Person:Edward Ward (23)

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Maj. Edward Ward
b.abt 1726
m. bef. 1726
  1. Maj. Edward Wardabt 1726 - 1793
  • HMaj. Edward Wardabt 1726 - 1793
  • WHannah Sampleabt 1731 - 1814
  1. Lt. John Wardest 1765 -
Facts and Events
Name Maj. Edward Ward
Alt Name[10] Ensign Edward Ward
Alt Name[2] Captain Edward Ward
Alt Name[3] Major Edward Ward
Gender Male
Birth? abt 1726
Other? 1768 Barree, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, United StatesTax Assessment
Death[11] 1793 Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

Edward Ward was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

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Edward Ward

  • Edward Ward served as an EnsignS10, CaptainS2 and MajorS3.
Edward Ward was a half brother to Col. George Croghan and son to Thomas Ward. S1
He was a single man in 1750. He later married Hannah Sample, daughter of Samuel Sample.S1
17 Apr 1754 - The Ohio Company proceeded to carry out the terms of its grant and at the beginning of 1754 a small company of militia furnished by Governor Dinwiddie, of Virginia, started to build a fort at the Forks of the Ohio. The officers of this company were William Trent, captain; John Frazer, Lieutenant, and Edward Ward, Ensign. On April 17, 1754, during the absence of both the captain and lieutenant, Claude-Pierre Pécaudy de Contrecœur, the French commander at Fort Le Boeuf, made his appearance with a force of several hundred men and compelled Ensign Ward to surrender the fort at the Point near present day Pittsburgh known as Fort Prince George. The French then built Fort Duquesne at this location. However, in the fall of 1758 Edward Ward joined General John Forbes and men of the Forbes Expedition against Fort Duquesne. And, when possession was taken of its abandoned ruins Edward Ward was privileged to stand in triumph on the very spot where in April, 1754, he had been humiliated in defeat…S10
Virginia's governor, John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore, traveled to Pittsburgh, which Virginia claimed as part of its territory, to appoint government officials under the Virginia charter. In 1774, the Virginia assembly separated the western portion of Augusta County's territory and formed the District of West Augusta.S9
Chalkley's, Vol. 1 - MARCH 15, 1774. - (302) New Commission of Justices, viz: Silas Hart, John Dickison, Danl. Smith, John Poage, Abram Smith, George Moffett,* James Lockhart, John Christian, Archibald Alexander, Felix Gilbert, Samuel McDowel,* Sampn. Mathews, Alexr. McClenachan,* Mathew Harrison, George Mathews. Alexr. Robertson,* John Hays, James Craig, John Frogg,* William Tees, George Croghan, John Connelly,* Thos. Smallman, Wm. Bowyer,* John McClenachan,* Michael Bowyer, John Gratton,* Thos. Huggart, Elijah McClenachan, Josiah Davidson, John Skidmore, John Campbell, Edward Ward, Dawsey Penticost, John Gibson. (Those marked (*) qualified.)S7
Chalkley's, Vol. 1' - JANUARY 17, 1775. - (30) New Commission from Dunmore, viz: Silas Hart, John Dickinson, James Lockhart, John Christian, Daniel Smith,* John Poage, Abraham Smith,* George Moffett,* Alexr. McClenachan,* Mathew Harrison, Michael Bowyer,* John Gratton, Thomas Hughes, Elijah McClenachan,* Josiah Davidson, John Skidmore, John Campbell, Thos. Smallman, John Gibson, John Stephenson, John Cannon, Silas Hedge, William Gee (McGee?), Archd. Alexander, Felix Gilbert,* Samuel McDowell,* Sampson Mathews,* William Bowyer,* George Mathews,* Alexr. Robertson,* John Hayes,* James Craig, John Frogg, Wm. Teas,* George Croghan, Edward Ward, Dawsey Pentecost, Wm. Crawford. John McCullough, Geo. Vallendegham and David Shepherd. (Those marked (*) qualified.)S7
  • Montgomery, Thomas Lynch (editor). Pennsylvania Archives. 6th Series, Vol. 2, Page 3. Harrisburg Publishing Company, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 1906.S6
Committee Of Observation - 16 May 1775
