Place:Iran

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NameIran
Alt namesIR00source: NIMA, GEOnet Names Server (1998-2000) accessed 01/20/99
Iránsource: Cassell's Spanish Dictionary (1978) p 376
Irãsource: Rand McNally Atlas (1994) p 319
Islamic Republic of Iransource: Encyclopædia Britannica (1988); NIMA, GEOnet Names Server (1996-1998)
Jomhori-e-Islami-e-Irânsource: Cambridge World Gazetteer (1990) p 290-292
Jomhuri-ye Eslami-ye Iransource: Encyclopædia Britannica (1988) VI, 374-376
Jomhūri-ye Eslamī-ye Irānsource: Britannica Book of the Year (1991) p 623; Britannica Book of the Year (1993) p 630
Persesource: BHA, Authority file (2003-)
Persiasource: Wikipedia
Îrānsource: Getty Vocabulary Program
TypeNation
Coordinates32°N 53°E
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Iran ( or ; ), also known as Persia ( or ),[1] officially the Islamic Republic of Iran since 1980, is a country in Western Asia. It is bordered on the north by Armenia, Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan, with Kazakhstan and Russia across the Caspian Sea; on the east by Afghanistan and Pakistan; on the south by the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman; on the west by Iraq; and on the northwest by Turkey. Comprising a land area of , it is the second-largest nation in the Middle East and the 18th-largest in the world; with over 77 million inhabitants, Iran is the world's 17th most populous nation.[2] It is the only country that has both a Caspian Sea and Indian Ocean coastline. Iran has been of geostrategic importance because of its central location in Eurasia and Western Asia and the Strait of Hormuz.

Iran is home to one of the world's oldest civilizations, beginning with the formation of the Proto-Elamite and Elamite kingdom in 3200 – 2800 BCE. The Iranian Medes unified the country into the first of many empires in 625 BCE, after which it became the dominant cultural and political power in the region. Iran reached the pinnacle of its power during the Achaemenid Empire founded by Cyrus the Great in 550 BCE, which at its greatest extent comprised major portions of the ancient world, stretching from the Indus Valley in the east, to Thrace and Macedon on the northeastern border of Greece, making it the largest empire the world had yet seen. The empire collapsed in 330 BCE following the conquests of Alexander the Great. The area eventually regained influence under the Parthian Empire and rose to prominence once more after the establishment of the Sasanian dynasty in 224 CE, under which Iran became one of the leading powers of Western and Central Asia for the next four centuries.

Manichaeism and Zoroastrianism were largely replaced after Arab Muslims invaded Persia in 633 CE, and conquered it by 651 CE. Iran thereafter played a vital role in the subsequent Islamic Golden Age, producing numerous influential scientists, scholars, artists, and thinkers. The emergence in 1501 of the Safavid dynasty, which promoted the Twelver school of thought as the official religion, marked one of the most important turning points in Iranian and Muslim history.[3] It also culminated into tensions, which in 1514 led to the Battle of Chaldiran. The Persian Constitutional Revolution of 1906 established the nation's first parliament, which operated within a constitutional monarchy. Following a coup d'état instigated by the UK and the US in 1953, Iran gradually became autocratic. Growing dissent against foreign influence and political repression culminated in the Iranian Revolution, which led to the establishment of an Islamic republic on 1 April 1979.[4][5]

Tehran is the capital and largest city, serving as the cultural, commercial, and industrial center of the nation. Iran is a major regional and middle power, exerting considerable influence in international energy security and the world economy through its large reserves of fossil fuels, which include the largest natural gas supply in the world and the fourth-largest proven petroleum reserves. It hosts Asia's fourth-largest number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Globally, it ranks 8th in the world for the amount of books published per year, and was ranked first in scientific progress in the world in 2011.

Iran is a founding member of the UN, NAM, OIC and OPEC. Its unique political system, based on the 1979 constitution, combines elements of a parliamentary democracy with a religious theocracy run by the country's clergy, wherein the Supreme Leader wields significant influence. A multicultural nation comprising numerous ethnic and linguistic groups, most inhabitants are Shi'ites, the Iranian rial is its currency, and Persian is the official language. The electoral victory of Hassan Rouhani in 2013 has improved Iran's relations with other countries.

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Iran. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.