Place:Čechy, Czechoslovakia

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NameČechy
Alt namesBogemiyasource: Wikipedia
Bohemiasource: Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer (1961); Encyclopedia Britannica Online (1994-2001) accessed 10/12/98; Times Atlas of the World. Reprint ed. (1994) plate 62; Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1984); Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1988) p 156
Bohêmesource: BHA, Authority file (2003-)
Boiohaemiasource: Canby, Historic Places (1984) I, 109
Böhmensource: Rand McNally Atlas (1994) I-21
Böhmensource: Wikipedia
Čechysource: Family History Library Catalog
TypeLand
Coordinates49.333°N 14.5°E
Located inCzechoslovakia     (1918 - 1948)
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Bohemia is the westernmost and largest historical region of the Czech lands in the present-day Czech Republic. In a broader meaning, Bohemia sometimes refers to the entire Czech territory, including Moravia and Czech Silesia, especially in a historical context, such as the Lands of the Bohemian Crown ruled by Bohemian kings.

Bohemia was a duchy of Great Moravia, later an independent principality, a kingdom in the Holy Roman Empire, and subsequently a part of the Habsburg Monarchy and the Austrian Empire. After World War I and the establishment of an independent Czechoslovak state, Bohemia became a part of Czechoslovakia. Between 1938 and 1945, border regions with sizeable German-speaking minorities of all three Czech lands were joined to Nazi Germany as the Sudetenland.

The remainder of Czech territory became the Second Czechoslovak Republic and was subsequently occupied as the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia, In 1969, the Czech lands (including Bohemia) were given autonomy within Czechoslovakia as the Czech Socialist Republic. In 1990, the name was changed to the Czech Republic, which became a separate state in 1993 with the split of Czechoslovakia.[1]

Until 1948, Bohemia was an administrative unit of Czechoslovakia as one of its "lands" ("země").[2] Since then, administrative reforms have replaced self-governing lands with a modified system of "regions" ("kraje") which do not follow the borders of the historical Czech lands (or the regions from the 1960 and 2000 reforms). However, the three lands are mentioned in the preamble of the Constitution of the Czech Republic: "We, citizens of the Czech Republic in Bohemia, Moravia and Silesia…"

Bohemia had an area of and today is home to approximately 6.5 million of the Czech Republic's 10.5 million inhabitants. Bohemia was bordered in the south by Upper and Lower Austria (both in Austria), in the west by Bavaria and in the north by Saxony and Lusatia (all in Germany), in the northeast by Silesia (in Poland), and in the east by Moravia (also part of the Czech Republic). Bohemia's borders were mostly marked by mountain ranges such as the Bohemian Forest, the Ore Mountains, and the Krkonoše, a part of the Sudetes range; the Bohemian-Moravian border roughly follows the Elbe-Danube watershed.

Čechy is a former region.

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