"At a meeting of the inhabitants of that part of Augusta County that lies on the west side of the Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania), at Pittsburgh, the 16th day of May, 1775, the following gentlemen were chosen a committee for the said district, viz.: George Croghan, John Campbell, Edward Ward, Thomas Smallman, John Canon, John McCullough, William Goe, George Vallandigham, John Gibson, Dorsey Pentecost, Edward Cook, William Crawford, Devereux Smith, John Anderson, David Rogers, Jacob Van Meter, Henry Enoch, James Ennis, George Wilson, William Vance, David Shepherd, William Elliott, Richmond Willis, Samuel Semple, John Ormsby, Richard McMaher, John Nevill, and John Swearingen." Geography: District of West Augusta included all that part of Pennsylvania east of the Allegheny and Ohio, south of the Indian boundary line at Kittanning, Pennsylvania and west of the Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania). Yohogania County included that part of District of West Augusta north of the mouth of Cross Creek and the point where Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania) crosses the south line of Pennsylvania.S6
  • Dahlinger, Charles William. Fort Pitt, Privately Printed, Pittsburgh, 1922.S3
Page 31, 32, 33 – Chapter 4 – In Virginia – After the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and eight years later in 1771, the forts were regarded as useless by the English and in order to conciliate the Indians, in the autumn of 1772, General Gage ordered their abandonment.
On October 10, 1772, Major Charles Edmonstone of the 18th Royal Irish Regiment (1684–1922), the commander of Fort Pitt (Pennsylvania), sold the buildings and materials of the fort consisting of pickets, briks, stone, timber and iron in the building and walls of the fort and in the redoubts to be demolished, for the sum of fifty pounds, New York currency, to William Thompson and Alexander Ross.
The people of Pittsburgh protested and petioned the John Penn (governor) to intervene and prevail on General Gage to restore the fort. In spite of Governor Penn's (seeJohn Penn (governor)) attempts to do so failed. On February 19, 1773 the Assembly gave their reason why they declined the request, giving reason that it might offend the Indians with whom the country was at peace.
But while Fort Pitt (Pennsylvania) was abandoned it was not fully destroyed and continued to be occupied in some way for a score of years afterward. Upon its evacuation by the English it was taken possession of by Major Edward Ward, a half brother of George Croghan, the Indian trader, and Deputy Superintendent of Indian Affairs to Sir William Johnson, 1st Baronet. He was the same Ward who, while Ensign, had been compelled to surrender to the French the uncompleted fort at the forks of the Monongahela River and Allegheny River.
It is not quite clear by what right Ward took possession of Fort Pitt (Pennsylvania), but it was perhaps done as agent of or by permission of Ross and Thompson, to whom Major Charles Edmonstone of the 18th Royal Irish Regiment (1684–1922) had sold the materials and buildings of the fort. That is is probably the explanation of Ward’s possession, is indicated from the fact that a petition was presented to the Virginia Convention on December 18, 1775, by Ross and Thompson, in which they asserted that they were in possession of Fort Pitt (Pennsylvania) from the time of its abandonment by Major Charles Edmonstone of the 18th Royal Irish Regiment (1684–1922) until it was occupied by Dr. Connolly on January 1, 1774. Ward’s occupation of the fort ending at that time, and asking to be compensated for the use of the fort by Dr. Connolly. Also Ross had been the agent in Pittsburgh for the contractor for victualling his Majesty’s forces in North America, and was besides the possessor of the title to several tracts of land located about the fort, the grant of which had been made to him directly or indirectly by Major Charles Edmonstone of the 18th Royal Irish Regiment (1684–1922) prior to the evacuation of Fort Pitt (Pennsylvania) by the British. Hence he was strongly suspected of being disloyal to the American cause, and was in fact afterward attainted of treason by Act of the Pennsylvania Assembly. The possession of the property at the fort may therefore have been turned over to Ward whose loyalty was unquestioned, in order to avoid being confiscated.S3
  • Hazard, Samuel. Pennsylvania Archives, Vol. 10. Printed by Joseph Severns & Co. Philadelphia, Pa., 1854.S4
