Person:Geoffrey Askew (1)

Watchers
Lt-Cdr. Geoffrey Hugh Cary Askew, R.N.
d.24 Oct 1962 Berkshire, England
m. 10 Jul 1900
  1. Lt-Cdr. Geoffrey Hugh Cary Askew, R.N.1901 - 1962
  2. Joan Dorothy Askew1903 - 1928
  3. Gilian Margaret Askew1916 - 2013
  • HLt-Cdr. Geoffrey Hugh Cary Askew, R.N.1901 - 1962
  • WJoyce Mary Moore1903 - 1968
m. 20 Oct 1932
Facts and Events
Name[1][2][3][21] Lt-Cdr. Geoffrey Hugh Cary Askew, R.N.
Gender Male
Birth[1] 12 Apr 1901 St Marylebone, London, England4D Hyde Park Mansions
Residence[4] 12 Apr 1901 ... St. Marylebone, London, EnglandNote: We learn from his place of birth, that Geoffrey's parents were then living at No. 4D Hyde Park Mansions. And they must have just moved there less than 12 days earlier - as at the time of that year's census (31 March, 1901), they were living at the house of Alice Askew's widowed mother and brother - No. 3 Westbourne Street, near Hyde Park. S4
Christening[2] 3 June 1901 Westminster, London, EnglandBaptism at Christ Church, Paddington > "1901 June 3rd, Born April 12. | Geoffrey Cary | (parents) Claude and Alice | (surname) Askew | (abode) 4D. Hyde Park Mansions N.W. | (quality, trade or profession) Gentleman | (by whom ceremony performed) J.G.Cotton Browne
Note: The Rev. John George Cotton Browne was an uncle of Claude Askew.
Residence[5] 1902 St. Marylebone, London, EnglandNo doubt still residing with parents at No. 4 Hyde Park Mansions, Marylebone Road, London N.W.
Residence[6] 5 July 1903 St. Marylebone, London, EnglandNow residing at No. 11b. Oxford and Cambridge mansions - still with his parents; but also with his new baby sister Joan, who was born here on 5 July, 1903. "Built in 1885, the Hyde Park, Oxford and Cambridge mansions are some of the capital’s most enduring examples of Victorian architecture." S7
Residence[8] 1905 St. Marylebone, London, EnglandStill at No. 11b. Oxford and Cambridge mansions - which have also been described as "Aristocratic flats" - and as such may have added to their appeal for the Askews. However - and especially now with two young children - they may not have appreciated it so much when they learned that children were apparently discouraged in the building. S9 And this might have contributed to Claude and Alice Askew deciding to move yet again a few years' later - sometime within the next five years. [See next]
Residence[10] 1910 St. Marylebone, London, EnglandNow at No. 2H Portman Mansions (corner of Porter Street and Chiltern Street, where front entrance), just off Marylebone Road. Note: So the family has moved again to these newer premises ("built between 1890 and 1900"). But although nowadays described as being "more pompous and humourless than the average block of Victorian mansion flats" a couple of details on the roof may well have appealed to Claude: "... look at the skyline and see the lively little monkey that Saxon Snell has placed on the corner of Chiltern Street and Porter Street, gibbering at the dignified line of dragons on the gables over the road. And at the end of the block, who should be crouching on the party wall but Quasimodo, the Hunchback of Notre Dame, clutching to the parapet with both hands and feet, shouting incomprehensible defiance at the crowd below, who never so much as notice." S11
