Place:Manitoba, Canada

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NameManitoba
Alt namesMB
Province de Manitobasource: NIMA, GEOnet Names Server (1996-1998)
Man.source: Wikipedia
TypeProvince
Coordinates55°N 97°W
Located inCanada     (1870 - )
Contained Places
Unknown
Headingly
Middlechurch
St John
St Pauls
Cemetery
St. Mary's Cemetery
Census division
Lisgar
Former village
Alt Bergthal
Bergfeld
Bergthal
Blumengart
Blumenhof
Blumenort
Blumstein
Chortitz
Edenburg
Gnadenfeld
Gnadenfeld
Grünthal
Heuboden
Hochstadt
Hochstadt
Hoffnungsfeld
Kronsgart
Neu Hoffnung
Neuendorf
Reichenbach
Rosenfeld
Rosengard
Rosenort
Rosenthal
Rosenthal
Schönau
Schöndorf
Schönfeld
Schönfeld
Schönhorst
Schönhorst
Schönsee
Schönthal
Schönthal
Schönwiese
Silberfeld
Weidenfeld
Ghost town
Bradburn
Inhabited place
Alexander
Altona
Amaranth
Amery
Anama Bay
Angusville
Arborg
Arden
Ashern
Austin
Bakers Narrows
Baldur
Barrows
Beauséjour
Belmont
Benito
Berens River
Binscarth
Birch River
Birtle
Bissett
Blumenfeld
Blumenort
Boissevain
Bowsman
Brandon ( 1860 - )
Brochet
Camperville
Carberry
Carman
Cartwright ( 1879 - )
Chortitz
Churchill
Clearwater
Cormorant
Cranberry Portage
Cross Lake
Crystal City
Cypress River
Darlingford
Darlington
Dauphin
Deloraine
Delta Beach
Dominion City
Douglas
Duck Bay
Dunrea
East Braintree
Elkhorn
Elm Creek
Elphinstone
Emerson
Erickson
Eriksdale
Ethelbert
Fertile
Fisher Branch
Flin Flon
Forrest
Gardenton
Gilbert Plains
Gillam
Gimli
Gladstone
Glenboro
Gnadenthal
Gods Lake
Goodlands
Grand Beach
Grand Rapids
Grandview
Great Falls
Gretna
Griswold
Grunthal
Gunton
Gypsumville
Halbstadt
Hamiota
Hartney
Haywood
Hecla
Herb Lake
Hodgson
Holland
Ilford
Inglis
Inwood
Island Lake
Jackhead Harbour
Killarney
Kississing
La Broquerie
Lakeview
Langruth
Laurier
Little Bullhead
Little Grand Rapids
Lockport
Lorette
Lundar
Lynn Lake
MacGregor
Mafeking
Magnet
Manigotagan
Manitou
Mather
Matheson Island
McAuley
McCreary
Melita
Methven
Miami
Middlebro
Miniota
Minitonas
Minnedosa
Minto
Moose Lake
Morden
Morris
Napinka
Neelin
Neepawa
Nelson House
Neuhorst
Ninette
Ninga
Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation
Niverville
Norway House
Notre Dame de Lourdes
Oak Lake
Oak Point
Oakbank
Oakburn
Oakville
Ochre River
Optic Lake
Otterburne
Oxford House
Pelican Rapids
Pikwitonei
Pilot Mound
Pine Falls
Pine River
Plum Coulee
Plumas
Poplar Point
Port Nelson
Portage la Prairie ( 1851 - )
Rapid City
Rathwell
Reinfeld
Reinland
Rennie
Reston
Richer
Ridgeville
Rivers
Riverton
Roblin
Roland
Rorketon
Rosengart
Rosenort
Rossburn
Rosser
Russell
Saint Claude
Saint Jean Baptiste
Saint Laurent
Saint Pierre-Jolys
Sainte Agathe
Sainte Anne
Sainte Rose du Lac
Sainte-Amélie