Page 463, 464 – Bill of Sale, &c. – Know all Men by these presents that I Charles Edmonstone, Esq., Capt., in his Majesty’s 18th or Royal Regiment of Foot of Ireland, and Commanding at Fort Pitt, for and in consideration of the sum of Fifty Pounds, New York Currency to me, in hand paid by William Thompson, Gent. In the County of Cumberland and Province of Pennsylvania, and Alexander Ross, Agent, Victualler at Fort Pitt; the Receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge, Have Bargained and sold on behalf of the Crown & by these presents do Bargain, sell and deliver unto the said William Thompson & Alexander Ross; All the Pickitts, Bricks, Stone, Timber, and Iron, which now is in the Building or Walls of the Fort, and in the Redoubts to be demolished by order of his Excellency the Honerable Lieut. General Thomas Gage, Commander in Chief of his Majisty’s Forces in North America. To have and to hold the said Bargained Pickitts, Bricks, Stones, Timber and Iron, unto the said William Thompson and Alexander Ross, their Executors, admrs. & assigns forever. And I the said Charles Edmonstone, in behalf of the crown, shall and will Warrant & forever defend against all Persons, by these presents the said Bargained Premises unto the said William Thompson & Alex’r Ross, their Executors and Assigns. In Witness whereof, I have hereunto, set my hand & seal the tenth day of October, one thousand seven hundred & seventy-two.S4
(Signed.) Cha's Edmonstone, [seal] Commanding
Signed, Sealed & delivered In Presence of,
Edm’d Prideaux,
Edw’d Hand (see Edward Hand)
1,244,160 Bricks,
Sundry Bricks, &c., remg. In the Govn House,
Sundry Square & cut Stones in the Walls of the Fort,
2,026 Pickitts,
4,250 Feet of Walnut Scantling,
499 Feet of Plank,
16 Double Frames of Barrack Rooms,
2,380 Feet of Square Timber,
A Square Log House, 50 Feet long,
2 Redoubts, 8 Stacks of Chimneys.S4
  • Annals of the Carnegie Museum, Vol. 3. Records of Deeds for Augusta, Virginia.S8
Page 290 – Know all whom it may concern That I Alexander Ross have for and in Consideration of Forty pounds to me paid the Rect. Whereof I hereby acknowledge bargained sold granted and made over and by these presents do bargain sell grant and make over and assign Thompson and Ross Right Title and Claim to all and singular the Estate mentioned in the within permit granted to William Thompson and Alexander Ross unto Major Edward Ward his heirs and Assigns for ever together with all the issues profits immunities and Hereditaments thereunto belonging of whatsoever kind and I do hereby warrant and forever defend the above named premises from the Claim or Claims of the aforesaid William Thompson or any other person or persons claiming under him or me, for the true performance of which I bind myself my heirs Exr and Admr by this Indenture Witness my hand and seal this 15th day of Dec. Ann Dom. 1774.
Sign’d Seal’d and Deliver’d,
Alexander Ross for self and [ L. S.]
William Thompson
“Thompson and Ross’s Right Title, and Claim to” being first interlined between the fifth and Sixth lines.
A McKee
C Graydon
John Free
At a Court Continued and held for Augusta County at Fort Dunmore May 20th 1775.
Alexander Ross Gent acknowledged this his Deed of Bargain and Sale to Edward Ward Gent which is ordered to be recorded
Test John MadisonS8
  • Acquired land in 1786 along with his son John.
  • Deed Book 17, p. 294, Allegheny County records.
John Ward, Edward's son, and Mary, John's wife (on August 4, 1797), sold lots 22 and 23 on Coal Hill to James O'Hara and Isaac Craig. (D.B. 17, p. 294, Allegheny County records). Sometime prior to John's conveyance of those lots to O'Hara and Craig, they had been taken "in execution as the property of Edward Ward" and sold to Abraham Kirkpatrick, but Kirkpatrick, for some reason, executed a deed, in which his wife joined, in John's favor, in 1794, for those lots.
A living descendant of Edward Ward's, Frank Joseph Forsyth, when he made application to the S.A.R. to be enrolled in it, was unable to give the date of birth or of marriage or of death of Edward Ward, and he made the same error as to the name of Edward's wife that some other of Edward's descendants had made when they applied for membership in the D.A.R. The error was this: they stated that Mary Archer was the wife of Edward Ward and the mother of Edward's son John. As this article discloses, the name of Edward's wife was Hannah Sample.
References
  1.   Margaret Pearson Bothwell. The Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine: Edward Ward Trail Blazing Pioneer. (Pennsylvania, June 1960), Vol. 43. No. 2., June 1960.