Census[12] 2 Apr 1911 Elstead, Surrey, EnglandResiding at Bridge House - (aged 9, "scholar part time") along with his father, Claude Askew (aged 45, "author"), his mother, Alice (aged 36), and his sister, Joan (aged 7), as well as Alice's widowed mother, Jane Leake née Dashwood (aged 66)
Education[13] bef end Dec 1914 Westgate on Sea, Kent, EnglandAt St. Michael's Preparatory School, Westgate-on-Sea in Kent. S13 - headmaster (1873-1916): Mr. Edward Hawtrey (1847-1916) S14
Education[13] Dec 1914 Isle of Wight, England"Askew, G.C. ... passed the Qualifying Literary Examination for Naval Cadetships and will enter the Royal Naval College, Osborne, in January next ...." From: The Times - Saturday, 26 December, 1914 S13
Military[13][17] 15 Jan 1915 Isle of Wight, England"Geoffrey Carey Askew Entered Service 15 January 1915" — This from his Royal Navy record.S17 And this is probably the date, when he was admitted as a cadet at The Royal Naval College, Osborne on the Isle of Wight.S13
Education[15] 14 Jan 1916 Isle of Wight, EnglandAt The Royal Naval College, Osborne in its 'Rodney No. 5' dormitory, which he would be sharing with fellow cadet, Stuart Brown, who wrote in his diary for Friday 14 January 1916: "Term begins. Travelled down with Mudgards, Price, Moultree. Had an awful shock when I first went into the dormie because the first thing I noticed was the Ox (Askew) sitting up in bed grinning all over his face. I am now in Rodney, No 5."
Note: This was almost certainly the beginning of his 4th term at Osborne - as it was for his pal Stuart Brown.S15
Education[20] 1916--17 Dartmouth, Devon, EnglandAfter Osborne he would attend the Britannia Royal Naval College in Dartmouth.S20
Military[17] 16 Sep 1917 ... At Sea—and 'at war' - Geoffrey (now 16 years old) was serving aboard HMS Agamemnon - which, as of January 1916, was part of the Eastern Mediterranean Squadron - re-designated the Aegean Squadron in August 1917. "Under both names, the squadron was dispersed throughout the area to protect Allied-held islands (and) support the British Army at Salonika. ... Agamemnon spent the remainder of the war based at Salonika and Mudros, alternating between the two bases with her sister Lord Nelson; Agamemnon was based mostly at Mudros, Lord Nelson mostly at Salonika. ...." S18 'Mudros' or Moudros / Μούδρος (to give it its Greek name) is a port city on the island of Lemnos in the northern Aegean Sea. S19
Military[20] 6 Oct 1917* Mediterranean Sea, At Sea"Many people will feel a sense of personal loss on learning of the tragic fate of Major and Mrs. Claude Askew, who are reported to have been drowned in a torpedoed vessel in the Mediterranean on October 5. ...
The first news of the tragedy came in a telegram to their son Geoffrey, who until a few weeks ago was a naval cadet at Dartmouth College. He had left Dartmouth, however, and may not have heard the news yet, as his ship is believed to be cruising somewhere in the Mediterranean, possibly near the scene of his parents’ death. ...." —From: Daily Express - Tuesday, October 16, 1917 S20
*Note: The sinking of the Italian steamer Città di Bari, upon which Geoffrey's parents were travelling from the port of Taranto bound for Corfu, actually occurred in the early hours of the morning of 6 October 1917 - about 37 miles off Paxos, one of the Ionian islands near Corfu.
Marriage 20 Oct 1932 St George Hanover Square, London, Englandto Joyce Mary Moore
Death[3] 24 Oct 1962 Berkshire, EnglandHill House, Spencer’s Wood near Reading



