Place:Tasmania, Australia

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NameTasmania
Alt namesTasmaniensource: Rand McNally Atlas (1994) I-173
Van Diemen's Landsource: Times Atlas of World History (1989) p 357
TypeState
Coordinates43°S 147.0°E
Located inAustralia     (1901 - )
Contained Places
Unknown
Forest South
County
Glamorgan
Inhabited place
Bagdad
Beaconsfield
Beauty Point
Bicheno
Bishopsbourne
Blackmans Bay
Blackwood Creek
Boat Harbour
Bothwell
Bracknell
Bridgewater
Bridport
Brighton
Bronte Park
Burnie
Cambridge
Campbell Town
Clarence
Conara Junction
Cressy
Currie
Deddington
Deloraine
Derby
Derwent Bridge
Devonport ( 1750 - )
Doo Town
Dover
Egg Lagoon
Emita
Evandale
Fingal
Geeveston
Geilston Bay
George Town
Glenorchy
Gormanston
Grassy
Herrick
Hobart ( 1804 - )
Huonville
Hythe
Irishtown
Kingston
Lady Barron
Latrobe
Lauderdale
Launceston
Liffey
Lilydale
Longford
Margate
Marrawah
Maydena
Meander
Midway Point
Mole Creek
Moonah
New Norfolk
Oatlands
Ouse
Penguin
Perth
Pontville
Port Arthur
Port Sorell
Queenstown
Railton
Riana
Richmond
Roseberry
Rosebery
Ross
Saint Marys
Scottsdale
Sheffield
Sisters Beach
Smithton
Somerset
Sorell
St Helens
Stanley
Strahan
Strathgordon
Swansea
Tarraleah
Triabunna
Ulverstone
Waddamana
Waratah
Westbury
Whitemark
Wynyard
Zeehan
Inhabited region
Preminghana
Locality
Upper Scamander
Region
Kangaroo Island
Registration district
Great Swan Port
Horton
Unknown
Albert Park
Alberton
Avoca
Back River
Barnes Bay
Barrington
Battery Point
Bellerive
Bismarck
Black River
Branxholm
Bream Creek
Broadmarsh
Bruny Island
Buckland
Bushy Park
Cape Barren Island
Carlton
Caveside
Cethana
Chudleigh
Circular Head
Claremont
Clarence Point
Claude Road
Cooee
Cornelian Bay
Cornwall
Cranbrook
Craythorne
Crotty
Cullenswood
Deloraine Probation Station
Detention River
Don
Dundas
Dunorlan
Eldon
Exeter
Exton
Falmouth
Flinders Island
Flowerdale
Forcett
Forest Hall
Forth
Franklin
Furneaux Group
Georgetown
German Town
Gladstone
Glen Huon
Glenora
Goshen
Gould's Country
Gray
Guildford
Hagley
Hamilton
Hamilton-on-Forth
Hastings
Heka
Hillwood
Huon River
Invermay
Jerusalem
Karoola
Kempton
Kentishbury
Kettering
Kindred
King Island
Lefroy
Legana
Legerwood
Legunia
Levendale
Loorana
Lower Barrington
Lower Turners Marsh
Lyell
Maatsuyker Islands
Macquarie Harbour
Mangana
Maria Island
Maria
Mathinna
Maurice
Mella
Melrose
Merton
Monmouth
Montagu
Mooreville Road
Mount Hicks
Nabowla
New River
New Town
Nook
North Motton
Nugent
Old Beach
Orford
Paradise
Parkham
Port Cygnet
Port Dalrymple
Port Esperance
Raminea
Reedy Marsh
Ridgley
Ringarooma
Romaine
Roseneath
Rosevears
Sandy Bay
Sassafrass
Scopus
Sisters Creek
South Arm
Southport
Spring Bay
St. Helen's
St. Leonards
St. Mary's
Stowport
Swan Island
Taroona
Tea Tree
Teepoo Kana
Trewalla
Tullah
Tunnel
Turners Marsh
Underwood
Wattle Hill
Weegena
Wesley Vale
Whitemore
Wilmot
Windermere
Wivenhoe
Woodbridge
Yambacoona
Young Town
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Tasmania (abbreviated as Tas and known colloquially as "Tassie"; GB and US ) is an island state, part of the Commonwealth of Australia, located to the south of the Australian continent, separated by Bass Strait. The state includes the island of Tasmania, the 26th largest island in the world, and the surrounding 334 islands. The state has a population of 507,626, of whom almost half reside in the greater Hobart precinct. Tasmania's area is , of which the main island covers .

