Person:Heinrich Null (1)

Find records: birth marriage death
Heinrich 'Henry' Null
m. BEF 1718
  1. Nicholas Nullabt 1718 - 1767
  2. Balthasar NullABT 1720 - ABT 1803
  3. Phillip NullABT 1722 - 1749
  4. Maria Elizabeth Nullest 1723-1733 -
  5. Anna Maria Nullest 1723-1733 -
  6. Johann George Null, JrABT 1730 - ABT 1771
  7. Heinrich 'Henry' Null1735 - 1816
m. abt. 1756
  1. George NullABT 1758 - ABT 1787
  2. Catherine NullABT 1759 - 1822
  3. Henry Null, Jr.1760 - ABT 1809
  4. Margaret NullABT 1764 -
  5. Charles Harmon "Karl" Null1767 - 1844
  6. Christian Null1772 - 1832
  7. Adam Null1775 - ABT 1824
m. 08 November 1781
  • HHeinrich "Henry" Null1735 - 1816
m. 08 NOV 1781
Facts and Events
Name Heinrich 'Henry' Null
Unknown Heinrich 'Henry' Noll
Gender Male
Birth? 07 JUL 1735 Lebanon, Berks County, Pennsylvania
Marriage abt. 1756 prob. Augusta County, Virginiato Margaret 'Peggy' Harmon
Alt Marriage 1756 Rockingham County, Virginiato Margaret 'Peggy' Harmon
Marriage 08 November 1781 Rockingham County, Virginiato Margaret Mary Unknown
Marriage 08 NOV 1781 Rockingham County, Virginiato
Alt Death? 03 MAR 1816 Clear Creek Township, Warren County, Ohio
Death? 10 November 1816 Clear Creek Township, Warren County, Ohio
Burial? Eyer (Lutheran) Cemetery, Warren County, Ohio

Henry Null was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

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Will of Henry Null

Henry NULL Will

In the name of God Amen, I Henry Null of Warren County and State of Ohio Considering the uncertainty of this mortal life and being of sound mind and perfect memory do make and publish this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following (that is to say) First to the heirs of my son Henry Null, I give and bequest the sum of four hundred dollars (three hundred and thirty eight of which I gave him during his life and of which I have exhibited a proven amount to the administrators of his estate. I also give and bequest to my three sons, Charles Null, Christian Null and Adam Null all that tract or parcel of land lying and being in the south-east quarter of section number seven in township number two and fifth range between the Miami Rivers to be equally divided between them. To my daughter Catherine Harnsbarger, I give and bequeath one third part of the east half of Section No Ten of Township No two of Range No five between the Miami Rivers to be taken off the north end of the said half section. To my Daughter Margarett Haughman, I give and bequeath one other third part of the last mentioned half section of land lying south and joining to Catherine Hansbargers tract. To the four children the heirs of my son George Null Decd, I give and bequeath the other equal third part of the said half section to be taken off the south end and to be equally divided between them. The balance of my estate both real and personal I wish and desire to have equally divided among my legal heirs so that each one of my living children shall have one share each and the heirs of my son George Null Decd shall have and share among them and heirs of my son Henry Null shall have one share among them. Which said legally a sums of money I will and order shall be paid to said respective legatees within eighteen months after my Decease. And lastly I appoint my two sons Charles Null and Christian Null Executors of this my last Will and Testament hereby revoking al former wills by me heretofore made in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the twentyeth day of March in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and eleven Henry Null (Seal) [Warren County, Ohio - written 20 March 1811].

On the tax list for Franklin Twp in 1810.

Heinrich 'Henry'2 Null Sr. (Johann George1) was born in PA 07 Jul 1735. Heinrich died 10 Nov 1816 in Clear Creek Twp, Warren Co, OH, at 81 years of age. His body was interred 1816 in Eyer Cem, Warren Co, OH, Lutheran & Reformed. The Eyer Cem. as it is now known, has the stone of Henry Null Sr. still standing. It can be reached from Springboro by going east on E. Springboro Road and then south on 5-Points Road. It is across the bridge and left at the Y intersection. There is an Eyer house with a corner stone dated 1811. The cemetery now sits in a horse pasture with most stone down under the dirt, but Henry Sr.'s stands. This was the place of the very first Salem Church that precedes Salem Ch. & Cemetery. It was probably the first burial place outside of one's farm in the area. It is likely that Christian Null, Henry Null Jr., and Adam Null are buried there. There was a memorial stone in what is known as "Null" Cem. which is east of the log house on the right Y of 5-Points road. This cemetery is nearly obliterated. The church that stood by the "Null" Cem. was a United Brethren Church and the cemetery the same.

Settled in Warren County soon after the (Teter) Kesling family.

He married twice. He married Margaret "Peggy" Harmon in VA. Margaret was born in Augusta Co, VA abt 1734. Margaret was the daughter of Jacob Harmon and Catrina ??. Margaret died aft 1776 in Rockingham Co, VA. He married Margaret Mary Airy 1781. Margaret Mary was the widow of Cutlip Arey.