Lt-Cdr. Geoffrey Hugh Cary Askew, R.N.

—author of short stories & collector of antique chinoiserie—
—and served in both world wars—


Image Gallery
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Geoffrey Cary Askew - Birth, in 'Certified Copy of an Entry of Birth' - Given at the General Register Office.

    Registration District: Marylebone / 1901 Birth in the Sub-district of Christ Church in the County of London.
    « No: 193 | When and where born: Twelfth April 1901 4D Hyde Park Mansions | Name, if any: Geoffrey Cary | Sex: Boy | Name and surname of father: Claude Arthur Cary Askew | Name, surname and maiden surname of mother: Alice Jane De Courcey Askew formerly Leake | Occupation of father: Of Independent Means | Signature, description and residence of informant: Claude A. C. Askew Father 4D Hyde Park Mansions Marylebone | When registered: Twenty third April 1901 | Signature of registrar: Hugh Stokes Deputy Registrar »
    Accessed on: a 'Certified Copy of an Entry of Birth' - Given at the General Register Office (GRO) under the Seal of the said Office, the 31st day of August 2004.

  2. 2.0 2.1 Geoffrey Cary Askew - Baptism, in Ancestry.com. London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1917 [database on-line].

    « Name: Geoffrey Cary Askew / Gender: Male / Record Type: Baptism / Baptism Date: 3 Jun 1901 / Baptism Place: Lancaster Gate Christ Church, Westminster, England / Father: Claude Askew / Mother: Alice Askew / Register Type: Parish Registers  »
    Note: I have corrected this Ancestry transcription, which has misspelled the surname 'Askew' as "Asker"
    From the image:
    « Page 79 / BAPTISMS solemnised in the Parish of Christ Church Paddington in the County of London in the Year One thousand Nine eight hundred and One 1901
    « When Baptised: 18901 June 3rd, Born April 12. | Child's Christian Name: Geoffrey Cary | Parents' Names / Christian: Claude and Alice | Surname: Askew | Abode: 4D. Hyde Park Mansions N.W. | Quality, Trade or Profession: Gentleman | By whom the Ceremony was performed: J.G.Cotton Browne »
    Note: The Rev. John George Cotton Browne was an uncle of Claude Askew.
    Accessed on 08/07/2019 at: ancestry.co.uk
    Source Citation: London Metropolitan Archives; London, England; Reference Number: p87/ctc/002 / Source Information: Ancestry.com. London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1917 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. / Original data: Board of Guardian Records and Church of England Parish Registers. London Metropolitan Archives, London.

  3. 3.0 3.1 Geoffrey Hugh Carey Askew - Death, in 'Certified Copy of an Entry of Death' - Given at the General Register Office.

    Registration District: Wokingham / 1962 Death in the Sub-district of Wokingham in the County of Berkshire.
    « No: 381 | When and where died: Twenty fourth October 1962 Hill House Spencers Wood | Name and surname: Geoffrey Hugh Carey Askew | Sex Male | Age: 61 years | Occupation: Retired Commander Royal Navy | Cause of death: 1a Carcinomatosis b Carcinoma Rectum Certified by D.M. Fraser M.B. | Signature, description and residence of informant: Joyce Askew Widow of deceased Hill House Spencers Wood Nr. Reading | When registered: Twenty fifth October 1962 | Signature of registrar: K Pointow Registrar »
    Accessed on: a 'Certified Copy of An Entry of Death' - Given at the General Register Office (GRO) under the Seal of the said Office, the 24th day of July 2006.

  4. Geoffrey's soon-to-be parents, Claude Askew and wife Alice, in Ancestry.com. 1901 England Census [database on-line].

    « Postal Address: No. 3 Westbourne Street  »
    Source Citation: Class: RG13; Piece: 15; Folio: 78; Page: 21.
    Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1901 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. / Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1901. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives, 1901.
    NOTE: This mistakenly gives Claude Askew's place of birth as "Pembroke, Wales" - when actually he was born at: No. 4 Holland Park in Notting Hill, London.
    > Accessed on 08/07/2019 at: search.ancestry.co.uk/

  5. Claude Askew, in Ancestry.com. UK, City and County Directories, 1766 - 1946 [database on-line].

    Image: 1902 Post Office Directory > POST OFFICE LONDON - ASH-ATT p. 2684
    « AskewClaude,4Hyde pk.mans.Myrlbn.rdNW »
    [No. 4(probably still 'D') Hyde Park Mansions, Marylebone Road, London N.W.
    Interestingly, two lines down, is the listing for his uncle Hugh Askew]
    « Askew Hugh, 3 Hans Crescent, Chelsea SW »
    Accessed on 09/07/2019 at: ancestry.co.uk
    Source Citation
    UK, City and County Directories, 1600s-1900s
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. UK, City and County Directories, 1766 - 1946 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.

