Person:Matthew Maguire (1)

Watchers
Matthew Maguire
d.1 Jan 1917
Facts and Events
Name Matthew Maguire
Gender Male
Birth[2] 1850 Atlantic Oceanborn at sea from Ireland to New York
Marriage 30 Oct 1870 Paterson, Passaic, New Jersey, United Statesto Martha McCormick
Occupation[9] 1880 machinist
Occupation[2] 1882 secretary of Paterson Local 344 of the Machinists and Blacksmiths Union
Occupation[2] 1882 Secretary, Central Labor Union of New York
Occupation[2] 1896 Ran for Vice-President on the National Socialist Labor Party ticket.
Occupation[10] 1900 editor
Death[2] 1 Jan 1917
Residence[1] Paterson, Passaic, New Jersey, United States
Occupation[1] Paterson, Passaic, New Jersey, United Statesalderman
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 New Jersey Advanced Media nj.com, 04 Sep 2017.

    au: Paul Milo
    ti: Did a Paterson man create Labor Day? And more facts about the holiday

  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 New Jersey Historical Society, 23 Aug 2000.

    http://www.jerseyhistory.org/matthew_maguire.html
    ti: Matthew Maguire, Father of Labor Day? Paterson NJ Machinist the real "Father of Labor Day"?
    au: Grace-Ellen McCrann, Special Collections Librarian

  3.   Paterson Morning Call newspaper, 2 Jul 1894.

    Paterson, New Jersey.
    editorial: "Honor to Whom Honor is Due" calls Alderman Matthew Maguire "author of Labor Day as a holiday" and "Father of the Labor Day holiday".

  4.   Curiosities of popular customs and of rites, ceremonies, observances, pp. 605-607, 1898.

    au: Walsh, William Shepard
    entry: Labor Day
    full text at hathitrust.org
    ===
    L.
    Labor Day. An annual holiday in honor of workingmen and workingwomen, which in the United States is celebrated on the first Monday in September, and in several European countries
    on May 1.
    The idea of the American holiday seems to have been born in Boston. But the credit for the first formal movement belongs to New York. In 1882 Matthew Maguire, secretary of the Central
    Labor Union in that city, with the approval of the Union, corresponded with the various labor organizations in the State with a view to setting aside one day in the year as their own holiday.
    The proposition was well received. The first Monday in September was chosen. Maguire was made chairman of the committee to arrange for the first Labor Day celebration in that
    year.
    This was so successful that it was determined to continue the holiday annually, and in 1883 the New York Central Labor Union corresponded with similar organizations throughout the
    country with a view to having celebrations elsewhere. A number of cities responded. The holiday now began to assume a national character. It was endorsed as the official labor holiday by both the Knights of Labor and the American Federation of Labor. Then the work of obtaining legal recognition began.
    The legislature of New York, by an act passed April 27, 1887, took the initiative.
    Massachusetts, and then other States, speedily followed suit.
    Meanwhile a measure to make the holiday a national one hung fire in Congress until 1894. Then Representative Amos Cummings took hold of the matter in the House, and Senator Kyle, of South Dakota, introduced a bill making Labor Day a holiday throughout the Union. The latter was immediately reported from the Senate Committee by Mr. Kyle without amendment.
    It was passed without opposition, and was signed by the President and became a law on June 28, 1894.
    In point of fact, this declaration of Congress has legal effect only within the District of Columbia and among government employees in the States; but the moral effect was to bring about a general observance of the day in nearly all the States of the Union. Up to 1894 monster parades were held in New York and other cities in honor of the day, but these proved so expensive that they have been abandoned almost everywhere. The festival is now marked mainly by the closing of shops and warehouses, by the cessation of mechanical labor (many labor unions impose heavy fines on members found at work this day), and by picnics, excursions, and public games which are expected to fill the coffers of the Unions rather than deplete them.
    Tho American Socialists take no part in the celebration of the September Labor Day, choosing rather to cling to an unofficial holiday on May 1, which has been chosen by the labor men and socialists in Europe as the occasion for their annual demonstrations. In New York the evening of May Day witnesses a parade through the streets and a mass meeting in Union Square of the various socialistic Unions. The mass meeting is addressed by prominent orators of their faith. Similar demonstrations occur in other large cities. But the rioting and bloodshed that have too often signalized the day in Europe have found no repetition
    in America.