He bought property Wayne Twp, Wayne Co, IN, 21 Nov 1806. Land Patent Cincinnati Office - NE half Section 11, 164.32 acres T14R1W (NW of Middleboro, Wayne Co, IN). The first white settlers entered Wayne County in 1803. He also purchased land in Montgomery Co. and Warren Co, OH.

From Virginians in the Revolution:

Served in Capt. Nalle's Rockingham Co. Also listed in Capt. Hull's Co., Augusta Co. Militia. From Virginia Valley Records by John W. Wayland, Harrisonburg, VA Page 116 Rockingham Supplement Captain Michael Rorick's Company, No. 17: Henry Null, 1 tithable, sons Henry, Charles, Cristian, 10 horses Page 315: Adam Hedrick and Henry Null came down from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and settled in the river country, the former near present River Bank, the latter on Mill Creek immediately at its mouth. Page 316: In 1751, as stated elsewhere, Henry Null came down from Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and acquired a considerable body of land on Mill Creek, commencing at its mouth. On this tract Jacob Stover evidently built a mill before 1741, because John Stephenson's patent of land for that year the creek is described as "Jacob Stover's Mill Creek." This mill stood on the creek near the road which leads from Port Republic Road to Shady Grove Church and its remains were still visible as late as 1872-1873. Found in the Null file in Lancaster PA. The following narrative was prepared by "Aunt Sarah" in 1915: "Great Grandfather, Henry Null, was born in Germany in the year 1735. In 1740, his parents came to America. They settled on a stream in Pennsylvania, named the Swatara. There were seven children in the family; five sons, and two daughters. Their names were John, Nicholas, Balser [Henry]; and one brother that Father did not know his name. The sisters were Mrs. Brenner and Mrs. Gunckel. Great Grandfather was the youngest of the family. When he was 20 years old, he left Pennsylvania and went to Rockingham County, West Virginia. He married Miss Harmon; and his children were born and brought up in Virginia. He had had sons, Jacob, George, Henry, Charles, Christian (Grandfather) and Adam. There were four daughters; Mrs. Hoffman, Mrs. Keyser, and Mrs. Handspiger. One daughter, named Elizabeth, a girl of 15, perished in a storm on the Blue Ridge mountains. The oldest son, Jacob, died in the Revolutionary War. "In 1792, Great Grandfather gave Christian (Grandfather) $500 and told him to travel until he found a better farming country than Virginia. He went to a town on the Monongahila River where the emigrants loaded their flat boats to float down the Ohio River to settle on the Kentucky shore. When he arrived at the town, a number of families were loading a boat to go to Kentucky. He asked them to take him along, and he would help them work; but they refused as he was a stranger. Their last excuse was that they had no room for his horse; and he could not go without it. The women spoke up and told the men they could make room for his horse, and take him on board. The men on the flat boat knew but little how to manage it, and Grandfather was on but 3 days until he had the helm of the boat. One day, the horses got to fighting and kicked a board loose at the water's edge. The water poured in; the women screamed; the men were frightened. When Grandfather saw the board was not quite knocked off the pins, he let himself down over the side of the boat, and told a man to hand him an ax. With the first lick, he knocked it back on the pins. He pounded the board back into place, and told the men to caulk the seam and bail out the water. "He went with the boat as far as Maysville, Kentucky. There, he left them and stopped to visit with some friends. He stayed there for several years, working his way. When the Indians were defeated by General Wayne and it was safe to go to Ohio, Grandfather went there and traveled over part of the country, and bought land near Springboro, Warren County, Ohio. He cleared some land, built a log house, and sent word to his Father that he had a home for him. His father sent word that he would not come to Ohio unless Christian would come back to Virginia, help him sell out and move him to Ohio. Grandfather rode back to Virginia, helped his Father sell out, loaded the wagons; and started for the Ohio home. After some weeks of travel, they arrived safely at the new home. His [Christian's] brother, George, died in Virginia, and his wife and children stayed there. Two sisters, Mrs. Keyser and Mrs. Handspiger, remained in Virginia. one sister, Mrs. Hoffman, and the other brothers went to Ohio." "I write this from hearing Father tell about the Null family." Signed: "Sarah A. Null"

Kisling, Null, Surface, Sellers families connected through marriage

Susannah Arey married her step-brother, Henry Null, Jr.. When her father, Johann Gottlieb Ihrick, aka Cutlip Arey, died prior to 1780, her mother, Mary Margaret (maiden name unknown), remarried in 1781 to Henry Null, Sr. whose own first wife, Margaret Harmon, had died circa 1780. Susannah was the daughter of Mary Margaret and Cutlip Arey and became Henry, Jr's step-sister as a result of her mother's remarriage to Henry, Jr's father, Henry Null, Sr. As a result, Susannah probably lived with the Nulls after the marriage when Henry, Sr. and Mary Margaret joined households. Additionally, Henry, Jr's and Susannah's marriage was probably necessary as Susannah was already pregnant by the time they married on June 5, 1788. Their first child, Mary Margaret Null, was born barely two months after the marriage on August 12, 1788.


