Person:John Brown (446)

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Rev. John Brown
b.ABT 1728 Ireland
  1. Rev. James Brown
  2. Janet Brownabt 1703 - ABT 1761
  3. Rev. John BrownABT 1728 - 1803
m. 1753
  1. Elizabeth Brown1755 - 1828
  2. Senator John Brown, Esq.1757 - 1837
  3. William Brown1759 - Abt 1759
  4. William Brown1760 -
  5. Mary Brown1763 -
  6. Sen. James Brown1766 - 1835
  7. Samuel Brown1769 - 1830
  8. David Brown1771 -
  9. Eben Brown1773 -
  10. Preston W. Brown1775 - 1826
Facts and Events
Name Rev. John Brown
Alt Name John Brown
Gender Male
Birth[1] ABT 1728 Ireland
Marriage 1753 Prob. Augusta County, Virginiato Margaret Preston
Death? 1803 Frankfort, Kentucky

Rev. John Brown was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

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Early Land Acquisition in Augusta County, VA

Image:BrownJohnRev.SE250acres.JPG

Rev. John Brown's land (Borden Tract SE, 250 acres, acquired from Thomas McMurray in 1755) as shown on the map meticulously drawn by J.R. Hildebrand, cartographer. This map is copyrighted©, used by permission of John Hildebrand, son of J.R. Hildebrand, April, 2009.


Acquisition of Land from Chalkley's:


  • Page 85.--21st May, 1755. Thomas McMurray to Rev. John Brown, 250 acres conveyed to Thomas by Borden, 27th February, 1750; corner John Patton in Borden's tract; corner George Stevenson in James Greenlee's line. Teste: George Stinson. Delivered: Thos. Bowyer, December, 1756.


Disposition of Land from Chalkley's:


  • Page 215.--16th December, 1777. Rev. John Brown and Margaret to George Gall, of Washington County, Maryland.


Records of Rev. John Brown in Augusta County, VA

From Chalkley's:


  • Page 258.--18th November, 1755. Borden's executors to Jacob Gray, £15. 10,450 acres, part of 92100. Cor. Rev. Jno. Brown, Houston's line.
  • Page 226.--19th December, 1771. Samuel Henderson and Jean to Michael Law, £60, 200 acres whereon said Law now lives; James Greenlee's line; corner to Rev. John Brown; John Stephenson's line; corner Thomas Paxton. Teste: Samuel Patterson, William Patton, James Patterson.

Information on Rev. John Brown

http://members.tripod.com/~labach/jnobrown.htm#i851


First Generation 1. John1 Brown, son of James Brown and Jennet Stevenson, was born in Ireland circa 1728. John died 1803 in Frankfort, KY, at 75 years of age. His body was interred in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, KY.

He married Margaret Preston in Augusta Co., VA, ca 1754. Margaret was born in Ireland ca 1728. Margaret was the daughter of John Preston and Elizabeth Patton. Margaret died 1802 in Kentucky, at 74 years of age. Her body was interred in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, KY. At 27 years of age Margaret became the mother of Elizabeth Brown December 4, 1755. At 29 years of age Margaret became the mother of James Brown September 12, 1757. At 29 years of age Margaret became the mother of John Brown in near Staunton, VA, September 12, 1757. At 31 years of age Margaret became the mother of William Brown November 22, 1759. At 32 years of age Margaret became the mother of William Brown November 22, 1760. At 35 years of age Margaret became the mother of Mary Brown Augusta Co., VA, July 14, 1763. At 38 years of age Margaret became the mother of James Brown in near Staunton, VA, September 11, 1766. At 40 years of age Margaret became the mother of Samuel Brown in Rockbridge Co., VA, January 30, 1769. At 43 years of age Margaret became the mother of David Brown July 8, 1771. At 44 years of age Margaret became the mother of Eben Brown April 27, 1773. At 46 years of age Margaret became the mother of Preston W. Brown in Rockbridge Co., VA, January 15, 1775.

