Place:Tajikistan

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NameTajikistan
Alt namesJumhurii Tojikistansource: Britannica Book of the Year (1993) p 726
Republic of Tajikistansource: Wikipedia
Tadzhik S.S.R.source: Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1984)
Tadzhikistansource: Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1988) p 1179
Tadzhikskayasource: Cambridge World Gazetteer (1990) p 629
Tadzhikskaya S.S.R.source: Times Atlas of the World (1988)
Tadžhikskaja Sovetskaja Socialistčeskaja Respublikasource: Rand McNally Atlas (1989) I-173
Tadžikistansource: Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer (1961); USBGN: Foreign Gazetteers
Tajik Soviet Socialist Republicsource: Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1988) p 1181
Tajik SSRsource: Times Atlas of World History (1993) p 357
Tojikistansource: Getty Vocabulary Program
TypeCountry
Coordinates39°N 71°E
Contained Places
Autonomous region
Kǔhistoni Badakhshon
Former administrative division
Kurgan-Tyubinskaya
Kŭlob
Independent city
Dushanbe
Inhabited place
Parkhar
Pyandj
Shaartuz
Region
Khatlon ( 1999 - )
Region of Republican Subordination
Sughd
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Tajikistan (, or ; ), officially the Republic of Tajikistan (Çumhuriyi Toçikiston/Jumhuriyi Tojikiston; , Respublika Tadzhikistan), is a mountainous landlocked country in Central Asia. It borders Afghanistan to the south, Uzbekistan to the west, Kyrgyzstan to the north, and China to the east. Pakistan is separated from Tajikistan by the narrow Wakhan Corridor in the south.

Most of Tajikistan's population belongs to the Persian-speaking Tajik ethnic group, who share language, culture and history with Afghanistan and Iran. Once part of the Samanid Empire, Tajikistan became a constituent republic of the Soviet Union in the 20th century, known as the Tajik Soviet Socialist Republic (Tajik SSR). Mountains cover more than 90% of the republic. After independence, Tajikistan suffered from a devastating civil war which lasted from 1992 to 1997. Since the end of the war, newly established political stability and foreign aid have allowed the country's economy to grow. Trade in commodities such as cotton, aluminium and uranium has contributed greatly to this steady improvement.

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How places in Tajikistan are organized

All places in Tajikistan

Further information on historical place organization in Tajikistan

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