Person:Thomas Benedict (8)

m. 8 Oct 1609
  1. William Benedict1612 - 1615
  2. Thomas Benedict1617 - 1689/90
  • HThomas Benedict1617 - 1689/90
  • WMary Bridgham1618 - abt 1718
m. abt 1639
  1. Thomas Benedictest 1640 - 1688
  2. John Benedictest 1645 -
  3. Samuel Benedictest 1647 - abt 1719
  4. James Benedict1649/50 -
  5. Elizabeth Benedictest 1652 -
  6. Mary Benedictest 1654 - abt 1693
  7. Lieut. Daniel Benedictest 1656 -
  8. Sarah Benedictest 1658 -
  9. Rebecca Benedictabt 1660 -
Facts and Events
Name Thomas Benedict
Gender Male
Christening[1] 30 Nov 1617 Long Stratton, Norfolk, EnglandSt. Michael
Immigration[4][5] abt 1637 New England
Marriage abt 1639 to Mary Bridgham
Death[2][3] Mar 1689/90 Norwalk, Fairfield, Connecticut, United States

Contents

Disproven Lineage

The initial genealogy of the family of Thomas Benedict (which has him descended from 3 generations of William Benedicts) relied heavily on the supposed testimony of Mary (Brigham) Benedict as told to her grandson, James Benedict of Ridgefield, CT that he then published in 1755. This information was repeated in Henry Marvin Benedict's 1870 book Genealogy of the Benedicts in America, before more recent researchers[1][9] delved into this more deeply, and discovered that while his father's name was Wiliam, the 2 previous generations were both named George.

For a time, it was believed that there was a close connection to the Hunlock family. In 1901, Henry Waters published, in "Genealogical Gleanings in England," the will of Henry Hunloke (Hunlock) of Wingerworth, Derbyshire. This 1610 will mentions bequests to "my loving son, William Benedeke and to my daughter, Ann Benedeke." Research published in 1915 by Benjamin Lincoln Benedict of Burlington, Vermont provided the basic details, as perceived at that time, concerning the Hunloke family and their possible relationship to the Benedict family. An article by Roberta B. Pierson, published in 1994, shows that the will does not point to a marriage between a Hunlock and a Benedict, but rather, to the marriage between Thomas' great-uncle William Benedict and Henry Hunlock's step-daughter Judith Marsh.[10]

Robert A. Benedict at Benedict Topics, citing an article by Larue Olsen in the CT. Nutmegger, makes a sound case for the origins cited below.

Origins

30 Nov 1617: Baptized at Stratton St Michael, Norfolk, England; son of William Benedict and Elizabeth Stephin or Stephanson

Late May-June 1637: Sailed from Great Yarmouth, England, on the "Mary and Anne" with Mary Bridgham, his step-sister

Life in Colonial America

1639/40: Married to Mary Bridgham, probably at Salem by Rev. John Youngs, probable mentor for Thomas and Mary Benedict

Late 1639, early 1640: Left the Salem area, probably with a group led by Rev. John Youngs[5], and settled at Southold on Long Island, where in 1649, with 3 others, he bought a farm called Hashamomack[6].

1639-1656: At Southold/Hashamomack, with Mary Bridgham, he fathered most or all of their five sons and four daughters.

1656-1662: Huntington, Long Island

1662-1665: Jamaica, Long Island

1665: Removed to Norwalk, Connecticut where he was elected town clerk; also represented Norwalk at General Assemply in Hartford. Served as selectman.

Occupation

Thomas could read and write, and was not likely a weaver, as suggested by the earliest written genealogy[7].

Legacy

28 Feb 1689/90: Wrote his will

18 Mar 1689/90: Inventory of his estate taken.

Somewhere in between, he died. His death and burial are unrecorded.

References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Olsen, LaRue. The English Origins of the First Thomas Benedict of Long Island and Norwalk, Connecticut. Connecticut Nutmegger (Connecticut Society of Genealogists). (2006), 39:359.

    'Thomas Benedict ([son of] William Benedicke, [son of] George, [son of] George) was christened 30 November 1617 at St. Michael, Long Stratton, Norfolk [citing St. Michael, Long Stratton Parish Register]. He married about 1639, his stepsister Mary Bridgham a.k.a. Bridgum, daughter of John Bridgham and Grace (_____). He died about 1689/90 at Norwalk, Connecticut, U.S.A. [citing The Genealogy of the Benedicts in America (1870)].'

