Place:Bayswater, London, England

Watchers
NameBayswater
TypeArea
Coordinates51.5095°N 0.193°W
Located inLondon, England     (1889 - 1965)
Also located inMiddlesex, England     ( - 1889)
See alsoPaddington, London, Englandparish and metropolitan borough in which it was located prior to 1965
Westminster (London Borough), Greater London, EnglandLondon borough covering part of the area since 1965
Kensington and Chelsea (London Borough), Greater London, EnglandLondon borough covering part of the area since 1965
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Bayswater is an area within the City of Westminster and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in central London. It is a built-up district located 3 miles (4.8 km) west-north-west of Charing Cross, bordering the north of Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens and having a population density of 17,500 per square kilometre.

Bayswater is one of London's most cosmopolitan areas, wherein a diverse local population is augmented by a high concentration of hotels. In addition to the native English, there is a significant Arab population towards Edgware Road, a large Greek community (attracted by St Sophia's Cathedral, Moscow Road – London's Greek Orthodox Cathedral), many U.S. people and London's biggest Brazilian community.

The area has attractive streets and garden squares lined with Victorian stucco terraces, mostly now subdivided into flats and boarding houses. The property ranges from very expensive apartments to small studio flats. There are also purpose-built apartment blocks dating from the inter-war period as well as more recent developments, and a large council estate, the 650-flat Hallfield Estate, designed by Sir Denys Lasdun and now largely sold off.

Queensway and Westbourne Grove are its busiest main streets, both having many ethnic-cuisine restaurants.

A nineteenth century description

A Vision of Britain through Time provides the following description of Bayswater from John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales of 1870-72:

"BAYSWATER, a suburb of London, and a chapelry in Paddington parish and Marylebone borough, Middlesex. The suburb adjoins Hyde Park, Kensington Gardens, and the Great Western railway, 3 miles W of St. Paul's; and has a post-office under London W, and a [railway] station. It was called originally Baynard's water; and it took the first part of its name from Baynard, an associate of William the Conqueror, who held it of Westminster abbey, and the second part from copious springs which long supplied the greater part of the metropolis with water. The same Baynard gave his name to Baynard Castle, now extinct, and to the ward of Castle-Baynard. The suburb is now a fashionable, richly-built part of London: and contains some fine streets, terraces. crescents, and squares, of recent erection. The extensive tea-gardens belonging to the famous herbalist, Sir John Hill, satirized by Garrick, were here. St. George's burial-ground, fronting Hyde Park, contains the graves of Lawrence Sterne, Sir Thomas Picton, and Mrs. Radcliffe.
"The chapelry bears the name of St. Matthews Bayswater, and was constituted in 1858. Population: 5,513. Houses: 783. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of London. Value: not reported. Patron: the Rev.Smalley. A United Presbyterian church was built at Westbourne-grove, in 1862, after designs by W. G. Habershow, and consists of naive, aisles, and transept, in the decorated English style, with tower and spire. A lecture-hall was built in the same locality, in 1861, after designs by A. Billing, and exhibits a highly embellished facade of four stories in the Venetian renaissance style. The hall itself is in the rear; measures 70 feet in length, 30 in width, and 27 in height; and is lighted from above."

Westbourne Grove is another neighbourhood covering the western part of Bayswater.

Middlesex Research Tips

Parts of Middlesex were absorbed into London in 1889 (Inner London), and some in 1965 (Outer London). Depending on the specific location and the year being investigated it may be necessary to check London records as well as those of Middlesex.

  • See wiki.familysearch.org under "Middlesex" for key information about the jurisdictions and records of Middlesex, plus links to indexes, reference aids and Family History Library holdings.
  • The London Metropolitan Archives (40 Northampton Road, Clerkenwell, London EC1R 0HB) holds records relating to the whole of Greater London. Ancestry (subscription necessary) has produced transcriptions and provides images of lists of baptisms, marriages, and burials in churches across Greater London. These lists start in 1813 and stretch into the 20th century.
  • The Victoria History of the County of Middlesex is a series of volumes available online through British History Online. The volumes were written over the past hundred or so years by a number of authors and cover various sections of Middlesex. A list of the volumes and what each contains can be found under the source Victoria History of the County of Middlesex
  • GENUKI has a long list of websites and archive holders in addition to London Metropolitan Archives above. (The list from GENUKI is not maintained so well that there is never a dead link in it. However, it is often worth googling the title given on the page just in case the contributor has reorganized their website.)
  • GENUKI has a separate page for Middlesex references.
  • GENUKI also has a list of the Archives and Local Studies Libraries for each of the boroughs of Greater London.
  • Registration Districts in Middlesex and Registration Districts in London, are lists of the registration districts used for civil registration (births, marriages and deaths, as well as the censuses). There are linked supporting lists of the parishes which made up each registration district, the dates of formation and abolition of the districts, the General Register Office numbers, and the local archive-holding place. This work has been carried out by Brett Langston under the agency of GENUKI (Genealogy United Kingdom and Ireland) and UKBMD - Births, Marriages, Deaths & Censuses on the Internet.

Greater London Research Tips

  • See wiki.familysearch.org under "London" and also under "Middlesex", "Surrey" and "Kent" for key information about Greater London's jurisdictions and records, plus links to indexes, reference aids and Family History Library holdings.
  • The London Metropolitan Archives (40 Northampton Road, Clerkenwell, London EC1R 0HB) holds records relating to the whole of Greater London. Ancestry (subscription necessary) has produced transcriptions and provides images of lists of baptisms, marriages, and burials in churches across Greater London. These lists start in 1813 and stretch into the 20th century.
  • GENUKI has a long list of websites and archive holders in addition to London Metropolitan Archives above. (The list from GENUKI is not maintained so well that there is never a dead link in it. However, it is often worth googling the title given on the page just in case the contributor has reorganized their website.)
  • GENUKI also has a list of the Archives and Local Studies Libraries for each of the boroughs of Greater London.
  • The London Encyclopaedia by Ben Weinreb and Christopher Hibbert. An e-book available online through Google, originally published by Pan Macmillan. There is a search box in the left-hand pane.
  • London Lives. A very useful free website for anyone researching their London ancestors between the years 1690-1800. This is a fully searchable edition of 240,000 manuscripts from eight archives and fifteen datasets, giving access to 3.35 million names.
  • London Ancestor, a website belonging to one of the London family history societies, has a list of transcriptions of directories from the 18th century, listing in one case "all the squares, streets, lanes, courts, yards, alleys, &C. in and about Five Miles of the Metropolis..." In other parts of the same website are maps of various parts of 19th century London and Middlesex.
  • The proceedings of the Old Bailey, London's central criminal court, 1674-1913. A fully searchable edition of the largest body of texts detailing the lives of non-elite people ever published, containing 197,745 criminal trials held at London's central criminal court. This website is free to use.
  • Registration Districts in London, Registration Districts in Middlesex, Registration Districts in Surrey, Registration Districts in Kent, are lists of the registration districts used for civil registration (births, marriages and deaths, as well as the censuses). There are linked supporting lists of the parishes which made up each registration district, the dates of formation and abolition of the districts, the General Register Office numbers, and the local archive-holding place. This work has been carried out by Brett Langston under the agency of GENUKI (Genealogy United Kingdom and Ireland) and UKBMD - Births, Marriages, Deaths & Censuses on the Internet.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Bayswater. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.