Place:Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

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NameNottingham
Alt namesSnotingahamsource: Encyclopædia Britannica (1988) VIII, 805
TypeCity, Borough, Unitary authority
Coordinates52.967°N 1.167°W
Located inNottinghamshire, England
Contained Places
Cemetery
St Mary's Church
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Nottingham is a city and unitary authority in the East Midlands of England; County town of the ceremonial county of Nottinghamshire

Nottingham is famed for its links to the legend of Robin Hood and, during the Industrial Revolution, obtained worldwide recognition for its lace-making, bicycle and tobacco industries. Nottingham's origins are traceable back to 600 AD, however, it was only granted its city charter in 1897, as part of the Diamond Jubilee celebrations of Queen Victoria, and has since been officially titled the City of Nottingham.

Nottingham is the second largest city in the East Midlands (after Leicester), with a population of 305,700. This relatively small population is due to the tightly drawn official city boundary; the wider Nottingham Urban Area has a population of approximately 729,977, making it the ninth largest urban area in the United Kingdom. Eurostat listed Nottingham's population at 825,600 in 2004.

Nottingham has a number of famous institutions and venues – including the National Ice Centre, the National Water Sports Centre, a world-famous Test cricket ground, two professional English Football League teams, and top-flight cricket and ice hockey sides. In addition, over 60,000 students attend the city's two universities Nottingham Trent University and the University of Nottingham.

Culturally, there are two large-capacity theatres, numerous museums and art galleries, an independent cinema, and several live music venues, including the Nottingham Arena and Rock City, both of which regularly host major UK and international artists. In 2013 Nottingham was also named the most haunted city in England.[1]

Nottingham was named Transport City of the Year in October 2012. The city has the largest publicly owned bus network in the UK, and is also served by a large railway station (in addition to several suburban stations), and an expanding tram system. East Midlands Airport is located just over 10 miles to the south-west of the city.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

In Anglo-Saxon times the area was part of the Kingdom of Mercia, and was known in the Brythonic language as Tigguo Cobauc, meaning Place of Caves. In Welsh it is known poetically as Y Ty Ogofog and Irish Gaelic as Na Tithe Uaimh "The Cavey Dwelling". When it fell under the rule of a Saxon chieftain named Snot it became known as "Snotingaham"; the homestead of Snot's people (Inga = the people of; Ham = homestead). Snot brought together his people in an area now known as the Lace Market.

Nottingham was captured in 867 by Viking/Danish Great Heathen Army and later became one of the Five Burghs – or fortified towns – of The Danelaw.

Nottingham Castle was constructed in the 11th century on a sandstone outcrop by the River Leen. The Anglo-Saxon settlement developed into the English Borough of Nottingham and housed a Town Hall and Law Courts. A settlement also developed around the castle on the hill opposite and was the French borough supporting the Normans in the castle. Eventually, the space between was built on as the town grew and the Old Market Square became the focus of Nottingham several centuries later. On the return of Richard the Lion Heart from the Crusades, the castle stood out in Prince John's favour. It was besieged by Richard and, after a sharp conflict, was captured.

By the 15th century Nottingham had established itself as a centre of a thriving export trade in religious sculpture made from Nottingham Alabaster. The town became a county corporate in 1449 giving it effective self-government, in the words of the charter, "for eternity". The Castle and Shire Hall were expressly excluded and remained as detached Parishes of Nottinghamshire.


During the Industrial Revolution, much of Nottingham's prosperity was founded on the textile industry; in particular, the city became an internationally important centre of lace manufacture. In 1831 citizens rioted in protest against the Duke of Newcastle's opposition to the Reform Act 1832, setting fire to his residence, Nottingham Castle.

In common with the UK textile industry, Nottingham's textile sector fell into decline in the decades following World War II. Very little textile manufacture now takes place in Nottingham, however, many of the former industrial buildings in the Lace Market district have been restored and put to new uses.

Nottingham was one of the boroughs reformed by the Municipal Corporations Act 1835, and at that time consisted of the parishes of St Mary, St Nicholas and St Peter. It was expanded in 1877 by adding the parishes of Basford, Brewhouse Yard, Bulwell, Radford, Sneinton, Standard Hill and parts of the parishes of West Bridgford, Carlton, Wilford (North Wilford). In 1889 Nottingham became a county borough under the Local Government Act 1888. City status was awarded as part of the Diamond Jubilee celebrations of Queen Victoria, being signified in a letter from the Prime Minister the Marquess of Salisbury to the Mayor, dated 18 June 1897. Nottingham was extended in 1933 by adding Bilborough and Wollaton, parts of the parishes of Bestwood Park and Colwick, and a recently developed part of the Beeston Urban District. A further boundary extension was granted in 1951 when Clifton and Wilford (south of the River Trent) were incorporated into the city.

Demographic evolution of Nottingham

Year Population
4th century <37
10th century <1,000
11th century 1,500
14th century 3,000
Early 17th century 4,000
Year Population
Late 17th century 5,000
1801 29,000
1811 34,000
1821 40,000
1831 51,000
Year Population
1841 53,000
1851 58,000
1861 76,000
1871 87,000
1881 159,000
Year Population
1901 240,000
1911 260,000
1921 269,000
1931 265,000
1951 306,000
Year Population
1961 312,000
1971 301,000
1981 278,000
1991 273,000
2001 275,000

Electric trams were introduced to the city in 1901; they served the city for 35 years until the trolleybus network was expanded in 1936. The city's road network was improved between 1922 and 1932 when a new dual carriageway was built. Housing conditions also began to improve when the first council houses were built on new suburban estates. Trams were reintroduced after 68 years when a new network opened in 2004.

In the sporting world, Nottingham is home to the world's oldest professional football club, Notts County, which was formed in 1862. The town's other football club, Nottingham Forest, (under manager Brian Clough) had a period of success between 1977 and 1993; winning the First Division, four League Cups, a UEFA Super Cup and two European Cups. During this time Forest signed Trevor Francis, Britain's first £1million footballer, who joined the club in February 1979 from Birmingham City.

In 1980, Nottingham born ice dancers Torvill and Dean won Gold medals at the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo. Their performance is the only one to have obtained a perfect 6.0 score from all on the judging panel. The pair went on to gain numerous gold medals, including at the World Figure Skating Championships, European Figure Skating Championships and the British Figure Skating Championships. More recently the pair have appeared as coaches on the TV program Dancing on Ice.

The city was the site of race riots in 1958, centred on the St Ann's neighbourhood.

During the second half of the 20th century Nottingham saw urban growth with the development of new public and private housing estates and new urban centres, which have engulfed former rural villages such as Bilborough, Wollaton, Gedling and Bramcote. South of the river there has also been expansion with new areas such as Edwalton and West Bridgford, adding to Nottingham's urban sprawl. Although this growth slowed towards the end of the century, the modern pressures for more affordable and council housing is back on the political agenda and there is now pressure on the Green Belt which surrounds the city.

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