  2. Torrey, Clarence Almon. New England Marriages Prior to 1700, page 61.

    'BENEDICT, Thomas1 (1617-1690) & Mary [BRIDGUM]?; ca 1641; Southold, LI/Norwalk, CT'

  3. Benedict, Henry Marvin. The genealogy of the Benedicts in America. (Albany, NY: J. Munsell, 1870), pages 18-19.

    'No record can be found that indicates the day of death; ... his Will was executed the "eight and twentieth feb.r. ano dominy 1689-90." An Inventory of his Estate, in which he is described as "late deceased," was taken on the 18th of March in the same year; it is therefore quite certain that he died, at Norwalk, in the interval between those two dates.'

  4. Benedict, Henry Marvin. The genealogy of the Benedicts in America. (Albany, NY: J. Munsell, 1870), page 2.

    'These facts in the history of Thomas Benedict are verified by the testimony of Mary Bridgum herself, who lived to the age of one hundred years, and in her life-time communicated them to her grandson, Deacon James Benedict, of Ridgefield, Conn., who recorded them in 1755. "... Now this Thomas was put out an apprentice to a weaver, who afterwards, in the 21st year of his age, came over into New-England, together with his sister-in-law [step-sister] Mary Bridgum. Afterwards said Thomas was joined in marriage with Mary Bridgum. ...[Signed] JAMES BENEDICT. Ridgefield, March [th]e 14, 1755." '

  5. 5.0 5.1 Olsen, LaRue. The English Origins of the First Thomas Benedict of Long Island and Norwalk, Connecticut. Connecticut Nutmegger (Connecticut Society of Genealogists). (2006), 39:359-60.

    '... The ship ["Mary & Anne"] left Great Yarmouth on a night in May, 1637, without authorization, arriving in Boston on June 20. Thomas Benedict and Mary Bridgham are not listed among the passengers of that ship, nor were a number of others related to known passengers, all later to be found with the Younges contingent at Southold. This group left Boston, were in Salem by August 1637 and then traveled somewhat later to Southold. ... Thomas and Mary, with the John Younges family and others, made the trek to Southold where they staked their claim at Hashamonmack section. There, Thomas built a tide mill, the first English mill in New York. This would have been about 1639-1640 (exact date unknown).'

  6. Benedict, Henry Marvin. The genealogy of the Benedicts in America. (Albany, NY: J. Munsell, 1870), pages 2, 4-5, 8, 14-15.

    p. 2: 'Soon after their arrival they were married, and finding the society and institutions of Massachusetts Bay congenial, they resided in the colony for a time. These facts in the history of Thomas Benedict are verified by the testimony of Mary Bridgum herself, who lived to the age of one hundred years, and in her life-time communicated them to her grandson, Deacon James Benedict, of Ridgefield, Conn., who recorded them in 1755. "... After they had lived some time in the Bay parts, they removed to Southold on Long Island, where were born unto them five sons and four daughters, ... From thence they removed to a farm belonging to the town, called Hassamamac, where they lived some time. From thence they removed to Huntingtown, where they lived some years, Then they removed to Jamaica on said Island, where Thomas, their eldest son took to wife Mary Messenger, of that town. And last of all, they removed to Norwalk, in Fairfield county, Connecticut, with all their family, where they were all marred. ...[Signed] JAMES BENEDICT. Ridgefield, March [th]e 14, 1755." '

    pp. 4-5: 'It is certain, that in June, 1657, he was a resident of Huntington, which leaves little doubt that he was, early, an inhabitant of Southold, which was settled in 1640. In conjunction with three others, in 1649, he purchased a tract of land belonging to the town of Southold, called Hashamomack, .. This tract of land, though within a mile or two of Southold, was not technically, within its limits [until 1654, when it appears that it joined Southold - JB] ...'

    p. 8: Thomas Benedict was appointed to be a commissioner for Huntington in May 1662, and was voted a 'Home lot" in Jamaica in Dec. 1662.

    pp. 14-15: He was appointed ... lieutenant of "the Foot Company of Jamaica" ... April, 1665 .. in this same year, he is recorded as having been chosen town clerk of Norwalk, Ct. ... some confusion of dates [due to changes in the way that dates were recorded].'

  7. Olsen, LaRue. The English Origins of the First Thomas Benedict of Long Island and Norwalk, Connecticut. Connecticut Nutmegger (Connecticut Society of Genealogists). (2006), 39:361-62.

    'Some previous researchers believed that Thomas Benedict was a weaver when he lived in England. We believe this is unlikely, ...' This is followed by evidence for this position, including the fact that he could read and write, uncommon skills for the time.

  8.   Chronology of Thomas Benedict, in Benedict Topics.
  9. Update on Origins of Thomas Benedict, in Benedict Topics.
  10. A Hunlock-Benedict Relationship, in Benedict Topics.
  11.   Five Generations from George Benedict Sr, in Benedict Topics.