  6. Joan Askew (Geoffrey's sister), in London Daily Mail Newspaper Archives, Jul 10, 1903.

    Daily Mail, Friday, July 10, 1903 - front page - Births:
    « ASKEW.—On July 5, at 11b. Oxford and Cambridge mansions, the wife of Claude Cary Askew, of a daughter. »
    Accessed on 08/07/2019 at: newspaperarchive.com

  7.   Oxford and Cambridge mansions, in Website > marble-arch.london/culture-blog — 'The Mansions near the Marylebone Flyover'.

    « Have you ever seen the striking red and white mansions flats on Cabbell Street and Old Marylebone Road in the Marble Arch district? Built in 1885, the Hyde Park, Oxford and Cambridge mansions are some of the capital’s most enduring examples of Victorian architecture. The buildings highlight a unique period in the nation’s history when the upper-middle class longed for expansive flats and substantial leases, but without the responsibilities of a house and access to porters to service the property. »
    Accessed on 08/07/2019 at marble-arch.london/culture-blog

  8. Claude Askew, in Ancestry.com. London, England, City Directories, 1736-1943 [database on-line].

    Post Office London Directory > 1905 Street Directory, p. 591
    « OXFORD AND CAMBRIDGE MANSIONS:— ... / 11 / ... / B Askew, Claude / .... »
    Accessed on 08/07/2019 at: ancestry.co.uk

  9.   Oxford and Cambridge mansions, in John Spiers, ed.: Gissing and The City - Cultural Crisis and the Making of Books in Late Victorian England, Macmillan, 2006> Chapter 2: Buildings, Residences, and Mansions: George Gissing's 'prejudice against flats' by Richard Dennis, p.53.

    « 'Aristocratic flats'
    Oxford and Cambridge Mansions also attracted some notable illustrations. The flats were erected in stages between 1879 and 1882, to be followed during 1883 and 1884 by the even more luxurious Hyde Park Mansions. (9) The Builder (44, 1883, p. 144) ... But The Builder certainly, if unintentionally, captured the pretentiousness and fussiness of decorative detail which made Oxford and Cambridge Mansions an appropriate home for the Carnabys. The 'workings' of the flats are best illustrated by some later plans, produced in the 1930s, which differentiate between 'drawing room', 'best bedroom' and what, by then, was a 'morning room' beyond the kitchen but which, in the 1880s, would have been the maid's bedroom (Figure 2.4). (11) In this way Eales had attempted to implement his ideas about segregating different activities and different classes, though he thought it preferable to exclude some people, such as children, altogether: "It was most disagreeable to be always meeting them on the stairs" (The Builder 46, 1884, p. 386). Fortunately, most residents of Oxford and Cambridge Mansions were childless, just like the Carnabys. Only 5 per cent of the Mansions' population were aged 0-9 in 1891, compared to 28 per cent of inhabitants in Farringdon Road Buildings. .... »
    Accessed on 08/07/2019 at: books.google.ca

  10. Claude Askew, in Ancestry.com. London, England, City Directories, 1736-1943 [database on-line].

    Post Office London Directory > 1910 Street Directory, p. 473
    « PORTNAM MANSIONS (W. Postal District):— ... / 2 / ... / H, Askew, Claude / .... »
    Accessed on 08/07/2019 at: ancestry.co.uk
    Source Citation
    London Metropolitan Archives; London, England; London City Directories
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. London, England, City Directories, 1736-1943 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2018.
    Original data: London Directories held by the London Metropolitan Archives and Guildhall Library, London, England. Images produced by permission of the City of London Corporation.

  11.   Portman Mansions, in Website > ornamentalpassions.blogspot.com — "Devoted to the unexpected details that help to make life in the city worth living".