Schanzenfeld
Selkirk
Shamattawa
Sherridon
Shoal Lake
Sifton
Sipiwesk
Skownan
Snow Lake
Somerset
Sommerfeld
Souris
South Indian Lake
Sprague
Springfield
St Laurent
St. Lazare
Starbuck
Steep Rock
Steinbach
Stonewall
Strathclair
Swan Lake
Swan River
Teulon
The Pas
Thibaudeau
Thicket Portage
Thompson
Thornhill
Treherne
Victoria Beach
Virden
Vita
Wabowden
Waskada
Waugh
Wawanesa
Weir River
Westbourne
Whitemouth
Winkler
Winnipeg Beach
Winnipeg ( 1738 - )
Winnipegosis
Wolsely
Woodridge
York Factory
Municipality
Posen ( - 1898 )
Roblin (municipality)
South Cypress
Parish
East Selkirk
Place
Burnside
St Agathe
Rural municipality
Albert
Argyle
Armstrong
Arthur
Assiniboia
Brenda
Cameron
Cartier
Clanwilliam
Cornwallis
De Salaberry
Dufferin
Edward
Elton
Glenwood
Grey
Hanover
Langford
Lansdowne
Louise
Montcalm
Morris (RM)
Morton
North Norfolk
Oakland
Odanah
Pembina
Pipestone
Rhineland ( 1880 - )
Riverside
Saskatchewan
Shellmouth
South Norfolk
St. Andrews
St. Clements
Stanley
Strathcona
Turtle Mountain
Victoria
Wallace
West St. Paul
Winchester
Woodworth
Unincorporated area
Beaumont
Carroll
Fort Churchill
Holmfield
Unknown
Alonsa
Arizona
Arnaud
Ashville
Basswood
Beaver
Beresford
Bifrost
Birnie
Blanshard
Bonnie Doon
Boulton
Brandon Hills
Broad Valley
Brokenhead
Brookdale
Brunkild
Bunclody
Cardale
Clandeboye
Crandall
Culross
Dallas
Deerwood
Dropmore
Duck Mountain
Dugald
Eddystone
Eden
Elgin
Fannystelle
Fisher Bay
Fisherton
Fort Alexander
Foxwarren
Garland
Garson
Geyser
Glenella
Glenn
Glenora
Grande-Clairière
Gull Harbour
Harding
Hargrave
Hilton
Hnausa
Horndean
Howardville
Ingelow
Isabella
Katrime
Kelwood
Kemnay
Keyes
Kildonan
La Rivière
Lac du Bonnet
Lake Francis
Lauder
Lenore
Little Britain
Lorne
Lower Fort Garry
Lowland
Lyleton
Macdonald
Makinak
Mariapolis
Marney
McMunn
Meleb
Mentmore
Moosehorn
Myrtle
Newdale
Oak Bluff
Oak River
Oberon
Ostenfeld
Pinawa
Polonia
Poplarfield
Powerview
Prairie Grove
Riding Mountain
Rockwood
Rosebank
Rossendale
Sandy Lake
Shell River
Sidney
Snowflake
Solsgirth
St. Alphonse
St. Boniface
St. Eustache
St. François Xavier
St. Georges
St. James
St. Joseph
St. Leon
St. Norbert
St. Pierre
St. Vital
Stony Mountain
Stuartburn
Sylvan
Terence
Tilston
Transcona
Tremaine
Two Creeks
Tyndall
Vidir
Wellwood
Whitehead
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Manitoba is a Canadian prairie province. The province, with an area of , has a largely continental climate, with thousands of lakes and many rivers. Agriculture, mostly concentrated in the fertile southern and western parts of the province, is vital to the province's economy; other major industries are transportation, manufacturing, mining, forestry, energy, and tourism.