  5.   Days and deeds; prose for children's reading and speaking, 57, [1912].

    Days and deeds; prose for children's reading and speaking; comp. by Burton E. Stevenson and Elizabeth B. Stevenson.
    Main Author: Stevenson, Burton Egbert, 1872-1962.
    Published: Garden City, N.Y. : Doubleday, Page & Doran, [c1912]

    THE HISTORY OF LABOR DAY
    THE idea of an American holiday consecrated to the
    cause of Labor seems to have been born in Boston,
    but to Matthew Maguire, Secretary of the Central Labor
    Union of New York City, belongs the credit for first act-
    ually putting the idea into execution. In 1882 he cor-
    responded with the various other labor organizations in
    the State about the matter, and finally the first Monday
    in September was chosen as Labor’s Holiday.
    The celebration was so successful that the idea was
    taken up by labor organizations in other States, it was
    endorsed by the National federations, and in State after
    State the first Monday in September was decreed a legal
    holiday. In 1894. Congress passed a bill making the day
    a legal public holiday, defining it as “the day celebrated
    and known as ‘Labor’s Holiday."’

    full text on haithitrust.org

  6.   Http://www.patersonhistory.com/people/famous.html, accessed 7 Sep 2017.

    A history of Paterson [New Jersey]

    Maguire, Mathew - (1855 -1917), Father of Labor Day.

  7.   Find A Grave.

    Matthew Maguire
    Birth: Jun. 28, 1850
    Manhattan
    New York County (Manhattan)
    New York, USA
    Death: Jan. 1, 1917
    Paterson
    Passaic County
    New Jersey, USA
    The Father of Labor Day; Candidate for Vice President of the U.S. Socialist Labor Party - 1896. Paterson Alderman, Publisher of The Paterson People, 1894-1895.
    Burial: Holy Sepulchre Cemetery
    Totowa Passaic County New Jersey, USA
    Created by: william collins
    Record added: Oct 18, 2008
    Find A Grave Memorial# 30674198

  8.   .

    1860 United States Federal Census
    Name: Matthew McGuire
    Age: 10
    Birth Year: abt 1850
    Gender: Male
    Birth Place: Atlantic Ocean
    Home in 1860: Paterson Ward 5, Passaic, New Jersey
    Post Office: Paterson
    Family Number: 289
    Value of real estate: View image
    Household Members:
    Name Age
    Christopher McGuire 35
    Mary McGuire 30
    Matthew McGuire 10
    Joseph McGuire 8
    Mary McGuire 2
    Peter McGuire 1/12

  9. .

    1880 United States Federal Census
    Name: Mathew Mcguire
    Age: 30
    Birth Date: Abt 1850
    Birthplace: For At Sea
    Home in 1880: Brooklyn, Kings, New York, USA
    Street: Front Street
    House Number: 173
    Dwelling Number: 200
    Race: White
    Gender: Male
    Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
    Marital Status: Married
    Spouse's Name: Martha Mcguire
    Father's Birthplace: Ireland
    Mother's Birthplace: Ireland
    Occupation: Machinest

    Household Members:
    Name Age
    Mathew Mcguire 30
    Martha Mcguire 28
    Mary Mcguire 9
    Christophe Mcguire 5
    Martha Mcguire 3
    Joseph Mcguire 2/12

  10. .

    1900 United States Federal Census
    Name: Matthew Mcguire
    [Matthew Mcquire]
    Age: 51
    Birth Date: Sep 1848
    Birthplace: New York
    Home in 1900: Paterson Ward 4, Passaic, New Jersey
    Ward of City: 4
    Street: Crooks Avenue
    House Number: 409
    Sheet Number: 18B
    Number of Dwelling in Order of Visitation: 314
    Family Number: 373
    Race: White
    Gender: Male
    Relation to Head of House: Head
    Marital Status: Married
    Spouse's Name: Martha Mcguire
    Marriage Year: 1868
    Years Married: 32
    Father's Birthplace: Ireland
    Mother's Birthplace: Ireland
    Occupation: Editor
    Months not employed: 0
    Can Read: Yes
    Can Write: Yes
    Can Speak English: Yes
    House Owned or Rented: O
    Home Free or Mortgaged: M
    Farm or House: H
    Household Members:
    Name Age
    Matthew Mcguire 51
    Martha Mcguire 49
    Christian Mcguire 23
    Martha Mcguire 21
    Joseph Mcguire 20
    Jane Mcguire 10
    Peter Mcguire 9
    Rose Mcguire 7

  11.   .

    1910 United States Federal Census
    Name: Mathew Mcguire
    Age in 1910: 59
    Birth Year: abt 1851
    Birthplace: At Sea
    Home in 1910: Paterson Ward 11, Passaic, New Jersey
    Street: Crooks Aveneue
    Race: White
    Gender: Male
    Immigration Year: 1851
    Relation to Head of House: Head
    Marital Status: Married
    Spouse's Name: Martha Mcguire
    Father's Birthplace: Ireland
    Mother's Birthplace: Ireland
    Native Tongue: English
    Occupation: Machinist
    Industry: Locomotive Shop
    Employer, Employee or Other: Wage Earner
    Home Owned or Rented: Own
    Home Free or Mortgaged: Free
    Farm or House: House
    Able to Read: Yes
    Able to Write: Yes
    Years Married: 39
    Out of Work: Y
    Number of weeks out of work: 2
    Neighbors: View others on page
    Household Members:
    Name Age
    Mathew Mcguire 59
    Martha Mcguire 58
    Peter Mcguire 19
    Rose Mcguire 16