Place:County Limerick, Republic of Ireland

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NameCounty Limerick
Alt namesCounty Limerick
Contae Luimnighsource: Wikipedia
Limericksource: Getty Vocabulary Program
Luimneachsource: Encyclopedia Britannica Online (2002-) "Limerick," accessed 21 Oct. 2003
TypeCounty
Coordinates52.5°N 8.75°W
Located inRepublic of Ireland     (1922 - )
Also located inIreland     ( - 1922)
Contained Places
Unknown
Bruss
Cemetery
Mount Saint Lawrence Cemetery
Inhabited place
Abbeyfeale
Adare
Ardagh
Askeaton
Athea
Ballingarry
Ballyneety
Broadford ( 1922 - )
Bruff
Bruree
Caherdavin
Cappamore
Castelconnell
Castletroy
Croom
Dromcolliher
Foynes
Galbally
Garryspillane
Glin
Hospital
Kilfinnane
Knocklong
Limerick ( 800 - )
Newcastle West
Oola
Pallas Grean
Pallasgreen
Pallaskenry
Patrickswell
Rathkeale
Tuarnafola
Unknown
Abington
Aglishcormick
Anhid
Ardcanny
Ardpatrick
Athlacca
Athneasy
Ballinard
Ballingaddy
Ballingarry (Coshlea Barony)
Ballinlough
Ballybrood
Ballycahane
Ballylanders
Ballynaclogh
Ballynamona
Ballyscaddan
Caheravally
Caherconlish
Cahercorney
Caherelly
Cahernarry
Cappagh
Carrigparson
Castletown
Chapelrussell
Clonagh
Cloncagh
Cloncrew
Clonelty
Clonkeen
Clonshire
Colmanswell
Corcomohide
Crecora
Croagh
Darragh
Derrygalvin
Donaghmore
Doon
Doondonnell
Drehidtarsna
Dromin
Dromkeen
Dunmoylan
Dysert
Effin
Emlygrennan
Fedamore
Glenogra
Grange
Grean
Hackmys
Inch St. Lawrence
Iveruss
Kilbeheny
Kilbradran
Kilbreedy-major
Kilbreedy-minor
Kilcolman
Kilcornan
Kilcullane
Kildimo
Kilfergus
Kilfinny
Kilflyn
Kilfrush
Kilkeedy
Killagholehane
Killeedy
Killeely
Killeenagarriff
Killeenoghty
Killonahan
Kilmeedy
Kilmoylan
Kilmurry
Kilpeacon
Kilquane
Kilscannell
Kilteely
Knockainy
Knocknagaul
Lismakeery
Loghill
Ludden
Mahoonagh
Monagay
Monasteranenagh
Morgans
Mungret
Nantinan
Newcastle
Particles
Rathjordan
Rathronan
Robertstown
Rochestown
Shanagolden
St. John's
St. Lawrence's
St. Mary's
St. Michael's
St. Munchin's
St. Nicholas'
St. Patrick's
St. Peter's & St. Paul's
Stradbally
Tankardstown
Templebredon
Tomdeely
Tullabracky
Tuogh
Tuoghcluggin
Uregare
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

County Limerick is a county in Ireland. It is located in the Mid-West Region and is also part of the province of Munster. It is named after the city of Limerick. Limerick County Council is the local council for the county. The county's population at the 2011 census 134,703.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

It is thought that humans had established themselves in the Lough Gur area of the county as early as 3000 BC, while megalithic remains found at Duntryleague date back further to 3500 BC. The arrival of the Celts around 400 BC brought about the division of the county into petty kingdoms or túatha.

From the 4th to the 12th century, the ancient kingdom of the Uí Fidgenti was approximately co-extensive with what is now County Limerick, with some of the easternmost part the domain of the Eóganacht Áine. Having finally lost an over two-century-long conflict with the neighbouring O'Briens of Dál gCais, most of the rulers fled for County Kerry and soon after that County Cork. Their lands were almost immediately occupied by the FitzGeralds and other Norman families, who permanently prevented their return. The ancestors of both Michael Collins and the famous O'Connells of Derrynane were among these princes of the Uí Fidgenti. The Norse-Irish O'Donovans, descendants of the notorious Donnubán mac Cathail, were the leading family at the time and were responsible for the conflict.