Manitoba's capital and largest city, Winnipeg, is Canada's eighth-largest Census Metropolitan Area, and home to 60 percent of the population of the province. Winnipeg is the seat of government, home to the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba and the highest court in the jurisdiction, the Manitoba Court of Appeal. Four of the province's five universities, all four of its professional sports teams, and most of its cultural activities are located in Winnipeg.

Fur traders first arrived during the late 17th century and Manitoba was the heart of Rupert's Land, owned by the Hudson's Bay Company. Manitoba became a province of Canada in 1870 after the Red River Rebellion. A general strike took place in Winnipeg in 1919, and the province was hit hard by the Great Depression. This led to the creation of what would become the New Democratic Party of Manitoba, one of the province's major political parties and currently in power, led by premier Greg Selinger.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

First Nations and European settlement

The geographical area of modern-day Manitoba was inhabited by the First Nations people shortly after the last ice age glaciers retreated in the southwest approximately 10,000 years ago; the first exposed land was the Turtle Mountain area. The Ojibwe, Cree, Dene, Sioux, Mandan, and Assiniboine peoples founded settlements, and other tribes entered the area to trade. In Northern Manitoba, quartz was mined to make arrowheads. The first farming in Manitoba was along the Red River, where corn and other seed crops were planted before contact with Europeans.


In 1611, Henry Hudson was one of the first Europeans to sail into what is now known as Hudson Bay, where he was abandoned by his crew. The first European to reach present-day central and southern Manitoba was Sir Thomas Button, who travelled upstream along the Nelson River to Lake Winnipeg in 1612 in an unsuccessful attempt to find and rescue Hudson. The Nonsuch, a British ship, sailed into Hudson Bay in 1668–1669, becoming the first trading vessel to reach the area; that voyage led to the formation of the Hudson's Bay Company, which was given absolute control of the entire Hudson Bay watershed by the British government. This watershed was named Rupert's Land, after Prince Rupert, who helped to subsidize the Hudson's Bay Company. York Factory was founded in 1684 after the original fort of the Hudson's Bay Company, Fort Nelson (built in 1682), was destroyed by rival French traders.

Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye, visited the Red River Valley in the 1730s to help open the area for French exploration and trade. As French explorers entered the area, a Montreal-based company, the North West Company, began trading with the Métis. Both the North West Company and the Hudson's Bay Company built fur-trading forts; the two companies competed in southern Manitoba, occasionally resulting in violence, until they merged in 1821 (the Hudson's Bay Company Archives in Winnipeg preserve the history of this era).[1]

Great Britain secured the territory in 1763 as a result of their victory over France in the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War, better known as the French and Indian War in North America; lasting from 1754 to 1763. The founding of the first agricultural community and settlements in 1812 by Lord Selkirk, north of the area which is now downtown Winnipeg, resulted in conflict between British colonists and the Métis. Twenty colonists, including the governor, and one Métis were killed in the Battle of Seven Oaks in 1816. Thomas Spence attempted to be President of the Republic of Manitobah in 1867, that he and his council named.

Confederation

Rupert's Land was ceded to Canada by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1869 and incorporated into the Northwest Territories; a lack of attention to Métis concerns caused Métis leader Louis Riel to establish a local provisional government as part of the Red River Rebellion. In response, Prime Minister John A. Macdonald introduced the Manitoba Act in the Canadian House of Commons, the bill was given Royal Assent and Manitoba was brought into Canada as a province in 1870. Louis Riel was pursued by British army officer Garnet Wolseley because of the rebellion, and Riel fled into exile. The Métis were blocked by the Canadian government in their attempts to obtain land promised to them as part of Manitoba's entry into confederation. Facing racism from the new flood of white settlers from Ontario, large numbers of Métis moved to what would become Saskatchewan and Alberta.[2]

Numbered Treaties were signed in the late 19th century with the chiefs of various First Nations that lived in the area. These treaties made specific promises of land for every family. As a result, a reserve system was established under the jurisdiction of the Federal Government. The prescribed amount of land promised to the native peoples was not always given; this led to efforts by aboriginal groups to assert rights to the land through aboriginal land claims, many of which are still ongoing.