At 27 years of age John became the father of Elizabeth Brown December 4, 1755. At 29 years of age John became the father of James Brown September 12, 1757. At 29 years of age John became the father of John Brown in near Staunton, VA, September 12, 1757. At 31 years of age John became the father of William Brown November 22, 1759. At 32 years of age John became the father of William Brown November 22, 1760. At 35 years of age John became the father of Mary Brown Augusta Co., VA, July 14, 1763. At 38 years of age John became the father of James Brown in near Staunton, VA, September 11, 1766. At 40 years of age John became the father of Samuel Brown in Rockbridge Co., VA, January 30, 1769. At 43 years of age John became the father of David Brown July 8, 1771. At 44 years of age John became the father of Eben Brown April 27, 1773. At 46 years of age John became the father of Preston W. Brown in Rockbridge Co., VA, January 15, 1775. John Brown graduated from Princeton College in 1749. He was a Presbyterian mininster and served the New Providence Church in Rockbridge Co., VA for 44 years. In 1796 he retired and moved to Woodford County, Kentucky where he resided at an estate known as "Sumner's Forest" on the Shannon Run Pike. His biography from The Prestons of Smithfield and Greenfield in Virginia by John Frederick Dorman (The Filson Club, 1982) follows: John Bown was a graduate of Princeton College in 1749.[1] He was licensed by New Castle Presbytery and sent to the Valley of Virginia, where in 1753[2] he was called to Providence and Timber Ridge churches in Augusta County. He was ordained at Fagg's Manor, Chester Co., Pa., 11 Oct. 1753 and was one of the six ministers of the Presbytery of Hanover when it was formed in 1755.[3] On 25 Aug. 1756 he was one of the four appointed by Hanover Presbytery to transact business when the Presbytery could not meet.[4] He established a grammar school near his residence one-fourth mile north of the village of Fairfield in Augusta County. In 1774 the Presbytery of Hanover adopted this school and appointed William Graham teacher under Brown. In 1777 the school was transferred to Timber Ridge and later it was moved to Lexington. He was a trustee of this school, then known as Augusta Academy, from 1776 until 1782. From it developed Washington and Lee University.[5] About 1763 a difference took place between Brown and some of the leading men of the Timber Ridge congregation.[6] As a result, he resigned the ministerial charge of Timber Ridge in Oct. 1767 and thereafter confined his labors to New Providence Church.[7] Many of the Timber Ridge members retained such an affection for him, however, that they attended almost steadily the New Providence meetings and communions.[8] He was the moderator of the first stated meeting of Lexington Presbytery, held at Timber Ridge 26 Sept. 1786, and was again moderator of the meeting at New Providence Church 20 Oct. 1788.[9] In 1796, weighed down by the infirmities of age, he resigned as pastor of New Providence Church.[10] Shortly thereafter he moved to Kentucky and resided at "Sumners Forest" in Woodford County.[11] Footnotes: 1 Princeton University, Catologus (Princeton, 1857), p. 17. His diploma is preserved in the University library. 2 Alfred Nevin, ed., Encyclopaedia of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (Philadelphia, 1864), p. 106; William Henry Foote, Sketches of Virginia, v. 2 (Philadelphia, 1856), p. 94; Washington and Lee University, Historical Papers, no. 2 (Baltimore, 1890), p. 11; National Genealogical Society Quarterly, v. 59, pp. 24-26. 3 Contributions to the History of the Synod of Virginia (Washington, 1890), p. 34. 4 Foote, op. cit., p. 57. 5 Nevin, op. cit., p. 943; Washington and Lee University, The Alumni Directory (Lexington, 1926), p. 27. 6 Foote, op. cit., p. 59. 7 Ibid., p. 97. The records of Hanover Presbytery for 11 Oct. 1767 state: "Mr. Brown laid before Presbytery the extent of his charge, and the difficulties of performing the duties of his functions, and also declared to the Presbytery that he verily believes that his usefulness is at an end in Timber Ridge Congregation; and as he apprehends it would be for the good of said congregation that the pastoral relation he sustains to them should be dissolved (the people of Timber Ridge in the mean time petitioning against his dismission, and sending commissioners to oppose it), the Presbytery . . . leave it to himself to continue with them. or confine himself to Providence, at his own discretion." 8 Foote op. cit., p. 60. 9 Howard McKnight Wilson, The Lexington Presbytery Heritage (n.p., 1971), p. 417. 10 Ibid., p. 99; Nevin, op. cit., p. 943. 11William E. Railey, History of Woodford County (Frankfort, Ky., 1938), p. 78; Woodford Co., Ky., tax book, 1798, cited in The Filson Club History Quarterly, v. 19, p. 22.

John Brown and Margaret Preston had the following children:

2 i. Elizabeth2 Brown was born December 4, 1755.
3 ii. James Brown was born September 12, 1757. James Brown died in infancy.
4 iii. John Brown was born September 12, 1757.
5 iv. William Brown was born November 22, 1759. William Brown died in infancy.
6 v. William Brown was born November 22, 1760. William died 1783 at 22 years of age.
7 vi. Mary Brown was born July 14, 1763.
8 vii. James Brown was born in near Staunton, VA September 11, 1766. James died April 7, 1835 in Philadelphia, PA, at 68 years of age. He married Anne Hart. Anne was the daughter of Thomas Hart and Susanna Gray. Anne died October 20, 1830.

James's occupation: Attorney. James Brown was the first Secretary of State of Kentucky and served as Professor of Law at Transylvania University, Lexington, KY. He served several terms as U.S. Senator from Louisiana and was Minister to France from 1823 to 1829. His biography from the Biographical Directory of the American Congress follows: BROWN, James, 1766-1835

Years of Service: 1813-1817; 1819-1823; 1823-1823 Party: Republican; Republican; Adams-Clay Republican


BROWN, James, (brother of John Brown of Virginia and Kentucky [1757-1837], cousin of John Breckinridge, James Breckinridge, and Francis Preston), a Senator from Louisiana; born near Staunton, Va., September 11, 1766; attended Washington College (now Washington and Lee University), Lexington, Va., and William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Va.; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Frankfort, Ky.; commanded a company of sharpshooters in an expedition against the Indians in 1789; secretary to the Governor 1792; soon after the cession of the Territory of Louisiana moved to New Orleans and was appointed as secretary of the Territory in 1804; subsequently became United States district attorney for the Territory; elected to the United States Senate on December 1, 1812, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of John N. Destrehan, and served from February 5, 1813, to March 3, 1817; unsuccessful candidate for reelection; again elected to the United States Senate in 1819 and served from March 4, 1819, until December 10, 1823, when he resigned; chairman, Committee on Foreign Relations (Sixteenth Congress); appointed United States Minister to France 1823-1829; returned to the United States and settled in Philadelphia, Pa., where he died on April 7, 1835.


9 viii. Samuel Brown was born January 30, 1769.
10 ix. David Brown was born July 8, 1771. David Brown died in infancy.
11 x. Eben Brown was born April 27, 1773. Eben Brown died young.
12 xi. Preston W. Brown was born January 15, 1775.

Bibliography

American National Biography; DAB; Padgett, James A., ed. ‘Letters of James Brown to Henry Clay, 1804-1835.’ Louisiana Historical Quarterly 24 (1941): 921-1177.

References
  1. Genealogy of the Descendants of John Walker of Wigdon, Scotland, by Emma Siggins White, published by Tuttle Antiquarian Boooks, Inc, p. 34.