    « Few buildings are more pompous and humourless than the average block of Victorian mansion flats, and at ground level Portman Mansions in Marylebone look just as dull, redbrick and deadening as any. They were built between 1890 and 1900 by Henry Saxon Snell, an architect who usually specialised in workhouses and hospitals.
    But look at the skyline and see the lively little monkey that Saxon Snell has placed on the corner of Chiltern Street and Porter Street, gibbering at the dignified line of dragons on the gables over the road.
    And at the end of the block, who should be crouching on the party wall but Quasimodo, the Hunchback of Notre Dame, clutching to the parapet with both hands and feet, shouting incomprehensible defiance at the crowd below, who never so much as notice. »
    Accessed on 08/07/2019 at: ornamentalpassions.blogspot.com

  12. Geoffrey Askew & family, in Ancestry.com: 1911 England Census [database on-line].

    « Name: Geoffrey Askew / Age in 1911: 9 / Estimated birth year: abt 1902 / Relation to Head: Son / Gender: Male / Birth Place: Marylebone, London, England / Civil Parish: Elstead / County/Island: Surrey / Country: England / Street address: Bridge House, Elstead Godalming, Surrey / Occupation: School Part Time / Registration District: Hambledon / Registration District Number: 35 / Sub-registration district: Witley / ED, institution, or vessel: 7 / Household schedule number: 95 / Piece: 3148 »
    From image:
    | Name and Surname | Relationship to Head of Family | Age | Marriage | Profession or Occupation | Birthplace
    « Claude Askew | Head | 45 | Married | Author | London Notting Hill
    « Alice Askew | Wife | 36 | ditto | (*should also have put Author*) | London Paddington
    « Geoffrey Askew | Son | 9 | | School Part Time | London Marylebone
    « Joan Askew | Daughter | 7 | | | London Marylebone
    « Jane Leake | Mother in Law | 66 | Widow | | London Marylebone
    [Plus one visitor: Francis Alfred Lyall; and four servants]
    / Postal Address: Bridge House, Elstead, Godalming, Surrey »
    Source Citation: Class: RG14; Piece: 3148; Schedule Number: 95.
    Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1911 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. / Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1911. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA), 1911.
    Accessed on 09/07/2019 at: ancestry.co.uk/

  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 Askew, G. C., in The Times - Saturday, 26 December, 1914.

    Column headed: ROYAL NAVAL COLLEGE, OSBORNE. THE NEW CADETS.
    « The following Candidates are declared to have passed the Qualifying Literary Examination for Naval Cadetships and will enter the Royal Naval College, Osborne, in January next:--
    Name | School
    ... | ...
    Askew, G.C... | Mr. Hawtrey, St. Michaels, Westgate-on-Sea
    .... »

  14.   Ancestry.com. Cambridge University Alumni, 1261-1900 [database on-line].

    Original data: Venn, J. A., comp.. Alumni Cantabrigienses. London, England: Cambridge University Press, 1922-1954.
    « Name: Edward Montague. Hawtrey
    College: ST JOHN'S / Entered: Michs. 1869 / Died: 14 Aug 1916
    More Information: Adm. pens. at ST JOHN'S, Aug. 24, 1869. Of Berkshire. [2nd] s. of the Rev. J[ohn] W[illiam] (1837) [and Frances Mary Anne]. B. at Windsor, Berks. Bapt. Oct. 10, 1847. [School, Eton.] Matric. Michs. 1869; B.A. 1873. Athletics ‘blue,’ 1870, 1871, 1872 (3 miles); President, C.U.A.C., 1872. Head Master of St Michael's Preparatory School, Westgate-on-Sea, 1873-1916. Died there Aug. 14, 1916. (Scott, MSS.; Eton Sch. Lists; Schoolmasters' Directories; Book of Blues; The Times, Aug. 17, 1916.)  »
    Accessed at: ancestry.co.uk