The original province of Manitoba was a square one-eighteenth of its current size, and was known colloquially as the "postage stamp province". Its borders were expanded in 1881, but Ontario claimed a large portion of the land; the disputed portion was awarded to Ontario in 1889. Manitoba grew progressively, absorbing land from the Northwest Territories until it attained its current size by reaching 60°N in 1912.[3]

The Manitoba Schools Question showed the deep divergence of cultural values in the territory. The Catholic Franco-Manitobans had been guaranteed a state-supported separate school system in the original constitution of Manitoba, but a grassroots political movement among English Protestants from 1888 to 1890 demanded the end of French schools. In 1890, the Manitoba legislature passed a law removing funding for French Catholic schools. The French Catholic minority asked the federal government for support; however, the Orange Order and other anti-Catholic forces mobilized nationwide to oppose them.

The federal Conservatives proposed remedial legislation to override Manitoba, but they were blocked by the Liberals, led by Wilfrid Laurier, who opposed the remedial legislation because of his belief in provincial rights.[4] Once elected Prime Minister in 1896, Laurier implemented a compromise stating that Catholics in Manitoba could have their own religious instruction for 30 minutes at the end of the day if there were enough students to warrant it, implemented on a school-by-school basis.[4]

Modern era

By 1911, Winnipeg was the third largest city in Canada, and remained so until overtaken by Vancouver in the 1920s. A boomtown, it grew quickly around the start of the 20th century, with outside investors and immigrants contributing to its success. The drop in growth in the second half of the decade was a result of the opening of the Panama Canal in 1914, which reduced reliance on transcontinental railways for trade, as well as a decrease in immigration due to the outbreak of the First World War. Over 18,000 Manitoba residents enlisted in the first year of the war; by the end of the war, 14 Manitobans had received the Victoria Cross.

After the First World War ended, severe discontent among farmers (over wheat prices) and union members (over wage rates) resulted in an upsurge of radicalism, coupled with a polarization over the rise of Bolshevism in Russia. The most dramatic result was the Winnipeg General Strike of 1919. It began on 15 May and collapsed on 25 June 1919; as the workers gradually returned to their jobs, the Central Strike Committee decided to end the movement.

Government efforts to violently crush the strike, including a Royal Northwest Mounted Police charge into a crowd of protesters that resulted in multiple casualties and one death, had led to the arrest of the movement's leaders.[5] In the aftermath, eight leaders went on trial, and most were convicted on charges of seditious conspiracy, illegal combinations, and seditious libel; four were aliens who were deported under the Canadian Immigration Act.

The Great Depression (1929–c.1939) hit especially hard in Western Canada, including Manitoba. The collapse of the world market combined with a steep drop in agricultural production due to drought led to economic diversification, moving away from a reliance on wheat production. The Manitoba Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, forerunner to the New Democratic Party of Manitoba (NDP), was founded in 1932.

Canada entered the Second World War in 1939. Winnipeg was one of the major commands for the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan to train fighter pilots, and there were air training schools throughout Manitoba. Several Manitoba-based regiments were deployed overseas, including Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. In an effort to raise money for the war effort, the Victory Loan campaign organized "If Day" in 1942. The event featured a simulated Nazi invasion and occupation of Manitoba, and eventually raised over C$65 million.


Winnipeg was inundated during the 1950 Red River Flood and had to be partially evacuated. In that year, the Red River reached its highest level since 1861 and flooded most of the Red River Valley. The damage caused by the flood led then-Premier Duff Roblin to advocate for the construction of the Red River Floodway; it was completed in 1968 after six years of excavation. Permanent dikes were erected in eight towns south of Winnipeg, and clay dikes and diversion dams were built in the Winnipeg area. In 1997, the "Flood of the Century" caused over in damages in Manitoba, but the floodway prevented Winnipeg from flooding.

In 1990, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney attempted to pass the Meech Lake Accord, a series of constitutional amendments to persuade Quebec to endorse the Canada Act 1982. Unanimous support in the legislature was needed to bypass public consultation. Manitoba politician Elijah Harper, a Cree, opposed because he did not believe First Nations had been adequately involved in the Accord's process, and thus the Accord failed.

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Manitoba. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.