    Edward Ward Trail Blazing Pioneer
    Page 101 - Edward Ward Was A Half Brother to Colonel George Croghan (1720-1782) - Father's name Thomas Ward
    Page 102 - :Page 101 - Edward Ward Was A Half Brother to Colonel George Croghan (1720-1782) - Father's name Thomas Ward was a Single man in 1750 and later married Hannah Sample, daughter of Samuel Sample.
    Page 108 - Acquired land in 1786 along with his son John.
    Page 109 - John Ward, Edward's son, and Mary, John's wife (on August 4, 1797), sold lots 22 and 23 on Coal Hill to James O'Hara and Isaac Craig. (D.B. 17, p. 294, Allegheny County records). Sometime prior to John's conveyance of those lots to O'Hara and Craig, they had been taken "in execution as the property of Edward Ward" and sold to Abraham Kirkpatrick, but Kirkpatrick, for some reason, executed a deed, in which his wife joined, in John's favor, in 1794, for those lots.
    Page 111 - A living descendant of Edward Ward's, Frank Joseph Forsyth, when he made application to the S.A.R. to be enrolled in it, was unable to give the date of birth or of marriage or of death of Edward Ward, and he made the same error as to the name of Edward's wife that some other of Edward's descendants had made when they applied for membership in the D.A.R. The error was this: they stated that Mary Archer was the wife of Edward Ward and the mother of Edward's son John. As this article discloses, the name of Edward's wife was Hannah Sample.
    Page 113 - In 1774 John Ward had land for him surveyed in Kentucky.
    Page 115 - December 1776 - Edward Ward was sworn in as a
    justice of the peace of the Court of Yohogania County at its first
    session.
    Page 119 - 1780 to 1781 - A memorial, which was signed by John Ormsby, James Robinson, Edward Ward, Thomas Smallman, Devereux Smith, John Irwin, George Wallace, A. Fowler, Wm. Reddick, and some other very worthy citizens of that day, expressed
    alarm because "Colonel Brodhead, Commanding Officer at the Garrison of Fort Pitt" was exercising martial power "over this Town."
    Page 120 - Before Colonel Brodhead's recall, Edward Ward's troubles were multiplied when his son, Lieutenant John Ward, was tried at a general court martial held at Fort Pitt on June 29, 1781.
    Page 121 - Several years passed and, in 1787, Edward Ward's lots Numbers 146 and 147, and his house which had been built on one or on part of both lots, were sold at sheriff's sale 96 to James O'Hara, and became, together with a part of lot No. 145, his homestead on Water Street, the historic street that now bears the name Fort Pitt Boulevard.
    Page 123 - Hannah Ward's last will and testament is dated Dec. 3, 1813. It was recorded on Nov. 4, 1814, in W.B. 2, p. 54, Allegheny County records. A vast store of knowledge of Pittsburgh's history died with Edward Ward. His wife outlived him by many years. The Pittsburgh Gazette of November 8, 1814, reported her death as follows
    "Died—On Tuesday, the first inst., Mrs Hannah Ward, relict of Major Edward Ward." In her last will and testament, she made a bequest to her "Sister Susanah Connely", and while the name is spelled "Connely" and not "Connolly" in the will,it is this will that helps to establish that it was her sister Susannah who married the notorious John Connolly, a traitor to America. Hannah also made a bequest to Edward Semple and Sarah Semple, "children of Steele Semple and Julia, his wife, deceased." Hannah's only bequest to her "Son John Ward" was "one dollar." While her will indicates that he was still living, he may not have been. When and where he died is not known. He was, apparently, still alive in 1807.