  15. Royal Navy Cadet G. C. Askew (nicknamed the 'Ox'), in A Facebook blog by Jane Cavell: 'Stuart Brown's Diary'.

    « Friday 14 January 1916
    "Term begins. Travelled down with Mudgards, Price, Moultree. Had an awful shock when I first went into the dormie because the first thing I noticed was the Ox (Askew) sitting up in bed grinning all over his face. I am now in Rodney, No 5."
    Notes:
    This was Stuart’s fourth term at the Royal Naval College, Osborne. He is on a list, published in ‘The Times’ on 26 December 1914, of boys who had passed the ‘Qualifying Literary Examination for Naval Cadetships’ and would be starting at the Osborne, in January 1915 (the full list will be posted later). Three of the boys he mentions in his diary today are on that list too: H. P. Price, L. G. F. Moultrie and G.C. Askew. The fourth, ‘Mudgards’, has yet to be identified.
    They probably travelled by rail via London to Portsmouth. (In their first term, cadets were met at Portsmouth Harbour Station and escorted across to the Isle of Wight, but more senior boys were expected to get themselves to Osborne.)
    ‘Rodney, No 5’ – one of the dormitories. »
    This was posted on the blog on January 14, 2016 - exactly one hundred years later. Quoted here courtesy of Jane Cavell.
    Accessed at: facebook.com/Stuart-Browns-diary

  16.   Wikipedia > two entries: 1. 'Royal Naval College, Osborne' & 2. 'Britannia Royal Naval College'.

    « The Royal Naval College, Osborne, was a training college for Royal Navy officer cadets on the Osborne House estate, Isle of Wight, established in 1903 and closed in 1921.
    Boys were admitted at about the age of thirteen to follow a course lasting for six academic terms before proceeding to the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth .... »
    Accessed at: wikipedia.org

    « Britannia Royal Naval College (BRNC), commonly known as Dartmouth, is the naval academy of the United Kingdom and the initial officer training establishment of the British Royal Navy. It is located on a hill overlooking the port of Dartmouth, Devon, England. ...
    The college was originally known as the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth (BRNC). As a Royal Naval shore establishment, it was later known also by the ship name HMS Britannia (a battleship called Britannia operated from 1904 to 1918). .... »
    Accessed at: wikipedia.org

  17. 17.0 17.1 Geoffrey Carey Askew, in The National Archives > Royal Navy officers’ service records 1756-1931.

    Catalogue Reference:ADM/196/148 / Image Reference:336
    « Name Geoffrey Carey Askew
    Date of Birth 12 April 1901 Entered Service 15 January 1915
    Seniority as {Acting Sub-Lieutenant 15 September 1920 / Sub-Lieutenant 15 May 1921 / Lieutenant (Act) 15 May 1923 / Lieutenant 15 May 1923 / Lieut Commander 15 May 1931
    ...
    Ship | Rank | From | To | observer |
    Agamemnon | Mid (Midshipman) | 16·9·17 | 14·4·19 |
    King George V | ditto (Midshipman) | 14·4·19 | 1·6·19 |
    Woolwich for Valkyre | ditto (Midshipman) | 1·6·19 | 24·11·19 |
    Marlborough | ditto (Midshipman) | 24·11·19 | 9·10·20 |
    Marlborough | HSL (Acting Sub-Lieutenant) | 15·9·20 | 9·10·20 |
    Orion | ditto (Acting Sub-Lieutenant) | 9·10·20 | (15·)1·21 |
    Seawolf | ditto (Acting Sub-Lieutenant) | 15·1·21 | 31·8·22 |
    ditto (Seawolf) | SL (Sub-Lieutenant) | 15·1·21 | 31·8·22 |
    on recoin-? | ditto (Sub-Lieutenant) | 15·7·21 | 31·8·22 |
    ....  » (to be added to later)
    Accessed on 16/04/2015 at: The National Archives > Royal Navy officers’ service records 1756-1931 > nationalarchives.gov.uk. Pdf file downloaded (via email) from The National Archives.

