Place:County Wicklow, Republic of Ireland

Watchers
NameCounty Wicklow
Alt namesCo. Wicklow
Cill Mhantáinsource: Encyclopædia Britannica (1988) XII, 647
Contae Chill Mhantáinsource: Wikipedia
Wicklowsource: Getty Vocabulary Program
TypeCounty
Coordinates53°N 6.5°W
Located inRepublic of Ireland     (1922 - )
Also located inIreland     ( - 1922)
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

County Wicklow is a county in Ireland. It is part of the Mid-East Region and is also located in the province of Leinster. It is named after the town of Wicklow, which derives from the Old Norse name Víkingalág or Wykynlo. Wicklow County Council is the local authority for the county. The population of the county is 136,640 according to the 2011 census.


Wicklow is colloquially known as the Garden of Ireland. It is the 17th largest of Ireland's 32 counties by area, being thirty-three miles in length by twenty miles in breadth, and 15th largest by population. It is the fourth largest of Leinster's 12 counties by size and the fifth largest in terms of population. Between 2006 and 2011 the population of the county grew between 5–10%

The boundaries of the county were extended in 1957 by the Local Government Act which "detached lands from the County of Dublin and from the jurisdiction and powers of the Council of the County of Dublin" near Bray and added them to the County of Wicklow. The adjoining counties are Wexford to the south, Carlow to the south-west, Kildare to the west and Dublin to the north.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

County Wicklow was the last of the traditional counties of Ireland to be shired in 1606 from land previously part of counties Dublin and Carlow. Established as a distinct county, it was aimed at controlling local groups such as the O'Byrnes. The Military Road, stretching from Rathfarnham to Aghavannagh crosses the mountains, north to south, was built by the British army to assist them in defeating the rebels still active in the Wicklow Mountains following the failed 1798 rebellion. It provided them with access to an area that had been a hotbed of Irish rebellion for centuries. Several barracks to house the soldiers were built along the route and the Glencree Centre for Peace and Reconciliation was built alongside the remains of barracks there. Battalions of the Irish Army use firing ranges in County Wicklow for tactical exercises, especially the largest one in the Glen of Imaal which was previously used by the British Army prior to independence. The ancient monastery of Glendalough is located in County Wicklow. During the Cromwellian invasion of Ireland, local authorities immediately surrendered without a fight. During the 1798 rebellion, some of the insurgents took refuge in the Wicklow Mountains, resulting in clashes between British troops and the troops commanded by General Joseph Holt (1756–1826) near Aughrim and later at Arklow. A Military Road was built through the territory of the county to open it up to British troops for quick access to the Irish rebels in the Wicklow Mountains in the early 1800s.

For more information, see the EN Wikipedia article County Wicklow. especially the section "Geography and political subdivisions" and its subsection "Towns and villages"

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