  2. Silver Spring Presbyterian Church (Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania). Exercises in commemoration of the one hundred and seventy-fifth anniversary of the Silver Spring Presbyterian Church, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, Thursday, August 5, 1909. (Sanford, North Carolina: Microfilming Corp. of America, 1982), Page 35, 36.

    Page 35 - Edward Ward, the ensign who surrendered the fort at the forks of the Ohio is mentioned in a history of the Silver Spring Presbyterian Church, near Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. When Trent's company disbanded at Wills Creek, Ward also returned to his home, but only for a brief period. In the spring of 1756 he was again in the service of the Province, this time as captain under Lieut.-Colonel John Armstrong. Robert Callender, of Silver Spring, Rev. John Steel, Hugh Mercer, John Potter, Hance Hamilton and Joseph Armstrong were also captains in the same battalion… Capt. Ward was with Armstrong in his memorable expedition against Kittanning, and accounts agree that his company suffered severely in the attack upon that Indian stronghold…
    Page 35 – In July, 1756, Fort Granville was garrisoned by Capt. Edward Ward's company…
    Page 36 - Edward Ward continued in the military service of the Province while soldiers were needed, which then was all the time. Through the years of 1757 and 1758 his company was stationed to the westward of the Susquehanna, at the forts which were scattered along the edge of the frontier, rendering the terrified and distressed inhabitants what protection they could. In the fall of 1758 he joined Forbes Expedition against Fort Duquesne, and when possession was taken of its abandoned ruins he was privileged to stand in triumph on the very spot where in April, 1754, he had been humiliated in defeat…
    Edward Ward dealt extensively in lands and in 1769 was assessed with nearly 6,000 acres within the present bounds of Bedford County; also a large tract in the Juniata Valley. He lived longer at Carlisle, Pennsylvania than at any other place, but in 1767 he settled in Allen township, and on the Cedar Run, where now is the village of Eberly’s Mills, built the first mills that were erected in the eastern end of Cumberland county. There he continued until 1771 when his name disappears from the records, and of his subsequent history nothing is known.
    (Note: Besides Hannah Sample, he married a Silver. Possibly a daughter of James Silver, the pioneer of the Silver Spring Presbyterian Church.)

  3. Dahlinger, Charles William. Fort Pitt. (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Privately Printed, 1922), Pages 31, 32, 33.
  4.   Hazard, Samuel. Pennsylvania Archive. First Series. (Philadelphia: Printed by Joseph Severns & Co., 1853), Vol. 10, Pages 463, 464.
  5.   Holland, Wl J., editor, and J. B., associate editor Hatcher. Annals Of The Carnegie Museum: Publications of the Carnegie Museum. (Board Of Trustees Of The Carnegie Institute, 1901-), Vol 3, Page 290.

    Records of Deeds for Augusta, Virginia

    Page 290 – Know all whom it may concern That I Alexander Ross have for and in Consideration of Forty pounds to me paid the Rect. Whereof I hereby acknowledge bargained sold granted and made over and by these presents do bargain sell grant and make over and assign Thompson and Ross Right Title and Claim to all and singular the Estate mentioned in the within permit granted to William Thompson and Alexander Ross unto Major Edward Ward his heirs and Assigns for ever together with all the issues profits immunities and Hereditaments thereunto belonging of whatsoever kind and I do hereby warrant and forever defend the above named premises from the Claim or Claims of the aforesaid William Thompson or any other person or persons claiming under him or me, for the true performance of which I bind myself my heirs Exr and Admr by this Indenture Witness my hand and seal this 15th day of Dec. Ann Dom. 1774.

