hiwassee Heights
Holly Hill
Holmes
Idlewilde
Indian Ridge
Johnson City ( 1760 - )
Jonesborough ( 1700 - )
Keebler Crossroads
Keys Mill
Kitzmiller
Leesburg
Liberty
Limestone
Little Cherokee
Locust Mount
Luke
Maison
Matuta
Maucks
Mayday
Mayflower
McKinley
Meadowbrook
Melrose
Mill Brook
Miller
Millercrest
Mitchell Springs
Montcastle Hills
Montclair
Monterey Hills
Mount Carmel
N C Love Addition
New Victory
Nolichucky
North Acres
Oak Hill
Oakland Gardens
Oakland Village
Oakland
Onks
Painter Spring
Philadelphia
Pine Hills
Pine Ridge
Pine Timbers
Piney Grove
Pleasant Valley
Princeton Hills
Ramblewood
Reece Terrace
Reston Court
Ridge
Roan Hill
Rolling Hills
Roundtree
S E Miller
Seaton
Seminole Woods
Sequoyah Heights
Sherwood Forest
Skyline Heights
South Gate Village
South Gate
Southwest Addition
Spurgeon
Stewart Hill
Stoney Brook
Strawberry Fields
Sulphur Springs
Tamarack
Tamassee
Taylor Mill
Telford
The Y
Timber Ridge
Timberlake
Towne Acres
Tunbridge
Washington College PO and Station
Washington Heights
Watauga Flats
Wayfield
Wellington Park
West Hills
West Oakland Park
Westover Hills
Westwood-Gray
Wheelocktown
Woodhill Addition
Woodlawn
Woodstone
Y Section
Unknown
Muddy Creek
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 122,979. Its county seat is Jonesborough. The county's largest city and a regional educational, medical and commercial center is Johnson City. Washington County is Tennessee's oldest county, having been established in 1777 when the state was still part of North Carolina.

Washington County is part of the Johnson City Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is a component of the Johnson City–KingsportBristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area – commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Washington County is rooted in the Watauga settlements, which were established in the early 1770s in the vicinity of what is now Elizabethton, in adjacent Carter County. At the outbreak of the Revolutionary War in 1776, the Wataugans organized the "Washington District," which was governed by a committee of safety. North Carolina initially refused to recognize the settlements as legal, but finally agreed to annex the district after the settlers thwarted an invasion by hostile Cherokees. The settlements were governed as the Washington District, which originally included all of what is now Tennessee. The district was reorganized as Washington County in 1777.

From 1784 through 1788, the county was part of the State of Franklin, an early attempt to create a fourteenth state prior to Kentucky and Vermont's admissions into the union. It then became part of the Southwest Territory in 1790, and finally, part of Tennessee after it was admitted to the Union in 1796 as the 16th state.[1] Jonesborough, the county seat of Washington County, is Tennessee's oldest town. With many buildings restored, it comprises one of the nation's most authentic historic districts of the period 1790–1870.

Washington County was divided between pro-Union and pro-secession sentiments at the outset of the Civil War. In Tennessee's Ordinance of Secession referendum on June 8, 1861, Washington Countians voted 1,445 to 1,022 in favor of remaining in the Union. One of the bridges targeted by the East Tennessee bridge-burners in November 1861 was located in what is now Watauga near the Washington-Carter county line. Landon Carter Haynes, a Confederate senator, hailed from Washington County.[1]

Johnson City, originally known as Johnson's Depot, was a major railway center for the southeastern states, connecting the region for freight transportation and passengers. It was the headquarters for both the standard-gauge Carolina, Clinchfield, and Ohio (Clinchfield Railroad), which required the excavation and blasting of 17 tunnels during its construction; and the narrow-gauge East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad (Tweetsie). Significant restoration is underway, as well as publicizing the railroad heritage of the Johnson's Depot Historic District. Other historic properties are being restored as representative of Johnson City's late nineteenth and early twentieth-century era as a railway center.

Timeline

Date Event Source
1777 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1778 Court records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1778 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1778 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1787 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1790 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1908 Birth records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1940 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1790 5,872
1800 6,379
1810 7,740
1820 9,557
1830 10,995
1840 11,751
1850 13,861
1860 14,829
1870 16,317
1880 16,181
1890 20,354
1900 22,604
1910 28,968
1920 34,052
1930 45,805
1940 51,631
1950 59,971
1960 64,832
1970 73,924
1980 88,755
1990 92,315

Research Tips

External Links

  • Outstanding guide to Washington County family history and genealogy resources (FamilySearch Research Wiki). Birth, marriage, and death records, censuses, wills, deeds, county histories, cemeteries, churches, naturalizations, newspapers, libraries, and genealogical societies.


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Washington County, Tennessee. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.