Page 116 Rockingham Supplement Captain Michael Rorick's Company, No. 17: Henry Null, 1 tithable, sons Henry, Charles, Cristian, 10 horses Page 315: Adam Hedrick and Henry Null came down from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and settled in the river country, the former near present River Bank, the latter on Mill Creek immediately at its mouth.

Page 316: In 1751, as stated elsewhere, Henry Null came down from Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and acquired a considerable body of land on Mill Creek, commencing at its mouth. On this tract Jacob Stover evidently built a mill before 1741, because John Stephenson's patent of land for that year the creek is described as "Jacob Stover's Mill Creek." This mill stood on the creek near the road which leads from Port Republic Road to Shady Grove Church and its remains were still visible as late as 1872-1873.

Found in the Null file in Lancaster PA. The following narrative was prepared by "Aunt Sarah" in 1915: "Great Grandfather, Henry Null, was born in Germany in the year 1735. In 1740, his parents came to America. They settled on a stream in Pennsylvania, named the Swatara. There were seven children in the family; five sons, and two daughters. Their names were John, Nicholas, Balser [Henry]; and one brother that Father did not know his name. The sisters were Mrs. Brenner and Mrs. Gunckel. Great Grandfather was the youngest of the family. When he was 20 years old, he left Pennsylvania and went to Rockingham County, West Virginia. He married Miss Harmon; and his children were born and brought up in Virginia. He had had sons, Jacob, George, Henry, Charles, Christian (Grandfather) and Adam. There were four daughters; Mrs. Hoffman, Mrs. Keyser, and Mrs. Handspiger. One daughter, named Elizabeth, a girl of 15, perished in a storm on the Blue Ridge mountains. The oldest son, Jacob, died in the Revolutionary War. "In 1792, Great Grandfather gave Christian (Grandfather) $500 and told him to travel until he found a better farming country than Virginia. He went to a town on the Monongahila River where the emigrants loaded their flat boats to float down the Ohio River to settle on the Kentucky shore. When he arrived at the town, a number of families were loading a boat to go to Kentucky. He asked them to take him along, and he would help them work; but they refused as he was a stranger. Their last excuse was that they had no room for his horse; and he could not go without it. The women spoke up and told the men they could make room for his horse, and take him on board. The men on the flat boat knew but little how to manage it, and Grandfather was on but 3 days until he had the helm of the boat. One day, the horses got to fighting and kicked a board loose at the water's edge. The water poured in; the women screamed; the men were frightened. When Grandfather saw the board was not quite knocked off the pins, he let himself down over the side of the boat, and told a man to hand him an ax. With the first lick, he knocked it back on the pins. He pounded the board back into place, and told the men to caulk the seam and bail out the water. "He went with the boat as far as Maysville, Kentucky. There, he left them and stopped to visit with some friends. He stayed there for several years, working his way. When the Indians were defeated by General Wayne and it was safe to go to Ohio, Grandfather went there and traveled over part of the country, and bought land near Springboro, Warren County, Ohio. He cleared some land, built a log house, and sent word to his Father that he had a home for him. His father sent word that he would not come to Ohio unless Christian would come back to Virginia, help him sell out and move him to Ohio. Grandfather rode back to Virginia, helped his Father sell out, loaded the wagons; and started for the Ohio home. After some weeks of travel, they arrived safely at the new home. His [Christian's] brother, George, died in Virginia, and his wife and children stayed there. Two sisters, Mrs. Keyser and Mrs. Handspiger, remained in Virginia. one sister, Mrs. Hoffman, and the other brothers went to Ohio." "I write this from hearing Father tell about the Null family." Signed: "Sarah A. Null"

The Null cemetery is at the intersection of Red Lion 5 points road & null Blvd where NB leads into the Farms of Heatherwoode (where the Null cabin is and all of it used to be the Null Farms).

Name: Henry NULL Suffix: Jr. Title: Jr. Sex: M Birth: 4 MAR 1754 in Rockingham County,Virginia Death: 1809 in Warren County,Ohio Burial: First German Reformed Cemetery, Clear Creek Township, Warren County, Ohio.

MARRIAGE: Henry Null, Jr. married his step-sister, Susannah Arey. When his mother, Margaret Harmon, died circa 1780, his father, Henry Null, Sr., remarried to Mary Margaret (maiden name unknown), the widow of Johann Gottlieb Ihrich, aka Cutlip Arey. Susannah was the daughter of Mary Margaret and Cutlip Arey and became Henry, Jr's step-sister when her mother, Mary Margaret, remarried to Henry, Jr's father, Henry Null, Sr. As a result, Susannah probably lived with the Nulls after the marriage when Henry, Sr. and Mary Margaret joined households.

Additionally, Henry, Jr's and Susannah's marriage was probably necessary as Susannah was already pregnant by the time they married on June 5, 1788. Their first child, Mary Margaret Null, was born barely two months after the marriage on August 12, 1788.