Place:Sykehouse, West Riding of Yorkshire, England

Watchers
NameSykehouse
TypeCivil parish
Coordinates53.6417°N 1.05°W
Located inWest Riding of Yorkshire, England     ( - 1974)
Also located inSouth Yorkshire, England     (1974 - )
Yorkshire, England    
See alsoThorne Rural, West Riding of Yorkshire, Englandrural district of which it was a part until 1974
Doncaster (metropolitan borough), South Yorkshire, Englandmetropolitan borough of which it has been a part since 1974
source: Family History Library Catalog
the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

The civil parish of Sykehouse is a civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England, on the border with the East Riding of Yorkshire. It had a population of 438 in 2001.

Historically, Sykehouse was in the ecclesiastical parish of Fishlake in the lower division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill. From 1894 until 1974, Sykehouse was located in Thorne Rural District.

Contents

Geography

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Sykehouse is a largely rural area containing a handful of small hamlets. Its northern border is marked by the River Went, while the River Don marks its eastern boundary. The New Junction Canal bisects the parish. It is said to be the longest village in Yorkshire, as it stretches for nearly along its main street. Sykehouse is the origin of the extremely rare Sykehouse Russet apple, an old English variety which was thought to have been lost, but was rediscovered growing in gardens in Oxfordshire and the Doncaster area in 1999.

Sykehouse contains the following settlements:

Eskholme

the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Eskholme is a hamlet on the River Went, and is located at approximately 53° 39' North, 1° 0' 30" West, at an elevation of around 4 metres above sea level.

Pincheon Green

the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Pincheon Green is little more than a small row of houses, and is located at approximately 53° 39' North, 1° 2' 20" West, at an elevation of around 4 metres above sea level.

Sykehouse

the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Sykehouse is the largest of the villages within the parish, and contains the parish church of the Holy Trinity. Most of this grade II listed building was built in 1869 by C. H. Fowler, using red bricks and a Gothic Revival style. The tower is older, having been built in 1721, while the font is fifteenth century, but this is presumed to have come from elsewhere.[4] Other listed buildings include a red-brick and rubble barn, attached to Marsh Hills Farmhouse,[5] and the farmhouse itself, which is early eighteenth century with twentieth century alterations.[6] The village is located at approximately 53° 38' 30" North, 1° 3' West, at an elevation of around 4 metres above sea level.

Topham

the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Topham is a rural hamlet on the River Went, alongside a dismantled railway. Also, because of its situation on the river; it is liable to flooding. It is located at approximately 53°38′40″N 1°3′40″W, at an elevation of around 5 metres above sea level. The main structure of an early nineteenth century tower mill, which is now part of a house forms part of the hamlet,[7] and the track to Balne Lodge and Balne Hall crosses the River Went at Topham Ferry bridge, a single-arched brick structure built in the early nineteenth century and little altered, although in poor condition.[8]

Research Tips

  • GENUKI on Sykehouse. The GENUKI page gives numerous references to local bodies providing genealogical assistance.
  • The FamilySearch wiki on the ecclesiastical parish of Fishlake provides a list of useful resources for the local area.
  • A Vision of Britain through Time on Sykehouse.
  • A Vision of Britain through Time also provides links to three maps for what is now South Yorkshire, produced by the United Kingdom Ordnance Survey, illustrating the boundaries between the civil parishes and the rural districts at various dates. These maps all blow up to a scale that will illustrate small villages and large farms or estates.
  • Ordnance Survey West Riding 1888. The "Sanitary Districts (which preceded the rural districts) for the whole of the West Riding.
  • Ordnance Survey West Riding South 1900. The rural and urban districts, not long after their introduction. (the southern part of Bradford, the southern part of Leeds, the southern part of Tadcaster Rural District, the southern part of Selby, Goole Rural District, and all the divisions of Halifax, Huddersfield, Wakefield, Doncaster, Barnsley, Rotherham and Sheffield)
  • Ordnance Survey West Riding 1944. The urban and rural districts of the whole of the West Riding after the revisions of 1935.


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Sykehouse. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.