The precise ethnic affiliation of the Uí Fidgenti is lost to history and all that is known for sure is that they were cousins of the equally shadowy Uí Liatháin of early British fame. Officially both are said to be related to the Eóganachta but a variety of evidence suggests associations with the Dáirine and Corcu Loígde, and thus distantly the infamous Ulaid of ancient Ulster. In any case, it is supposed the Uí Fidgenti still make a substantial contribution to the population of the central and western regions of County Limerick. Their capital was Dún Eochair, the great earthworks of which still remain and can be found close to the modern town of Bruree, on the River Maigue. Catherine Coll, the mother of Éamon de Valera, was a native of Bruree and this is where he was taken by her brother to be raised.

Christianity came to Limerick in the 5th Century, and resulted in the establishment of important monasteries in Limerick, at Ardpatrick, Mungret and Kileedy. From this golden age in Ireland of learning and art (5th – 9th Centuries) comes one of Ireland's greatest artefacts, The Ardagh Chalice, a masterpiece of metalwork, which was found in a west Limerick fort in 1868.

The arrival of the Vikings in the 9th century brought about the establishment of the city on an island on the River Shannon in 922. The death of Domnall Mór Ua Briain, King of Munster in 1194 resulted in the invading Normans taking control of Limerick, and in 1210, the County of Limerick was formally established. Over time, the Normans became "more Irish than the Irish themselves" as the saying goes. The Tudors in England wanted to curb the power of these Gaelicised Norman Rulers and centralise all power in their hands, so they established colonies of English in the county. This caused the leading Limerick Normans, The Geraldines, to revolt against English Rule in 1569. This sparked a savage war in Munster known as the Desmond Rebellions, during which the province was laid to waste, and the confiscation of the vast estates of the Geraldines.

The county was to be further ravaged by war over the next century. After the Irish Rebellion of 1641, Limerick city was taken in a siege by Catholic general Garret Barry in 1642. The county was not fought over for most of the Irish Confederate Wars, of 1641–53, being safely behind the front lines of the Catholic Confederate Ireland. However it became a battleground during the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland in 1649–53. The invasion of the forces of Oliver Cromwell in the 1650s included a twelve-month siege of the city by Cromwell's New Model Army led by Henry Ireton. The city finally surrendered in October 1651. One of Cromwell's generals, Hardress Waller was granted lands at Castletown near Kilcornan in County Limerick. During the Williamite War in Ireland (1689–1691) the city was to endure two further sieges, one in 1690 and another in 1691. It was during the 1690 siege that the infamous destruction of the Williamite guns at Ballyneety, near Pallasgreen was carried out by General Patrick Sarsfield. The Catholic Irish, comprising the vast majority of the population, had eagerly supported the Jacobite cause, however, the second siege of Limerick resulted in a defeat to the Williamites. Sarsfield managed to force the Williamites to sign the Treaty of Limerick, the terms of which were satisfactory to the Irish. However the Treaty was subsequently dishonoured by the English and the city became known as the City of the Broken Treaty.

The 18th and 19th centuries saw a long period of persecution against the Catholic majority, many of who lived in poverty. In spite of this oppression, however, the famous Maigue Poets strove to keep alive their ancient Gaelic Poetry in towns like Croom and Bruree. The Great Famine of the 1840s set in motion mass emigration and a huge decline in Irish as a spoken language in the county. This began to change around the beginning of the 20th century, as changes in law from the British Government enabled the farmers of the county to purchase lands they had previously only held as tenants, paying high rent to absentee landlords.

Limerick saw much fighting during the War of Independence of 1919 to 1921 particularly in the east of the county. The subsequent Irish Civil War saw bitter fighting between the newly established Irish Free State soldiers and IRA "Irregulars", especially in the city (See Irish Free State offensive).

For more information, see the EN Wikipedia article County Limerick. especially the section "Geography and political subdivisions" and its subsection "Towns and villages"

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at County Limerick. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.