  18.   HMS Agamemnon, in Wikipedia > 'HMS Agamemnon (1906)'.

    « ... Mediterranean operations, 1916–18
    With the end of the Dardanelles Campaign in January 1916, British naval forces in the area were reorganized, and Agamemnon became part of the Eastern Mediterranean Squadron, which was re-designated the Aegean Squadron in August 1917. Under both names, the squadron was dispersed throughout the area to protect Allied-held islands, support the British Army at Salonika, and guard against any attempted breakout from the Dardanelles by the German battlecruiser Goeben and light cruiser Breslau. Agamemnon spent the remainder of the war based at Salonika and Mudros, alternating between the two bases with her sister Lord Nelson; Agamemnon was based mostly at Mudros, Lord Nelson mostly at Salonika. .... »
    Accessed on 09/07/2019 at en.wikipedia.org

  19.   Moudros, in Wikipedia > 'Moudros'.

    « Moudros (Greek: Μούδρος) is a town and a former municipality on the island of Lemnos, North Aegean, Greece. ...
    During the Dardanelles Campaign of the First World War, the town and its harbour were used as an Allied base, commanded by Admiral Rosslyn Wemyss. The British Empire troops used the form Mudros. .... »
    Accessed on 09/07/2019 at en.wikipedia.org

  20. 20.0 20.1 Alice and Claude Askew - plus their son Geoffrey, in Daily Express - Tuesday, October 16, 1917 p. 3, col. 4.

    « ALICE AND CLAUDE ASKEW. TRAGIC DEATH OF FAMOUS NOVELISTS. IN A TORPEDOED SHIP.
    Many people will feel a sense of personal loss on learning of the tragic fate of Major and Mrs. Claude Askew, who are reported to have been drowned in a torpedoed vessel in the Mediterranean on October 5.
    Everybody knew the Askews as novelists whose collaboration resulted in a tremendous popularity for their work, and readers of the Daily Express will remember also their recent vivid accounts of events in Serbia, and their record of the heroism of the Serbian army.
    Mr. and Mrs. Askew were in an Italian ship on their way to Corfu, the headquarters of their relief work among the Serbians, when the steamer was torpedoed.
    The first news of the tragedy came in a telegram to their son Geoffrey, who until a few weeks ago was a naval cadet at Dartmouth College. He had left Dartmouth, however, and may not have heard the news yet, as his ship is believed to be cruising somewhere in the Mediterranean, possibly near the scene of his parents’ death. .... »
    From a 'clipping' - previously in the possession of Miss Gilian (Jill) Askew, youngest daughter of Alice Askew - and now in my possession, since my aunt Jill's death in 2013.
    Also available to be accessed on ukpressonline.co.uk, by registering on the site. And with a subscription, it may be downloaded as a pdf file.

