Person:Maud of Huntingdon (1)

Maud of Huntingdon
m. 1070
  1. Adelisa _____, of HuntingdonAbt 1073 & 1076 - Aft 1126
  2. Maud of Huntingdon1074 - 1130/31
m. 1113
  1. Malcolm of ScotlandAft 1113 - Abt 1114
  2. Henry of Scotlandand Abt 1119 - 1152
  3. Claricia of ScotlandAbt 1116 -
  4. Hodierna of ScotlandAbt 1117 -
Facts and Events
Name Maud of Huntingdon
Alt Name Mathilde _____, Queen of Scotland
Alt Name Maud _____, Countess of Huntingdon
Alt Name Mathilde of Huntingdon
Gender Female
Birth[1] 1074 Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, England
Marriage 1090 Huntingdonshire, Englandto Simon I _____, de Senlis, Earl of Huntingdon-Northampton
Marriage 1113 Carlisle, Cumbria, Englandto Dauíd mac Maíl Choluim
Death[1] 23 Apr 1130/31 Scone, Perthshire, Scotland
Burial? Scone, Perthshire, ScotlandScone Abbey
Reference Number? Q2327302?


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Maud, Countess of Huntingdon ( 1074 – 1130/1131), or Matilda, was Queen of Scotland as the wife of King David I. She was the great-niece of William the Conqueror and the granddaughter of Earl Siward.

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References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Maud, Countess of Huntingdon, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.
  2.   Nancy L Kuehl, A Seale Anthology Second Edition
    683.
  3.   Maud of Northumberland, in Lundy, Darryl. The Peerage: A genealogical survey of the peerage of Britain as well as the royal families of Europe.
  4.   MATILDA [Matilda] of Huntingdon ([1071/74]-[23 Apr 1130/22 Apr 1131], bur Scone Abbey, Perthshire), in Cawley, Charles. Medieval Lands: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families.
  5.   Matilda (Maud) de Senlis, queen of Scots (d.1131), in Amanda Beam, John Bradley, Dauvit Broun, John Reuben Davies, Matthew Hammond, Michele Pasin (with others). The People of Medieval Scotland, 1093 – 1314
    PoMS No. 586, accessed 17 March 2013.