Tasmania is promoted as the natural state, the "Island of Inspiration", and A World Apart, Not A World Away owing to its large and relatively unspoiled natural environment. Almost 45% of Tasmania lies in reserves, national parks and World Heritage Sites. The island is long from its northernmost to its southernmost points, and from west to east.

The state capital and largest city is Hobart, which encompasses the local government areas of City of Hobart, City of Glenorchy, and City of Clarence, while the satellite town of Kingston (part of the Municipality of Kingborough) is generally included in the Greater Hobart area.

The northernmost terrestrial point of the state of Tasmania is Boundary Islet, a nature reserve in Bass Strait which, due to a quirk of history, is shared with the state of Victoria.

The subantarctic Macquarie Island and its surrounding islands are also under the administration of Tasmania as a nature reserve and part of the Huon Valley Council local government area. The Bishop and Clerk Islets, about 37 km south of Macquarie Island, are the southernmost terrestrial point of the state of Tasmania, and the southernmost internationally recognised land in Australia.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Physical history

The island was adjoined to the mainland of Australia until the end of the last glacial period approximately 10,000 years ago. Much of the island is composed of Jurassic dolerite intrusions (upwellings of magma) through other rock types, sometimes forming large columnar joints. Tasmania has the world's largest areas of dolerite, with many distinctive mountains and cliffs formed from this rock type.

The central plateau and the southeast portions of the island are mostly dolerite. Mount Wellington above Hobart is a good example, showing distinct columns known as the Organ Pipes. In the southern midlands as far south as Hobart, the dolerite is underlaid by sandstone and similar sedimentary stones. In the southwest, Precambrian quartzites were formed from very ancient sea sediments and form strikingly sharp ridges and ranges, such as Federation Peak or Frenchmans Cap.

In the northeast and east, continental granites can be seen, such as at Freycinet, similar to coastal granites on mainland Australia. In the northwest and west, mineral-rich volcanic rock can be seen at Mount Read near Rosebery, or at Mount Lyell near Queenstown. Also present in the south and northwest is limestone with magnificent caves.

The quartzite and dolerite areas in the higher mountains show evidence of glaciation, and much of Australia's glaciated landscape is found on the Central Plateau and the Southwest. Cradle Mountain, another dolerite peak, for example, was a nunatak. The combination of these different rock types offers incredible scenery, much of it distinct from any other region of the world. In the far southwest corner of the state, the geology is almost completely quartzite, which gives the mountains the false impression of having snow-capped peaks year round.

Indigenous people

Tasmania was first inhabited by the Tasmanian Aborigines. Evidence indicates their presence in the region, later to become an island, at least 35,000 years ago. Rising sea levels cut Tasmania off from mainland Australia about 10,000 years ago.

By the time of European contact, the Aboriginal people in Tasmania had nine major ethnic groups. At the time of British settlement in 1803, the indigenous population was estimated at between 5,000 and 10,000 people. Through the introduction of infectious diseases to which they had no immunity, war, persecution and intermarriage, the population dwindled to 300 by 1833. Almost all of the indigenous population was relocated to Flinders Island by George Augustus Robinson.

A woman named Truganini (1812–1876) is generally recognised as the last full-blooded Tasmanian Aborigine. Strong evidence suggests that the last survivor was another woman, Fanny Cochrane Smith, who was born at Wybalena and died in 1905.

European arrival

The first reported sighting of Tasmania by a European was on 24 November 1642 by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman. Tasman landed at today's Blackman Bay. In 1773, Tobias Furneaux was the first Englishman to land in Tasmania at Adventure Bay. A French expedition led by Marc-Joseph Marion du Fresne also landed at Blackman Bay in 1772.

Captain James Cook landed at Adventure Bay in 1777—with young William Bligh aboard. Bligh returned in 1788 (HMS Bounty) and again in 1792 (HMS Providence), with young Matthew Flinders aboard. Numerous other Europeans made landfalls, adding a colourful array to the names of topographical features. Matthew Flinders and George Bass first proved Tasmania to be an island in 1798–99.