  21. 'Geoffrey Hugh Carey Askew'
    —a note about his names - both the given and the taken—
    by Robin Cary Askew
    My father, Geoffrey Askew was baptised "Geoffrey Cary" - his name being so registered on his birth certificate. The middle name 'Cary' had already become a frequent 'family name' ever since Geoffrey's great grandfather, Major Thomas Askew married Lucy Elizabeth, youngest daughter of Robert Cary, a London and Virginia merchant, of Watling Street, London and Hampstead, Middlesex. The eldest brother of Thomas, Adam Askew, had also married a daughter (the eldest of three) of Robert Cary - Amy Anne.
    The family custom of adding the name 'Cary' began when Major Thomas Askew and his wife Lucy née Cary named their eldest son 'Thomas Cary'. This Thomas Askew, the younger, died both young and unmarried. But the nascent 'tradition' was then carried on by his only brother John Askew. The Rev. John Askew did not himself enjoy the addition of 'Cary' as a middle name. He was just 'John'. But he did give the additional middle name 'Cary' to three of his five children: his eldest child and daughter, Amy Ellen Cary, as well as his two sons, Hugh Henry John Percy Cary and Claude Arthur Cary.
    Actually great uncle Hugh, who must have had the largest number of middle names ever in our family history, was not initially registered with the first name 'Hugh'. That appears to have been added later. Unless it was left out by mistake, when his birth was registered on 22nd October 1862. He was born on 18th September of that year. But he was only baptised the following year on April 10th. And that is when his first name was recorded as 'Hugh'. His date of birth being written in the margin of the church register.
    And it appears, as already stated, that Claude Arthur Cary Askew named his only son Geoffrey with the single middle name 'Cary'. But at some point the extra middle name 'Hugh' was added. It seems that 'Hugh' being added later was becoming a bit of a habit in this family! At least in the various registers - if not as an afterthought on the part of the parents. Or in Geoffrey's case, it may have been his own idea. And presumably to honour his uncle Hugh, who must have in some way taken the place of his father, after the death of both his parents on October 6th 1917, when he was just sixteen years old - albeit already serving as a Royal Navy midshipman and at sea during the first world war. His navy record does not record him with the additional name 'Hugh'.
    His uncle was not necessarily the first 'Hugh' in our family history. But that original 'Hugh' may have not been related at all. He may have been one of those not infrequent aspirational additions to a family's lineage. But without any true substance in fact. Even the venerable College of Arms could not definitively link that 'Hugh Askew' to the line of Adam Askew, for whom they awarded arms and drew up a pedigree in 1760: 'The Pedigree of Adam Askew, Esquire, of Newcastle upon Tyne'. Where there ought to be a connecting red line in this pedigree there is none. Just a significant empty space between that "Hugon : Ayscough de Lekelay als Lacra in Com Cumb : afterwards Sir Hugh Askew of Seaton Knt He was High Sheriff for the County of Cumb : a.o 1561" to "Askew of Graymains in Co : Cumbria" – who was the father and grandfather of two more 'Hugh' Askews, both of Graymains. Perhaps this repetition of the name 'Hugh' lent credence to the idea of an actual connection. And even this 'Askew of Graymains' connection has been put into question. See the page for John Askew, of Kirkby in Furness, Lancashire, who was the grandfather of that Adam Askew of the 1760 College of Arms pedigree. And is really the earliest Askew for whom there is no doubt of a connection.
    But all of this is rather aside from the curiosity of these two much more recent members of this Askew family, who acquired the name Hugh - either as a first one or a middle one - some little or longer time after they were first registered.
    And getting back specifically to our Geoffrey Cary Askew (my father) – later Geoffrey Hugh Cary Askew – or rather "Geoffrey Hugh Carey Askew", as his name has now mysteriously also acquired the addition of a letter 'e'! And his Royal Navy record does record his solitary middle name 'Carey' there with that additional 'e'. Meaning that must have happened before 'Hugh' was also added. However, since I began researching my family history, I have decided to drop the 'e' in my own middle name and revert to its original spelling of 'Cary' - without that intrusive 'e'. Of course the spelling of names has not been so consistent historically as it usually is today. We only have to look at Shakespeare for that! And perhaps in my father's day, it was also not as important as it clearly is nowadays. And in this day and age, it would be quite the hassle to officially drop that 'e' in my name. Much easier to just use 'Cary' without the 'e' as a 'pen name'. And especially as I only use it to sign articles and things like this that I have written!
    —Robin Cary Askew (Robinca) – 11 July 2019.
    P.S. I should mention that there were members of the Cary family of Devon (who may or may not be connected to my certain ancestor Robert Cary and his certain grandfather James Cary), who also were known to have spelled their name with an 'e'. Such as Sir William Carey, husband of Mary, sister of Anne Boleyn. But — and despite the 'wishful thinking' of that Adam Askew, who married Amy Cary and commissioned a painting of a family tree purporting to show that Sir William Carey was an ancestor of his wife's Cary line — he was not! If there is a connection between the family of James Cary, 'Citizen & Salter' – merchant and tobacconist of Watling Street, London and the family of Sir William Carey, courtier, it could just possibly have been via an older brother of Sir William's father. See the 'Possible Origins of James Cary' notes on his page: James Cary. So, at the very best I suppose, a pretty distant 'cousinship' might be a possibility.
    And my father did have that rather pretentious family tree painting hanging on the wall of the second floor landing of the house, where I spent my childhood. He most likely inherited that painting from his childless uncle Hugh, to whom it would have descended from his equally childless great uncle Adam Askew. And, just speculating here - but he might have been inspired to add en 'e' to his originally 'e'-less middle name of 'Cary' by this notion of a connection to that long ago Sir William Carey - with an 'e'. —R.C.A. (still 11/07/2019)