    Sign’d Seal’d and Deliver’d,
    Alexander Ross for self and [ L. S.]
    William Thompson

    “Thompson and Ross’s Right Title, and Claim to” being first interlined between the fifth and Sixth lines.

    A McKee
    C Graydon
    John Free

    At a Court Continued and held for Augusta County at Fort Dunmore May 20th 1775.

    Alexander Ross Gent acknowledged this his Deed of Bargain and Sale to Edward Ward Gent which is ordered to be recorded.

    Test John Madison

  6.   Montgomery, Thomas Lynch. Pennsylvania archives. Sixth series. (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Harrisburg Pub. Co., state printer, 1906-1907), Vol. 2, Page 3.

    Committee of Observation
    "At a meeting of the inhabitants of that part of Augusta County that lies on the west side of the Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania), at Pittsburgh, the 16th day of May, 1775, the following gentlemen were chosen a committee for the said district, viz.: George Croghan, John Campbell, Edward Ward, Thomas Smallman, John Canon, John McCullough, William Goe, George Vallandigham, John Gibson, Dorsey Pentecost, Edward Cook, William Crawford, Devereux Smith, John Anderson, David Rogers, Jacob Van Meter, Henry Enoch, James Ennis, George Wilson, William Vance, David Shepherd, William Elliott, Richmond Willis, Samuel Semple, John Ormsby, Richard McMaher, John Nevill, and John Swearingen." Geography: District of West Augusta included all that part of Pennsylvania east of the Allegheny and Ohio, south of the Indian boundary line at Kittanning, Pennsylvania and west of the Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania). Yohogania County included that part of District of West Augusta north of the mouth of Cross Creek and the point where Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania) crosses the south line of Pennsylvania.

  7.   Chalkley, Lyman. Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish settlement in Virginia: Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County, 1745-1800. (Rosslyn, Virginia: The Commonwealth Printing Company, 1912-1913 in Three Volumes).
  8.   Holland, Wl J., editor, and J. B., associate editor Hatcher. Annals Of The Carnegie Museum: Publications of the Carnegie Museum. (Board Of Trustees Of The Carnegie Institute, 1901-).
  9.   District of West Augusta, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).

    Virginia's governor, John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore, traveled to Pittsburgh, which Virginia claimed as part of its territory, to appoint government officials under the Virginia charter. In 1774, the Virginia assembly separated the western portion of Augusta County's territory and formed the District of West Augusta

  10. Nead, Daniel Wunderlich. The Pennsylvania-German in the settlement of Maryland: Part 25. Of A Narrative And Critical History Prepared At The Request Of The Pennsylvania-German Society. (Lancaster, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania German Society, 1913), Page 143.

    The Ohio Company proceeded to carry out the terms of its grant and at the beginning of 1754 a small company of militia furnished by Governor Dinwiddie, of Virginia, started to build a fort at the Forks of the Ohio. The officers of this company were William Trent, captain; John Frazer, Lieutenant, and Edward Ward, Ensign. On April 17, 1754, during the absence of both the captain and lieutenant, Claude-Pierre Pécaudy de Contrecœur, the French commander at Fort Le Boeuf, made his appearance with a force of several hundred men and compelled Ensign Ward to surrender the fort at the Point near present day Pittsburgh known as Fort Prince George. The French then built Fort Duquesne at this location. However, in the fall of 1758 Edward Ward joined General John Forbes and men of the Forbes Expedition against Fort Duquesne. And, when possession was taken of its abandoned ruins Edward Ward was privileged to stand in triumph on the very spot where in April, 1754, he had been humiliated in defeat…

  11. http://genforum.genealogy.com/ward/messages/4471.html