The first settling of Tasmania was by the British at Risdon Cove on the eastern bank of the Derwent estuary. In 1800, the French sent an expedition led by Commander Baudin to explore the South Seas. It was suspected that the reason for this expedition was to try to establish a French colony on the coast of New Holland. In response to this, the Lady Nelson and the whaler Albion, both commanded by Lieutenant John Bowen, sailed from Port Jackson on 31 August 1803. Bowen arrived in the Derwent on Sunday, 12 September 1803, in the Albion. The Lady Nelson had arrived five days before, on 7 September. 12 September is regarded as the birthday of the colony (now state) of Tasmania. Lieutenant Bowen chose Risdon Cove on the left bank of the Derwent a few miles above Hobart. Among the settlers were 21 male convicts and an overseer and three women, besides the officers and two free settlers. About two months later, the colony had increased to 100 people. An alternative settlement was established by Captain David Collins to the south in 1804 in Sullivans Cove on the western side of the Derwent, where fresh water was more plentiful. The latter settlement became known as Hobart Town or Hobarton, later shortened to Hobart, after the British Colonial Secretary of the time, Lord Hobart. The settlement at Risdon was later abandoned.

The early settlers were mostly convicts and their military guards, with the task of developing agriculture and other industries. Numerous other convict-based settlements were made in Van Diemen's Land, including secondary prisons, such as the particularly harsh penal colonies at Port Arthur in the southeast and Macquarie Harbour on the West Coast. In the 50 years from 1803 to 1853, around 75,000 convicts were transported to Tasmania. Van Diemen's Land was proclaimed a separate colony from New South Wales, with its own judicial establishment and Legislative Council, on 3 December 1825.

Colony of Tasmania

The Colony of Tasmania (more commonly referred to simply as "Tasmania") was a British colony that existed on the island of Tasmania from 1856 until 1901, when it federated together with the five other Australian colonies to form the Commonwealth of Australia. The possibility of the colony was established when the Westminster Parliament passed the Australian Colonies Government Act 1850, granting the right of legislative power to each of the six Australian colonies.

The Legislative Council of Van Diemen's Land drafted a new constitution which they passed in 1854, and it was given Royal Assent by Queen Victoria in 1855. Later in that year the Privy Council approved the colony changing its name from "Van Diemen's Land" to "Tasmania", and in 1856, the newly elected bicameral parliament sat for the first time, establishing Tasmania as a self-governing colony of the British Empire.

The Colony suffered from economic fluctuations, but for the most part was prosperous, experiencing steady growth. With few external threats and strong trade links with the Empire, the Colony of Tasmania enjoyed many fruitful periods in the late 19th century, becoming a world-centre of shipbuilding. It raised a local defence force which eventually played a significant role in the Second Boer War in South Africa, and Tasmanian soldiers in that conflict won the first two Victoria Crosses awarded to Australians. Tasmanians voted in favour of federation with the largest majority of all the Australian colonies, and on 1 January 1901 the Colony of Tasmania became the Australian state of Tasmania.

Recent history

The state was badly affected by the 1967 Tasmanian fires, in which there was major loss of life and property. In the 1970s, the state government announced plans to flood environmentally significant Lake Pedder. As a result of the eventual flooding of Lake Pedder, the world's first greens party was established; the United Tasmania Group.

In 1975, the Tasman Bridge collapsed when the bridge was struck by the bulk ore carrier MV Lake Illawarra. This made crossing the Derwent River at Hobart almost impossible.

National and international attention surrounded the campaign against the Franklin Dam in the early 1980s.

On 28 April 1996, in the incident now known as the Port Arthur massacre, lone gunman Martin Bryant shot and killed 35 people (including tourists and residents) and injured 21 others. The use of firearms was immediately reviewed, and new gun ownership laws were adopted nationwide, with Tasmania's law one of the strictest in Australia.

In April 2006, the Beaconsfield Mine collapse was triggered by a small earthquake. One person was killed and two others were trapped underground for 14 days.

The Tasmanian community has for some time been divided over the issue of the proposed Bell Bay Pulp Mill to be built in the Tamar Valley. Proponents argue that jobs will be created, while opponents argue that pollution will damage both the Bass Strait fishing industry and local tourism.

In January 2011, wealthy philanthropist David Walsh opened the Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) in Hobart to international acclaim. Within 12 months, MONA became Tasmania's top tourism attraction.

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