Person:Marguerite de Valois (1)

Marguerite de Valois
b.14 May 1553
d.27 May 1615 Paris, Paris, France
m. 28 Oct 1533
  1. François II de France1544 - 1560
  2. Élisabeth de France1545 - 1568
  3. Claude de France1547 - 1575
  4. Louis de France1549 - 1550
  5. Charles IX de France1550 - 1574
  6. Henri III de France1551 - 1589
  7. Marguerite de Valois1553 - 1615
  8. François de France, duc d'Alençon1555 - 1584
  9. Victoire de France1556 - 1556
  10. Jeanne de France1556 - 1556
m. 18 Aug 1572
Facts and Events
Name Marguerite de Valois
Gender Female
Birth[1][2] 14 May 1553
Marriage 18 Aug 1572 Paris, Paris, Franceto Henry IV , de France
Death[1][2] 27 May 1615 Paris, Paris, France


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Margaret of France (French: Marguerite de France or Marguerite de Valois, 14 May 1553 – 27 March 1615) was Queen of France and of Navarre during the late sixteenth century. A royal princess of France by birth, she was the last of the House of Valois.

She was the daughter of King Henry II of France and Catherine de' Medici and the sister of Kings Francis II, Charles IX and Henry III and of Queen Elizabeth of Spain. She was queen twice for she had married King Henry III of Navarre who finally became King Henry IV of France.

Margaret, among other political manipulations, was subjected to an arranged marriage and being held prisoner (albeit at a castle) for many years. However, her life was anything but passive.

Aside from being twice a queen—first of Navarre (1572), then of France (1589), Margaret was famous for her beauty and sense of style (she was one of the most fashionable women of her time, influencing most of Europe's Royal Courts with her clothing). She was also a gifted poet and writer, notable for both her own scandalous behavior and for revealing that of others. Margaret took many lovers both during her marriage and after her annulment. The most well-known were Joseph Boniface de La Môle, Jacques de Harlay, Seigneur de Champvallon and Louis de Bussy d'Amboise. When imprisoned by her brother Henry III for eighteen years, she took advantage of the time to write her memoirs, which included a succession of stories relating to the disputes of her brothers Charles IX and Henry III with her husband Henry IV. The memoirs were published posthumously in 1628.

Her life has inspired a variety of stories over the centuries, beginning with Shakespeare's early comedy Love's Labour's Lost written during her lifetime, to Alexandre Dumas, père's 1845 novel La Reine Margot; to a 1994 movie La Reine Margot.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Marguerite de Valois. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Marguerite de Valois, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2. 2.0 2.1 Anselme (de Sainte-Marie). Histoire généalogique de la maison royale de France, des pairs et grands officiers de la Couronne. (Paris: la Compagnie des Libraires, 1726-1733), 1:136.